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March 14, 1954 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-03-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 14, 1954

ii

BRUMFIELD AND BRUMFIELD':
TWO Names Add Up To One Person
By JON SOBELOFF I~t.
"I'm nuts, I admit it," said
Brumfield and Brumfield" as he
miled and leaned back in his chair
n the cluttered second floor back "
oom of his mimeographing and:
inding office.
"I'm both Brumfields," Paul D.
3rumfield explained. Stepping to
file in the front office, he pro-
luced a legal document showing
is "registratoin to do business un-
er an assumed name."
IF YOU SAY Brumfield and .
3rumfield twice maybe you will re-
nember it once, Brumfield point-
d out. "And in the telephone di-
ectory, Brumfield and Brum-:
jeld" in black type goes clear
,cross the page." :-
Brumfield credits his friend
Regent Roscoe O. Bonisteel with " :
the idea of the double name for :
the firm.>
The canny 62-year-old business- >
nan started out as a traveling re- :} ""+4
resentative setting up farm ma- " { < :
hinery for an American corpora- . .}
ion, in South America, Asia and .
all over the world."
"I'was what they call an expert,"
e recalled. "There ain't no such .t
fimal."

DRAFTED IN Jackson (his
home office) during World War I,
he got acquainted with many men
from Washtenaw County. So when
he came to Ann Arbor in 1923, he
stayed awhile, taking a job with
a printing firm.
The job lasted seven years un-
til "I was fired and went into
business for myself," he said.
Waring To Give
Journalism Talk
Houstoun Waring, editor of the
Littleton, Colo., "Independent,"
will speak on "Building a Tradition
of Fair Play" at 3 p.m. tomorrow
in the Rackham Amphitheater.
The lecture is fourth in the ser-
ies "The Press and Civil Liberties
in Crisis" sponsored by the jour-
nalism department.
In 1950 Waring and the "Inde-
pendent" were singled out by the
State Department as the model
weekly newspaper of the nation to
be featured in a motion picture
dealing with freedom of the press.
Waring established a journalism
department at the University of
Denver and served as its chairman
until 1939.
ENDING TODAY
PKaemunt pSsenls
GREGORY PECK
AUDREY HEPBURN
VWilliamWyler
Also

--Daily-Dean Morton
BRUMFIELD RELAXES AMID OFFICE CLUTTER
.>

He's had his own offices ever
since.
Julia Cross, "just about the best
typist in the country," has worked'
for Brumfield about 20 years. His
other assistant, Mrs. Ruth Brown
has also been with him 20 years.
* * *
BRUMFIELD IS the man who
binds masters and doctoral theses'
and Hopwood entries for students
here. "We just do the quick jobs
here-if someone comes in with an
old Bible, I send them somewhere
else."
And Brumfield and Brumfield
does mimeographing. Brumfield
ran through a stack of orders as
an example. Included were jobs
for the Ann Arbor Amateur
Hockey Association, American
Legion, the Women's Christian
Temperance Union, the Ameri-
can Association of University
Professors, the Ann Arbor Figure
Skating Club and a gas station.
The mimeographing jobs are run
off an ordinary hand-cranked ma..
chine. "It's got a motor, but un-
less you've got a suction feed, you
waste too much paper," he ex-
plained.
ORPH EUM
HELD OVER!
Sunday and Eves. 95c
--Exifingly DifferentIN
"FEATURE-LENGTH
TRUE-LIFE ADVENTUREI A^
TECHNICOLOR

