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February 11, 1954 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1954-02-11

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PoA fSV T W

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1954

:r

i"l'1' i6 "1 CMS Rl -
--_-

Modern Art
Lecture Set
For Today
British essayist Sir Herbert
Read will deliver the first English
department lecture of the semester
at 4:15 p.m. today in Aud. A, An-
gell Hall, speaking on "The Fun-
damental Conflict in Modern Art."
Describing the forthcoming lec-
ture, Read said that it deals with
literature and the relation of the
artist to society.
Described as one of the leading
spokesmen for a- Freudian expla-
nation of art," Read theorizes that
the creative impulse wells from the
unconscious, quite automatically,
and represents the personality of
the artist rather than his super-
imposed character which is con-
trolled by the unconscious.
One of Read's most famous es-
says deals with this subject, "Sur-
realism and the Romantic Prin-
ciple."
Among Read's dozen books are
two -volumes of poetry, a Words-
worth study, "English Prose Style,"
"Form in Modern Poetry," "The
Meaning of Art," " Phrases of
English Poetry" and "The Green
Child."
Read and Use
Daily Classi ieds

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

I, c
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication ofsthe University 7
of Michigan for which the Michigan r
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-1
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the <
University. Notices should be sent in 7
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 25521
Administration Building.before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (beforeI
11 a.m. on Saturday).
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1954 t
VOL. LXIV, No. 86
Notices
Schools of Education, Music, Natur-
al Resources, and Public Health. Stu-
dents whoreceived marks of I X, or -
"no reports" at the end of their last
semester or summer session of attend-j
ance, will receive a grade of "E" in the
course or courses unless this work is
made up by March 8 in the Schools of
Education, Music, and Public Health.3
In the School of Natural Resources thea
date is March 5. Students wishing an
extension of time beyond this date in
order to make up this work, should file
a petition, addressed to the appropriate
official in their school, with 1513 Admin-
istration Building, where it will be'
transmitted.
Fellowship and Scholarship Applica-
tions for Graduate School will be ac-
cepted through 4 p.m., Mon., Feb. 15.
All supporting credentials including
transcripts and letters of recommenda-
tion must be received by this time.
Later applications cannot be consid-
ered, and the deadline will not be ex-
tended.
Student Organizations planning to be
active during the second semester must
register in the Office of Student Af-
fairs not later than February 26. Forms
for registration have been mailed to
the executive officer of organizations
registered for the first semester. Addi-
tional forms may be secured in the
Office of Student Affairs, 1020 Admin-
istration.
For procedures and regulations re-I
lating to student organizations, refer
to UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS CON-
CERNING STUDENT AFFAIRS, CON-
DUCT, AND DISCIPLINE available in
the Office of Student Affairs.
Veterans who- expect to receive edu-
cation and training allowance under
Public Law 550 (KoreanG.Ir Bill) at
the University of Michigan for the
FIRST TIME must report to 555 Ad-
ministration Building between Feb. 8
and Feb. 12, 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
STANDARDS OF CONDUCT
Enrollment in the University carries
with it obligations in regard to con-
duct, not only inside but also outside
the classroom, and students are ex-
pected to conduct themselves in such a
manner as to be 'a credit both to them-
selves and the University. They are
amenable to the laws governing the
community as well as to the rules and
orders of the University and University
-officials, and they are expected to ob-
serve the standards of conduct approved
by the University.
Whenever a student, group of stu-
dents, society, fraternity, or other stu-
dent organization fails to observe ei-
1'

