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March 20, 1954 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-03-20

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4

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TIE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MARCH 20, 1954

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Church Plans
U.S. Policies
Conference
The Ann Arbor Council of
Churches has planned a discus-
sion-conference of "The Christian
and World Order" to be held from
9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday,
March 27, in the First Methodist
Church,
Keynoting the all-day sessions
will be an address on "Christian
faith and international responsi-
bility" delivered by Dr. Merrill
Abbey, pastor of the First Metho-
dist Church and President of the
local Council.
** *
AFTER THE address those at-
tending the conference will break
up into six discussion groups to
examine: "The United States and
Foreign Economic Policy," "The
United States and Less-Developed
Areas," "The United States and
Collective Security," "Christian
Faith and International Responsi-
bility," "The United States and
the United Nations," and "How
We Make Our Foreign Policy."
Resource people for each of
the sections include Prof. Wolf-
gang Stolper of the economics
department, Prof. Jahangir
Amuzegar of the Near Eastern
studies department, Prof. Pres-
ton W. Slosson of the history
department, Prof. Robert C.
Angell, of the sociology depart-
ment and Prof. Marshall M.
Knappen of the political science
department.
Under discussion will be 12 res-
olutions passed by a recent Cleve-
land meeting of the Council of
Churches.
Registration fee for the confer-
ence will be 50 cents. A luncheon
held during the conference will
cost an additional $1. Reservations
may be made by telephoning the
Ann Arbor Council of Churches of-
fice at NO 8-6531.

Former Student Enters
Indiana Congress Race

-Daily-John Hirtzel
PROFS. MILHOLLAND, PEEK, MOISE, HENDERSON, ANDERSON AND HOOD TALK ON MERITS
OF LECTURE AND DISCUSSION METHODS OF TEACHING
Forum Discusses Teaching Methods

John Brademas, former Univer-
sity law school student, will run
for the House of Representatives'
nomination on the Democratic
ticket in the Third Indiana Dis-
trict, friends here learned yester-
day.
Twenty-seven year-old Brade-
mas is one of the youngest Con-
gressional candidates in the coun-
try. He attended law school here
for a short time last year but left
to enter politics.
A graduate of Harvard in busi-
ness administration in 1949, he did
graduate work in international af-
fairs there from 1949-54. The next
two years he attended Oxford Uni-
versity as a Rhodes Scholar.
Brademas will speak on "Politi-
cal Responsibility" at 6:45 p.m.
tomorrow in the Wesley Lounge of
the First Methodist Church. The
public is invited to attend.
'On The Riviera'
Danny Kaye will go through his
famed double-talk shenanigans in
the Student Legislature Cinema
Guild film feature at 7 and 9
p.m. today and 8 p.m. tomorrow in
Architecture Auditorium.
Gene Tierney and Corinne Cal-
vet will also play starring roles in
"On the Riviera."
FREE
DELIVERY SERVICE
9-10-11 EVERY EVENING.
Hamburgers, Sandwiches
Home-baked Pies and Cookies
DAIRY QUEEN PRODUCTS
JEAN'S
SNACK SERVICE
Phone NO 8-6076

It's So Easy . .
to BANK BY MAIL
Your deposit slip and receipt are
included in this convenient form .
frorn
Ann Arbor Bank
State Street Office
330 South State
Main Teller Ann Arbor
SEE US NOW
FOR INFORMATION
AN N ARBOR BANK
MAIN AND HURON STREETS
STATE STREET AT NICKELS ARCADE
1108 SoUTH UNIVERSITY
WHITMORE LAKE, MICHIGAN

JOHN BRADEMAS
... candidate
JOIN THE RED CROSS
CAMPUS CAMPAIGN

t,

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By FREDDI LOWENBERG
In the third of a series of for-
ums on college and university
teaching held yesterday, a six man
panel weighed the' merits of the
lecture and the discussion methods
of teaching.
.Presenting the topic of t he
panel, Prof. John E. Milholland of
the psychology- department said
that the question to consider is
Regents Make
Appointments,
Grant Leaves
(Continued from Page 1)
solving conflict in the behavior
and background of children.
Prof. Gerald S. Blum, associ-
ate professor of psychology, who
plans to do research on cross-
cultural applications of experi-
mental findings in the area of
perception, with special refer-
ence to personality dynamics.
Prof. Paul M. Spurlin, of ro-
mance languages, who plans to
spend a year in France to renew
acquaintance with the "living
French language and culture"
* * *
LEAVE for the year also was
granted to Prof. Charles C. Fries,
of the English department and di-
rector of the English Language In-
stitute,
Six leaves, five of them sab-
baticals, were granted for the
first semester of the 1954-55
year. Prof. Robert B. Hall, of
the geography department and
director of the Center for Japa-
nese Studies, has been assigned
to duty at the center's field sta-
tion at Okayama, Japan..
The sabbaticals went to;
Prof. Leslie A. White, chairman
of the Department of Anthropolo-
gy, who plans to finish an ethno-
logical study of the Indian Pueblo
of Sia, New Mexico. "
Prof. William Haber, of the eco-
nomics department, who will do
research and writing in the field
of labor economics and social in-
surance and possibly will spend
some time abroad, especially in
England.
INCLUDED also are: Prof. Rob-
ert H. Super, of the English de-
partment who will study 'the life
and thought of Matthew Arnold,
19th century poet and critic.
Prof. Frederick S. Turneaure,
of the geology department who
plans to make a detailed analy-
sis and correlation of information
on the major ore deposits of Cen-
tral Bolivia gathered during 12
1years in Bolivia.
Prof. James T. Wilson, of the
geology department who plans to
visit Italy and Switzerland. He will
attend the 10th general assembly
of the International Union of
Geodesy and Geophysics in Rome.