"But we can't turn out 3000
pages an hour by hand, with no
blanks, flo waste, no nothing,"
Brumfield said "They think we're
crazy but we have to make a pro-
fit."
"Every time we type a page, one
mistake on a stencil can mean 2,-
400 errors. If I do say so, we've
done an excellent job," he added.
* * *
HE DESCRIBES his typical
work-day: "I get up at six, I come
in and eat breakfast and sit
around and do the crossword puz-
zles 'till about eight, then I hang
around a little while after six at
night, go downtown to eat and
come back to my room across the
hall from the office."
"It's ridiculous," Brumfield
said, but we practically have
not advertised in 15 years." He
finds a letter to prospective cus-
tomers more effective.
"I don't look hungry, do I?" he
quipped. "Of course every busi-
ness should try to grow, but there
are taxes and government reports
to fill out and if you take an ad
with one magazine you have to
take one with the mall."
HIGH TAXES disturb Brum-
field. "Roosevelt ruined the coun-
try. He spent money when we did-
n't have it ,so we'll have to pay
for years and years."
"Professors are all pretty good
guys," Brumfield finds. He re-
called one day in 1936 when Prof.
Edgar N. Durfee of the Law
School was sitting in Brumfield's
office and a law student came up
to see if the text for Prof. Dur-
fee's class was ready.
Not noticing the professor, the
student asked if "Durfee's joke
book was ready yet."
When Prof. Durfee answered
"not yet," "the guy nearly faint-
ed," Brumfield remembered.
On April 1, Brumfield will sell
his business to Mrs. Cross. He'll
stay around a month to help out.
"Then I'm going to take a little
time off," he said.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily.-Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive \notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday).
SUNDAY, MARCH 14, 1954
VOL. LXIV, No. 113
Notices
General Faculty Meeting. There will
be a general faculty meeting at 4:15
p.m., Mon., Mar. 15, in the Rackham
Lecture Hal, to permit the President
to discuss with the members of the fa-
culty the state of the University. All
members of the teaching staff, includ-
ing teaching assistants and teaching
fellows, are invited to attend.
The second Hatcher Open House of
the semester is scheduled for Wednes-
day, Mar. 17, from 4 to 6 at the Presi-
dent's home. Everyone is cordially In-
vited to attend and meet President and
Mrs. Hatcher.
English Majors. The Department of
English of the University of Kansas
is seeking applicants of high quality
for positions as teachers of Freshman
and Sophomore English and as parti-
cipants in a program of training as
college teachers of Composition and
Literature. Appointees to these posi-
tions will combine studies leading to
M.A. and Ph.D. degrees with on-the-
job training.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin-
istration Bldg., NO 3-1511, Ext. 489.
Mortgage Loans. The University is in-
terested in making first mortgage loans
as investments of its trust funds. The
Investment Office, 3015 Administration
Building, will be glad to consult with
anyone considering building or buying
a home, or refinancing an existing
mortgage or land contract. Appoint-
ments may be made by calling Exten-
sion 2606.
Men Camp Counselors. Mr. Herb
Twining of camp Al-Gon-Quin from
Burt Lake, Michigan, will be interview-
ing persons competent in various camp
activities on Mon. Mar. 15, from 3 to
5 p.m. in Room 3-B of the Michigan
Union. He is primarily interested in
specialists in different Areas, such as
music, individual sports, boating, etc.
Interested persons should contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin-
istration Bldg., NO 2-1511, Ext. 2614
for appointments.
Teaching Candidates: Beginning Mon.,
Mar. 15, the following School Repre-
sentatives will be at the Bureau of
Appointments for interviews:
Monday, March 15 Garden City, Mich-
igan-Men's P. E. (Eem Spv.), Kdg.-
8th, typing, Ind. Arts, Librarian.
Tuesday, March 16 Saginaw, Mich-
gan-Elementary-ail levels. Morrice,
Michigan-Vocal and Instr. Music, 1st
grade, Football Coach. Grand Rapids,
Michigan-Id. Arts. Inst. Music, Speech
Correction, Spec. Education, Jr. Hi
Core, Jr. College-Engineering, Jr. Col-
lege-Science, Elementary.
Wednesday, Mar. 17 Royal Oak, Michl-
igan-Elementary, Secondary. Gaines,
Michigan-Eng., Commercial, Math &
Science, Elementary, Band & Vocal Di-
rector, Coach, 7th grade. Bay City, Mich-
igan-Kdg-8th, Spec. Education, H.S.
Eng., Science, Chemistry, Jr. College
Chemistry.
Thurs., March 18 Pontiac, Michigan-
Elementary, Elem Librarian (Head). De-
troit, Michigan (Public Schools)-Ele-
mentary & Secondary. There will be a
general meeting held at 4 p.m. in 2402
Mason Hall. Mr. George Baker will
speak on the Detroit school system. A
welcome!
For appointments, contact the Bur-
eau of Appointments, NO 3-1511, Ext.
489.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS.
The Atlas Powder Co. has openings
for Mechanical Engineers, Chemists
(B.S., M.S: or Ph.D.) and Chemical En-
gineers in the company's Darco Depart-
ment in Marshall, Texas.
The Trane Co., La Crosse, Wis., man-
ufacturers of heating, ventilating, air
conditioning and heat transfer equip-
ment, have announced a list of em-
ployment opportunities for engineer-
ing graduates in technical sales, pro-