ther the general standards of conduct
as above outlined or any specific rules
which may be adopted by the proper
University authorities, or conducts him-
self or itself in such a manner as to
make it apparent that he or it is not
a desirable member or part of the Uni-
versity, he or it shall be liable to disci-
plinary action by the proper University
authorities. ("Bylaws," Sec. 8:03.) Spe-
cific rules of conduct which must be
observed are:
Women Guests in Men's Residences:
The presence of women guests in men's
residences, except for exchange and
guest dinners or for social events or
during calling hours approved by the
Office of Student Affairs, is not per-
mitted. This regulation does not ap-
ply to mothers of residents. (Commit-
tee on Student Conduct, January 28,
1947.)
Exchange and guest dinners. Ex-
change dinners are defined as meals in
men's residences or women's residences
attendedrby representative groups of
the other sex. Guest dinners are de-
fined as meals in men's residences and
women's residences attended by guests
who may or may not belong to EUnl-
versity organizations. Exchange and
guest dinners may be held in orga-
nized student residences between 5:30
p.m. and 8 p.m. for week-day dinners
and between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. for Sun-
day dinners. (Committee on Student
Conduct, January 28, 1947.) While
guest chaperons are not required,
groups without resident house directors
must announce these events to the
Office of Student Affairs at least one
day in advance of the scheduled date.)
Calling Hours for Women in Men's
Residences. In University men's resi-
dence halls, daily between 3 p.m. and
10:30 p.m. In Nelson International
House, Psi Upsilon, Alpha Tau Omega,
and Sigma Phi Epsilon Friday from 8
p.m. to 12 p.m.; on Saturday from 2:30
p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and from 9 p.m. to 12
p.m.; Sunday from 1 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.
It is expected that the resident house
director will be presentrduring these
hours. This privilege applies only to
casual calls and not to planned parties,
which must be submitted for approval
to the Office of Student Affairs. Wom-
en callers in men's residences will be
restricted to the main floor of the
residence.)
Intoxicating Beverages. The use or
presence of intoxicating beverages in
student quarters is not permitted.
(Committee on Student Conduct, July
2, 1947). See Appendix C for Michigan
Compiled Laws and Ordinances of the
City of Ann Arbor.
Concerted Absence. Concerted absence
from any appointed duty by a class or
by any number of students together
will be regarded as improper conduct,
and those participating in such action
shall be liable to disciplinary action by
the proper University authorities. ("By-
laws," Sec. 8.04)
Financial Obligations. Proper observ-
ance of financial obligations is deemed
an essential of good conduct, and stu-
dents who are guilty of laxness in this
regard to a degree incompatible with
the general standards of conduct as
set forth in Section 8.03 (p. 29) shall
be liable to disciplinary action by the
proper University authorities.
Students shall pay all accounts due
the University not later than the last
day of classes of each semester or sum-
mer session. Any unpaid accounts at
the close of business on the last day of
classes shall be reported to the Cashier
of the University and the following
action shall be taken: (1) all academic
credits shall be withheld, (2) grades
for the semester or summer session just
completed shall not be released, (3) no
transcript of credits shall be issued, and
(4) students owing such accounts shall
not be allowed to register in any sub-
sequent semester or summer session un-
til payment has been made. University
authorities may request the withdraw-
al of any student who through over-
sight has been allowed to register con-
trary to this regulation. ("Bylaws,"
Sec. 29.10).