not which method is superior, but
how to make each function better.
Citing evidence taken in an ex-
periment made here comparing
tutorial, discussion and recitation
methods, the psychologist said that
there were no significant differ-
ences found inlthe knowledge, in-
terest and ability of students in
the three experimental groups.
COMPOSING THE panel were
Prof. George A. Peek of the politi-
cal science department, Prof. Ed-
win E. Moise of the mathematics
department, Prof. Leigh C. Ander-
son, chairman of the chemistry de-
partment and Prof. Marguerite V.
Hood of the music school, with
Prof. Algo D. Henderson of the
education school serving as chair-
man.
"The lecture is valuable when

you have to cover a large amount
of descriptive material, parti-
cularly on the freshman and
sophomore level," Prof. Peek ex-
plained, with discussion effec-
tive for questions on the mater-
ial.
Favoring the "maximum of dis-
cussion," Prof. Moise pointed out
that mathematics being full of
conceptual ideas, the question "is
to get students to latch on to the
ideas and translate them into their
own private language."
Recommending that the lecturer
pick out and outline the material
from the text, Prof. Anderson said
the group should be broken up for
discussion following a talk by an,
instructor. Group interaction is
also a discussion problem, Ander-
son continued.

i

4.

A

01,,i, *r,

Proposed Activities Building
Referred to cU' Administration

TONIGHT!

(Continued from Page 1)
fice space, meeting rooms and work
room space.
Permanent office space prob-
ably would be granted to a num-
ber of campus groups including
the Interfraternity Council, In-
ter-House Council, Student Leg-
islature, Panhellenic Association,
Assembly Association, Joint Ju-
diciary Council, Women's Judi-
ciary Council, Alpha Phi Omega,
Intercooperative Council, Inter-
national Students Association,
Senior Board, Wolverine Club,
Michigras Committee and the
Glee Club.
Union and League student acti-
vities are also expected to be hous-
Botany Books
On Exhibition
Japanese botanical books dating
as far back as 1666 are currently
on exhibit at Clement's Library.
Volumes on display from the
first Japanese illustrated encyclo-
pedia, "Pictures To Teach Child-
ren," are comparable to the con-
temporary "Books of Knowledge."
A later, improved edition ofref-
erence books shows the original
concept of the Phoenix which rests
only in the Paulownia tree, never
touches ground and eats only seeds
of the Bamboo treewhich are
borne once in many years.
Also to be seen are two volumes
of an old book dealing with house-
hold medicine and first aid to the
injured.
The exhibit, compiled by Prof.
Hide Shokara of the Oriental Lan-
guages department and Prof. Har-
ley H. Bartlett of the botany de-
partment, also contains books on
flower arrangement, poetical in-
terpretations of names of flowers
and flowers symbolic of the four
seasons.

ed along with a number of other'
groups which will have small of-
fices or share space.
Any student organization prob-
ably could take advantage of meet-
ing room space and similar ar-
rangements would be set up for the
work area. In addition, a central
fileroom, a secretariat and lounge
space are plannea.
The committee is chaired by
Harry Lunn, '54, Daily managing
editor, and includes Bob Neary,
'54BAd., SL president; Janet Net-
zer, '54, SL delegate to the Stu-
dent Affairs Committee; Sue Riggs,
'54, League president; Jay Strick-
ler, '54, Union president; Lee Fiber,
'54, Joint Judiciary Council chair-
man, and Barbara Bos, '54Ed., Wo-
men's Judiciary Council chairman.
Also serving on the committee
are Martha Hill, '54, Panhellenic
president; Dolores Messinger, '55-
Ed., Assembly president; C. A.
Mitts, '54, retiring IFC president;
Roger Kidston, '56L, IHC presi-
dent, and Eric Vetter, '54, Daily
city editor. Pete Lardner, '54E, for-
mer Joint Judic hairman was a
member until his graduation in
February.
Army Team Wins
In Rifle Contest
The University's Army ROTC
rifle team defeated Western Mich-
igan College's team in a shoulder-
to-shoulder match by a score of~
1815-1753.
Richard 0. Roemer, '57, was
high man for the local team shoot-
ing a score of 301 out of a pos-
sible 400.