duct engineering and research, and in-
dustrial engineering or production.
Buckman Laboratories, Inc., manu-
ufacturing chemists, Memphis, Tenn.,
are interested in receiving applications
from organic chemistry June graduates
(Ph.D.) for a position in their research
laboratory.
The Barnes .Construction Co., Inc.,
Grand Rapids, Mich., has an immediate
vacancy in its Engineering Dept. for a
man with background in estimating,
drafting and structural engineering.
The company is also interested in hir-
ing a Civil Engineering June graduate
to train for a top position.
For additional information about
these and other employment opportu-
nities, contact the Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 3528 Administration Bldg., Ext.
371.
SUMMER PERSONNEL REQUESTS.
Modern Homes Corp., manufacturer
of prefabricated homes with plants in
Dearborn, Mich., and Port Jervis, N.Y.,
will have summer positions open for
both assemblers and general laborers.
Frankford Arsenal, Philadelphia, Pa.,
is accepting applications from stu-
dents in Engineering, Physics, and
Chemistry for summer employment.
For further information concerning
these opportunities, contact the Bu-
reau of appointments, 3528 Adminis-
tration Bldg., Ext. 371.
Lectures
University Lecture, auspices of the
Kelsey Museum of Archaeology. Dr.
Ahmed Fakhry, Professor of History of
Ancient Egypt and the East, University
of Cairo, Egypt, will lecture on "The
Excavations of the Pyramid of Snefru,
(1950-1953)." Illustrated. Tues., Mar. 16,
4:15 p.m., Rackham Amphitheater.
University Lecture in Journalism. The
fourth lecture in the series The Press
and Civil Liberties in Crises will be giv-
en by Houstoun Waring, editor of the
Littleton, Colorado, Independent. His
lecture, entitled, "Building a Tradition
of Fair Play," will be given at 3 p.m.
Mon., Mar. 15, in the Rackham Amphi-
theater. The lecture and coffee hour at
4 p.m. in the Conference Room of the
Journalism Department, Mason Hall,
are open to the public.
The Department of Aeronautical En-
gineering will sponsor two lectures by
Professor J. Ackeret, Professor of Aero-
dynamics at the Swiss Federal Insti-
tute of Technology, Zurich, Switzer-
land, Mon., Mar. 15, AEROTHERMO-
DYNAMIC EFFECTS and Tues., Mar.
16, FLOW THROUGH STRAIGHT AND
BENT DIFFUSORS. Both lectures will
be given in Auditorium C of Angell
Hall, at 4 p.m. All interested are invit-
ed to attend.
Academic Notices
Psychology 55, Section 3 will meet at
9 a.m., instead of 10 a.m., Tues., Mar.
16, in 2429 Mason Hall.
May Festival Lecture Series. A series
of six lectures by Professor Glenn D.
McGeoch of the University School of
Music will concentrate on a study and
analysis of the major works to be per-
formed in the 1954 May Festival Pro-
grams. Class limited. Early registration
advised. Six successive weeks, omitting
April 6. Registration fee $6. Tues., Mar.
16, 7 p.m., 206 Burton Tower. (Regis-
tration for the series may be made in
4501 Administration Building on State
Street during University office hours.)
Concerts
Organ Recital by Robert Noehren,
University Organist, 4:15, Sunday aft-
ernoon; March 14. During this series
Mr. Noehren is featuring the "Eighteen
Great Chorales" of Bach, and his sec-
ond program will continue with seven
of the famous works. Other Bach com-
positions to be played are: Toccata,
Adagio and Fugue in C major, Can-
zona in D minor, and Prelude and Fu-
gue in D minor. The general public will
be admitted without charge.
Program of American Music spon-
sored by Sigma Alpha Iota and the
School of Music, will be presented at
8:30, Sunday evening, March 14, in Au-
ditorium A, Angell Hall. The program
will open with Griffes' Sonata, played
by Frances Elaine Hauss, pianist, fol-
lowed by Three Songs from Jewish Life,
by Elaine Friedman, senior composition
student, performed by Jane Townsend,
pianist, and Meredyth Manns, mezzo-
soprano. The concert wil continue with
Piston's Suite for Oboe and Piano, with
Sylvia Sherman, oboist, and Ellen Sher-
man, pianist; Copland's Sonata for Vio-
lin and Piano, with Diana Sims, violin-
ist, and Anita Carlton, pianist. The Sig-
ma Alpha Iota Chorus, directed by Es-
ther McGlothlin, and accompanied by
Linda Reck, pan idst, will bring the
program to a close with Hendl's "Lone-
(Continued on Page 4)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.94
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure,5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND - PARKER '51 pen in Angell
Hall. Call Yvonne Bristol, NO 2-2591.
)114A
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )14B
A MEDIUM blue-grey gabardine suit.
Single breasted, sport style. Like new,
size 40 regular. Very reasonably price
ed. Call NO 3-1904 after 8 p.m. on
weekdays only. Ask for Steve. )299B
1946 MERCURY CLUB COUPE-Radio
and heater. Loaded with extras. 222
W. Washington, Phone 2-4588. )321B
BATTERIES $5 EXCHANGE
Guaranteed - Free Installation
BATTERY STORES ASSOCIATION
Liberty and Ashley - NO 3-5113
)329B
RECLINING, UPHOLSTERED, tapestry
chair with wooden arms and footstool
-fair condition, $10. Two large side-
boards, $6 each, can be painted. Coal
hot water heater with two stovepipes,
$7.50. Muntz table model 14" TV set
with antennae hardly used, $65. Ma-
jestic portable radio with inside and
outside aerial, $50. Pocket size radio
without batteries, $15. Phone NO
2-9020. )328B
1946 FORD 2-door, y-8, black; radio
and heater, good transportation.
Huron Motor Sales, 222 W. Washing-
ton, NO 2-4588. )335B
1947 DODGE, 2-door. Blue; radio and
heater-new tires, low mileage. Very
clean. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington. NO 2-4588. )334B
1946 CHEVROLET ARROW - 2-door;
green. Radio, heater; excellent trans-
portation. Huron Motor Sales, 222
West Washington. NO 2-4588. )342B
1950 FORD CLUB COUPE-Blue. Radio
and heater; 30,000 miles; one owner.
Sharpest used car in Ann Arbor!
Huron Motor Sales, 222 W. Washing-
ton. NO 2-4588. )343B
FIREPLACE WOOD-Oak and Hickory,
any length. Phone NO 3-4575. )347B
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Labelle 300W automatic slide projector
with case; $75. Purchase Camera Shop,
1116 S. University; NO 8-6972. )345B
BABY PARAKEETS which can be easily
trained to talk and whistle; also
canaries. 562 S. 7th. Phone NO 3-5330.
)344B
TUXEDO-Also Business Suit, med. blue,
hard finish. Both 40 reg., double
breasted, like new. NO 3-8116. )348B