for living accommodations for, the se-
mester in an approved rooming house.
Student loans which fall due during
any semester or summer session and
which are not paid or renewed are sub-
ject to this regulation, but loans not
yet due are not included. (Bylaws,"
Sec. 8.06.)
Responsibility for Maintaining Stan-
dards of Conduct. Student organizations
are expected to take all reasonable
measures to promote among their
members conduct consistent with good
taste and to endeavor by all reasonable
means to ensure conformity with the
foregoing standards of conduct.
University students or student or-
ganizations are responsible for their
guests' compliance with the standards
of conduct. (Dean of Students.)
Any student-sponsored function at
which conditions arise that are In-
jurious to the prestige of the University
may be'abolished by the Committee on
Student Affairs. (Regents' Proceedings,
May, 1923.)
It is the joint responsibility of the
chaperonsand the president of the or-
ganization sponsoring a social event to
see that University regulations are ob-
served, particularly those relating to
conduct, presence of women guests, and
use of intoxicants. (Committee on Stu-
dent Affairs, November 13, 1946.)
Penalties. Except as otherwise herein
provided, penalties for violation of
standards of conduct may be in the
form of expulsion, suspension, proba-
tion, withdrawal of special privileges,
imposition of special duties, imposition
of extra hours of required credit, re-
duction of hours of credit, imposition
of ,monetary fines which shall be
deemed proper in a particular case.
Failure to comply with the discipli-
nary order of any disciplinary authori-
ty shall result in suspension until com-
pliance. ("Bylaws," Sec. 8:14).
SOCIAL EVENTS
Social Events sponsored by student
organizations at which both men and
women are to be present must be reg-
istered in the Office of Student Af-
fairs, and are subject to approval by
the Dean of Students. Application
forms and a copy of regulations gov-
erning these events may be secured in
the Office of Student Affairs, 1020 Ad-
ministration Building. Requests for ap-
proval must be submitted to that of-
fice no later than noon of the Mon-
day before the event is scheduled. A
list of approved social events will be
published in the Daily Official Bulletin
on Thursday of each week.
In planning social programs for the
semester, social chairmen will want to
keep in mind the action of the Com-
mittee on Student Affairs which re-
quires that the calendar be kept clear
of student sponsored activities for the
seven days prior to a final examination
period. Final examinations for the pres-
ent semester begin May 31. For the
spring term the calendar will be closed
May 24.
Elementary Teachers. There are over
100 vacancies for elementary teachers
in the Public Schools of Hawaii. Any-
one who is interested and would like
further information on these positions,
should contact the Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 3528 Administration Bldg., Nor-
mandy 3-1511, Ext. 489.
The Following Student Sponsored So-
cial Events are approved for the com-
ing week end:
February 12, 1954-
Delta Chi
Delta Theta Phi
Phi Delta Phi
Phi Gamma Delta
Psi Omega
February 13, 1954-
Alpha Delta Phi
Alpha Kappa Psi
Alpha Tau Omega
Chi Phi
Delta Delta Delta
Delta Sigma Delta
Delta Tau Delta
Delta Theta Phi
Hawaiian Club
Nelson House
Phi Delta Phi
Taylor
Trigon
February 14, 1954-
Alpha Rho ChiI