The Slide Rule Ball

League Ballroom

9 till 1

TICKETS ON SALE AT THE DOOR

11

ii:

THE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw, Phone NO 2-0085
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian Adult Group-Dr. Milton
Rosenberg: "Research Findings on Attitudes."
11:00 A.M.: Service of Worship-Sermon on:
"About Us and Within" by Rev. Edward H.
Redman.
7:30 P.M.: Unitarian Students-"Modern Art."
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev, Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205. Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M.: Morning Service.
7:00 P.M.: Evening Service.
THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY in Ann Arbor
presents Series of Introductory Talks on Theosophy
every Wednesday at 8 P.M.
Place: 736 So. State St., Telephone NO 2-6295
Topic for next Wednesday, March the 24th:
"Reincarnation."
Public is cordially invited.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone NO 2-1121
Wm. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M.: Sunday School. Classes for all ages.
11:00 A.M.:. "The Face of God."
6:00 P.M.: Student Guild.
7:30 P.M.: "Warnings About False Teachers."
Wed. 7:30: Prayer Meeting.
Come and hear The Word of God.
A warm welcome awaits you here.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Sts.
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00 A.M.
Sunday at 8-9:30 A.M., 11-12.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings 7:30 P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in Father Richard Center.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
William and State Sts.
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
10:45 A.M.: The third sermon in Lenten Series,
"Great Sayings" subject being "Still the An-
cient Riddles Mar."
7:00 P.M.: The Student Guild will meet in the
Mayflower Room to hear the Rev. George
B'arger of Memorial Christian Church. Will
talk on "What is Sin?" The third in the series:
"This is the Christian Faith."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
AND STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Charles Mitchell, Assistant Minister
William S. Baker, Student Pastor
Donna B. Lokker, Program Assistant
9:15 A.M.: Breakfast Seminar. Part I of the
discussion with Michael Liuzzi, on, "The Na-
ture of God."
9:15 and 11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship. Dr.
Kuizenga preaching on "Words, Meanings,
and Actions."
5:30 P.M.: Westminster Guild Supper in the
Social Hall.
6:45 P.M.: Rev. Harold Viehman from the Pres-
byterian Board of Christian Education will
speak to the Guild about "The Student and
the Ecumenical Church."

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH,
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 10:45 A.M.: Worship. "And We Are
Whole Again," Mr. Abbey preaching.
10:20 A.M.: Student Seminar.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M.: Program-John Brodemos, "Political
Responsibility."
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
(Formerly at Y.M.C.A.)
Sundays: 10:15, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays: 7:30 P.M., Bible Study.
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ-ABC Net-
work Sundays: 1:00-1:30 P.M.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 North Division St.
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Dr. Robert H. Whitaker, Chaplain for
Student Foundation
Mrs. Elizabeth M. Davis, Social Director
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Cornentary
(Both services followed by Student Breakfast,
Canterbury House.)
10:15-10:45 A.M.: Junior High Classes.
11:00-12:15: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer and Sermon.
6:00 P.M.: Student Supper Club, Canterbury
House.
8:00 P.M.: Evening Prayer and Commentary.
During the Week: Daily 5:15 P.M. Evening Pray-
er, Chapel; Holy Communion Tuesday (Chap-
el) 10 A.M., Wednesday 7 A.M., Thursday
7 A.M., Friday 12:10 P.M., Saturday (Chapel)
8:30 A.M; Student Tea 4:00-5:15 Tuesday
and Friday; Wednesday Lenten Luncheon
12:10-12:50 Canterbury House; Thursday,
Lenten Mission on Life of Prayer 7:30 P.M. in
church; Friday, Canterbury Club 7:30 'P.M.,
Saturday, Quiet Day for Men 8:30 A.M. to
5:45 P.M.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Two Worship Op-
portunities. with the pastor preaching on "I
Believe in God the Son."
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta Supper.
Sunday at 7:00: Gamma Delta-Sponsored Concert
of Lenten Organ Music, Mr. E. W. Hitzemann
of Saginaw, Guest Organist.
Wednesday, 12:30 to 12:55: Lenten Noonday
Devotion.
Wednesday at 7:30: Lenten Vespers, with sermon
by the pastor.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services,
Mar. 21-Matter.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5. Friday evenings
from 7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30
to 4:30.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon: "How
Clear Is Your Vision?"
Nursery for children during service.
9:45 A.M.: Church School.
CONGREGATIONAL-DISC PLES. STUDENT GUILD
7:00 P.M.: Congregational Church. Rev. George
Barger will speak on: "What Is Sin?"

-I

4.

The Unusual Tray
Designed by Curoc of
Monterey make
Appropriate Gifts

0

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JOHN LEIDY
537 East Liberty 0 NO 8-6779

(II
SAY -
that everyoneI
should subscribe
to the '54

f;

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday--9:00 A.M.: Matins Service.
10:00 A.M.: Bible Study,
11:00 A.M.: Main Worship Service.
5:20 P.M.: Meet at the Center-Leave from
there to join Presbyterian Student Guild for
Supper and Program.
Wednesday-7:30-8:15 P.M.: Lenten Vesper
Service.

.r

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
W.AnItnr S Orasse Dnttnr

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