OVERNIGHT GUEST ROOMS
Rooms by Day or Week
Campus Tourist Homes. Ph. NO 3-8454
518 E. Williams St. (near State)
)25D
LARGE PLEASANT ROOM-Completely
equipped for light housekeeping, elec-
tric refrigerator, electric plate, all
utilities. Must have a car. $10.00 a
week. Phone NO 2-9020. )53D
FOR RENT
SIAMESE CAT-Stud service, call)NO
2-9020. )33C
FOR RENT-Nice room, equipped for
light housekeeping with hot and cold
running water, electric plate, all utili-
ties. Must have a car. Phone NO
2-9020. $8 for single, $10 for double,
per week. )34C
ROOM AND BOARD
3 MEALS A DAY for $2. The best cook
in town t Close to campus. Call NO
3-1841 or drop in at 1108 Hill St. )19E
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED-Rides Home-Ft. Lauderdale,
Florida, Spring Vacation. Will share
expenses. Call 201 Cooley, E. Q. )470
HELP WANTED
CAMP COUNSELORS WANTED! - Men
with experience in handling boys;
nine week summer camp. Waterfront,
Archery, Maintenance, General camp-
ing experience. Call NO 2-9454 eve-
nings. )74H
ALTERATIONS
ALTERATIONS on ladies garments. Ph.
NO 2-2678. 510 Catherine Street near
State. Alta Graves.

ROOMS FOR RENT

BUSINESS SERVICES
APPLICATION PHOTOGRAPHS while
you wait at SNIDER STUDIOS,,213 So.
Main St. )162
TYPEWRITERS! Portable and Standard
for rent, sales, and service.
MORRILLS
PIANO SERVICE - Tuning, repairing,
World guaranteed. Call University Mu-
sic House, NO 8-7515. )271
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home -- Portable
Phono and T.V.
Fast and Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.V.
"Student Service"
1214 So. Univ., Ph. NO 8-7942
11s blocks east of East Eng. )51
WASHING, Finished Work, and Hand
Ironing. Buff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Ph. NO 2-9020. )21

4

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AND
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DAILY
CLASSI FIEDS

41
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