Delta Theta Phi
Phi Delta. Phi
PERSONNEL INTERVIEWS.
Friday, Feb. 12-
Cliuett, Peabody & Co. will visit the
Bureau of Appointments on Feb. 12 to
interview men June graduates in Bus.
Ad. or LS&A concerning the firm's Sales
Training Program. The company manu-
factures and markets Arrow shirts.Stu-
dents wishing to schedule appointments
may contact the Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 3528 Administration Bldg., Ext.
371.
The Seventh U.S. Civil Service Region
has announced an examination for fill-
ing Clerk positions in the Federal Ser-
vice. No previous experience is required
of applicants.
The Board of U. S. Civil Service Exam-
iners for the Dept. of Agriculture is
offering an examination to qualify un-
dergraduates for appointments as Stu-
dent Trainees in the fields of Soil Con-
servation, Soil Science, or Agricultural
Engineering. The examination is re-
stricted to those students who will not
have completed their full curriculum by
June 30, 1954. The deadline for accept-1
ing applications is March 3, 1954.
The Wisconsin State Service has an-
nounced an examination for the posi-
tion of Accountant III in the Dept. of
State Audit. Qualifications include a
degree with an accounting major plus
4 years of experience in the professional
auditing work. The deadline for filing
application for this exam, which is open
to non-residents, is Feb. 25, 1954.
The American Association of Adver-
tising Agencies will give its annual
Examination for Advertising on Feb. 20,
1954, in Ann Arbor. The deadline for
filing applications to take this adver-
tising aptitude test is Fri., Feb. 12. For
further information contact the Bureau
of Appointments.
Buckman Laboratories, Inc., Mem-
phis, Tenn., . manufacturing chemists,
are interested in receiving applications
from Chemical Engineers graduating in
June.
Josten's of Owatonna, Minnesota,
manufacturers of jewelry and station-
ery, are looking for a recent or June
graduate to fill the position of assist-
ant to the plant engineer in the firm's
Industrial Engineering Department.
The City of Midland, Michigan, has a
vacancy for the position of Instrument
Man in the Engineering Department.
Recent or June graduates in Civil En-
gineering are eligible to apply.
Benson & Benson, Inc., of Princeton,
N.J., an independent public opinion
and market research organization,
would like to hear from men interest-
ed in research in the fields of radio,
readership, market, public relations,
and industrial relations.
Union Carbide & Carbon Corp. in
New York City has announced a cur-
rent list of openings for 1954 grad-
uates including positions in account-
ing, advertising and publicity, credit,
foreign sales, purchasing, traffic, and
production engineering positions abroad.
AmericanAirlines of Chicago, Ill., will
have representatives in Detroit on Feb.
18 and 19 to conduct interviews for
stewardess positions.
For additional information concern-
ing these and other employment op-
portunities, contact the Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3528 Administration Bldg.,
Ext. 371.
Lectures
University Lecture, auspices of the
English Department. Sir Herbert Read
will speak on "The Fundamental Con-
flict in Modern Art," Auditorium A,
Angell Hall, Thurs., Feb. 11, 4:15 p.m.
University Lecture. Professor Meyer
Fortes of Cambridge University will
deliver a University Lecture on "Ritual
Symbolism and Social Organization" on
Fri., Feb. 12, at 4:10 p.m. in Auditorium
A of Angell Hall, The speaker is com-
ing to Michigan under the joint spon-
sorship of the Departments of Sociol-
ogy and Anthropology. He is the author
of several books on the social anthro-
pology of one of the tribes in the
hinterland of the Gold Coast.
Illustrated Lecture. Max Abramovitz,
Deputy Director of Planning for the
United Nations Headquarters Buildings;
(Continued on Page 4)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.94
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Blue Shaeffer pen at registra-
tion Thursday-NO 8-7039, Phil Doug-
lis. )95A
LOST FRIDAY 11:30 a.m. Registration:
Lady's Parker 51 Pen, gray barrel, sil-
ver cap-Robin, NO 2-8894. )96A
LOST-Glasses in blue case with name,
address (commuter), inside. Please
return to Mich. League Desk. )97A
FOR SALE
1940 PLYMOUTH CLUB COUPE-Blue,
radio and heater, new rubber. Excel-
lent condition throughout; 222 W.
Washington. NO 2-4588. )292B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )14B
BABY PARAKEETS-Various colors, $8
each. New and used cages and bird
supplies. Mrs. Ruffins. 582 S. 7th.
)196B
1941 CHRYSLER-4-door, blue; radio,
heater, new tires, '54 license. Lots of
miles! 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)293B
BATTER I ES.
$5 EXCH.
Guaranteed Free Installation
BATTERY STORES ASSOCIATED
Liberty and Ashley
TUXEDO FOR SALE-Practically new.
Size 36. Call NO 2-4236. )2718
1939 PLYMOUTH COUPE-Black; mech-
anically perfect. 222 W. Washington,
NO 2-4588. )2948
GUITAR, LIKE NEW, with case and
music. Call NO 3-8667 evenings. )280B
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Keystone Model A7 16mm movie
camera with F2.7 lens, $55. Purchase
Camera Shop, 1116 So. University,
NO 8-6972. )281B
1941 FORD CLUB COUPE-Blue. Heater
and radio. Mechanically perfect. 222
W. Washington, NO 2-4588. )295B
RECLINING, UPHOLSTERED tapestry
chair with wooden arms and footstool
-fair condition, $10. Two large side-
boards, $8 each, coal hot water heater
with two stovepipes, $7.50-Phone NO
2-9020. Muntz table model 14" TV
set, hardly used, $60. Six compart-
ment Rabbitt Hutch, well built, $15.
)284B
BEAUTIFUL, large, tan genuine leather
shoulder bag, brown silk lining -
like new. Half price. NO 2-2112. )287B
1949 CHEVROLET-4-door, green. Radio,
heater, low mileage. 222. W. Wash-
ington, NO 2-4588. )296B
STAMPS-U.S. or foreign sent on ap-
proval. Price list free. Sharrott, 1039
Grassmere, Far Rockaway 91, N.Y.
t )288B
9' x 12' BRAIDED, wool dval rug. New.
$75.00. Call 2-6871. )282B

FOR SALE
1937 CHRYSLER-2-door, well cared for.
Greased regularly, good motor, bat-
tery, and tires; reliable transportation,
only $75. Phone NO 2-9020. )286B
1950 PLYMOUTH-Radio and heater, 4-
door. New license and all taxes paid!
$595. 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)297B
FOR SALE-Two brand new re-capped
snow tires. Sizes 6.50 x 16. Phone
NO 2-2038. )290B
FUR JACKET-Size 12, dyed squirrel,
excellent condition. Ypsilanti 2595W.
)291B
GOOD TRANSPORTATION-1939 Hud-
son, 2-door, 4 good tires, heater, $60.
Bob Weinbaum, NO 3-4187. )289B
FOR RENT
UNFURNISHED 4 room flat for rent,,
adults only. Heat and water furn-
ished, 8985 Island Lake Rd. 1 mile
west of Dexter. HA 6-9411. )23C
ROOMS for Male Students near Union.
Cooking privileges. Call NO 3-8454.
) 40D
ROOMS for Male Students near Union.
Cooking privileges. Call NO 3-8454.
) 40D
ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUEST ROOMS
Rooms by Day or Week
Campus Tourist Homes. Ph. NO 3-8454
518 E. Williams St. (near State)
) 25D
DOUBLE ROOM near campus available
now. Call 2-9625. 1111 White. )39D
TWO ROOM BASEMENT APT.-Suitable
for two or three. Private bath en-
trance. Walls of cedar panel. Men
only. Call Bob at NO 8-8993. )28C
DOUBLE ROOMS-Men students near
campus. Board if desired. Call NO
8-8993, ask for Hse. Mgr. )43D
FOR RENT-Close in 2 room suite with
sink and hot water. Also single room.
917 E. Huron. )27D
ONE LARGE SINGLE room near campus
-maid service, refrigerator privileges.
Call NO 2-7108. )41D
MAN WANTED
Few hours work for part of room rent.
House near campus; Union. 509 South
Division. )42D
ROOM AND BOARD
LIVE IN SOUTHEAST CAMPUS AREA?
Your spring board arrangements at
1617 Washtenaw. No experience nec-
essary 42.10/day for three meals. Call
NO 3-2360-Ask for Hse. Mgr. )14E
STILL, A FEW ROOMS or room and
board at 1617 Washtenaw. Board
$2.10/day for three meals. Room
$30.00/mo., free linen and daily por-
ter service. Liberal board credit pol-
icy. 1617 Washtenaw, Phone NO 3-2360;
ask for House Manager. )13E
BOARDERS wanted for ,lunch and din-
ner. Call NO 3-8581 or inquire 808
Tappan. )12E
AT LAST IT'S HERE! A place to get
three square meals for only $2.05 per
day. Liberal rebate policy. Call Gene
or Erine at NO 8-8993. )17E
PERSONAL
HAWAII ANYONE? 47 days in Hawaii.
Student tour leaves June 21st. Study
University of Hawaii. Also non-stu-
dent and short tour. Mrs. Edna
Strachan. NO 2-5571.

PERSONAL
EUROPE $995
66 wonderful days,*escorted tour vis-
iting 8 countries. Free information.
Florence Coveyou, 17311 Patton, De-
troit 19, Michigan. )56F
A FEW DOLLARS ($1-$4) buy many
weekly Valentines ALL YEAR 'ROUND.
Our shopping service recommends
baseball mags for Marilyn Monroes
and boxing journals for Za Za's.
Phone Student Periodical, NO 5-1843.
)58P
TRANSPORTATION
SHARE THE RIDE by car from Detroit
every day. Call KE 3-7212. )420
HELP WANTED
SUMMER CAMP JOB in Ann Arbor area.
Men, women, couples, 4 weeks or 8
.weeks. Phone NO 3-0067. )61H
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITERS! Portable and Standard
for rent, sales, and service.
MORRILLS

4,

RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono and T.V.
Fast and Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.V.
"Student Service"
1214 So. Univ., Ph. NO 8-7942
1 % blocks east of East Eng.
314 State St., Phone NO 8-7177

)51

WASHING, Finished Work, and Hand
Ironing. Buff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Ph. NO 2-9020. )21
ALTERATIONS for ladies' dresses, suits,
and coats. Alta "Graves, NO 2-2678.
)261
MISCELLANEOUS
GETTING ENGAGED?
Strapped student offers one diamond
ring. Two-thirds ct. Flawless. Ap-
praisal $450. Sacrifice for $300. Phone
NO 2-7409. )22L
PIANO IN HOME wanted for practicing
several days a week. Call NO 8-6040.
)21L
BRAND NEW
Special rates to Newsweek ($2), Re-
porter ($3.50), Mademoiselle ($2.50),
and other mags. Phone Student
Periodical, NO 5-1843. )231,

4

BUY AS,
YOU RENT!
ANN ARBOR
OFFICE MACHINES
211 East Liberty
Phone 8727
Starting FRIDAY
M-G-M's TOP LOVE R
MUSICAL SPECTACLE f*

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

j',

HILL AUDITORIUM
Friday, Feb. 12th
7:15 and 9:30
$1.00 - $1.50-- $2.00
Tickets available at
HILL AUDITORIUM
BOX OFFICE, 10 A.M.-5 P.M.

A:

Ending
Tonight

Shows at
1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.

WARNER siRS aovsM +
CINEMAC
w WARNERCOLOR AMC STEREOPHON4IC SOUND

IML

NOw!

1CoHIGEgn
TH'EAT'R

Mats 50c
Eves. 80c

,,
IrW,

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1

Coming
FRIDAY

Alec Guinness

"THE CAPTAIN'S
PARADISE"

La

Cinena SL I d,
presents
THE MUDLARK
with
IRENE DUNNE ALEC GUINNESS
ANDREW ROY
Thursday and Friday ... 7 and 9
It Happened One Night
with
CLARK GABLE CLAUDETTE COLBERT
WALTER CONNOLEY
Saturday 7 and 9 - Sunday 8 only
I

I

I

t

'

DAY and NIGHT
CLASSES FORMING.
Uses ABCs'.
! WEEKS#1ti
TYING OPTIONA.
Over 400 Schools in U. S. will assist you in review or placement.
ENROLL TODAY IN FEBRUARY CLASS.
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE

I

227 S. Ingalls
NO 8-6300

1t

Box Office opens Feb. 15
MAIL ORDERS NOW
Adm. $1.20 and 90c

50c

ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM

Founded 1915 Phone NO 8-7831

State and Williams Sts.

I

,I GRILLER STRING QUARTET

I

.

.,

I

DO YOU HAVE A
inQinw

SIDNEY GRILLER, 1st Violin
JACK O'BRIEN, 2nd Violin

PHILIP BURTON, Viola
COLIN HAMPTON, Cello

and the I
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