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February 27, 1954 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-02-27

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1954

EI!IRA RR:

ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT HEAD:
Sharfman Ends 40 Years Service

SL Books
Students may pick up their
unsold books from 9 a.m. to
noon today in the Student Book
Exchange near Angell Hall
Study Hall.j
Books not picked up at this
time will become the property
of the Exchange.'
ReadingAid
Helps Marks
Interest in the University re-
medial reading program is "snow-
balling," according to Dr. Donald
E. P. Smith, Chief of the Univer-
sity Reading Services.
When the program was opened
last year, 447 persons received aid,
while this year more than 550 peo-
ple will take advantage of the pro-
gram. Past students apparently
are recommending the course to
their friends, since this year there
has been a significant increase in
students who have inquired about
the program without advice from
professors or counselors, he said.
* * *
STUDENT. evaluation rates the
course highly. A survey of students
indicates 92 percent class members
believe the course improved their
reading ability and 75 percent feel
their grades improved after taking
the course.
A study taken last year show-
ed only 17 percent of those on
the remedial reading program
were on academic probation
while 51 percent of the total
freshmen class had dropped
from school or were on proba-
tion.
Average reading improvement in
the course is 55 percent, and the
survey shows that not only is the
improvement retaihed, but con-
tinues to rise.
Second session of classes given this
semester will open the last week
in March with registration open-
ing the week before spring vaca-
tion.
Students desiring to enter the
course may make appointments forl
consultation in Rm. 210 of the
Student Legislature Bldg.
Symposium
Pro r m Set

'LOUSVILLE TIMES':

Seek Driving

Editor Blasts Young Journalists*

Ban Change

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is an inter-
view with Norman E. Isaacs. promi- "Until they can straighten
nent newspaperman and managing their internal problems, they
editor of the "Louisville Times.") continue straight downhill."

out
will

By SHIRLEY KLEIN
Sitting in his unpretentious office
in the Courier-Journal and Louis-
ville Times Corporation building,
Norman E. Isaacs, managing edi-
tor of the "Louisville Times," dis-
cussed several criticisms of many
of today's young reporters.
He blasted young journalists for
having "no judgment," and "too
fancy a notion of the newspaper
business." They "don't cover stor-
ies thoroughly," and leave "unan-
swered questions." "They do bet- r
ter on features than on news
stories." "Women are all right," he
explained, "if one is not reliant'
on mobility."
* *
"IF I HAVE a criticism of the1
young people today, it is only that
too many of them seem to be
thinking in terms of security than
of opportunity.
"I simply cannot understand.
the youngster who comes into
journalism - or into anything1
else for that matter-and starts7
watching the clock his first week.
These are the people who have
put a limit on what they will do.
Don't put limits on anything-in
your Americanism, your work, or
your future," he warned.
Commenting on the completion
of Eisenlhower's first year as presi-
dent, the former AP Managing Ed-
itors' Association chief noted, "He
hasn't accomplished anything yet,
but he is trying hard."
Stevenson, he pointed out is still
"top dog" in the Democratic Par-
ty. "That's all they've got right'
now, although it is possible to
build up someone in three years."
THE HARD - hitting straight
forward newspaperman declared
that "the French have lost their
power" and "are morally corrupt."

The recent Congressional in-
vestigations of college students
and faculty members the dy-
namic journalist with iron grey
hair termed "a bunch of non-
sense." "I have nothing against
investigations. I think they are
a right and proper function of
Congress.
"I do, however, challenge some

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of the methods-methods which'
result in smears. rather than in
fact-finding. The people who'
would put limits on Americanism
are the very people who have con-'
fused license with liberty.
"I hate Communism for what it
has done to the human spirit-for
its murder and pillage, for its
treachery, for its crushing of the
human soul. Yet for all this, I do
not think it was any great crime
for Americans to have played
around with Communism, or even
to have joined it. I think they were
fools, but I always thought that
an American had a right to make
a fool of himself if he so pleased."
Isaacs advised, not long ago dur-
ing a journalism conference at In-
diana University, "I don't care
what it is you choose to think-
but go ahead and think it-and say
it out loud. And give other men'
the right to say what they think.

_Continued from Pge 1)
complete removal of the ban to
exemption of seniors and those
over 21.
"These proposals were sub-
mitted to the Regents in May,
1953 and have been before them
since that time. It is now Feb-
ruary,'1954 and no action has
been taken in spite of the fact
that these proposals have been
characterized by the adminis-
tration as 'very fine work by the
students who drew them up.'
"On behalf of the entire stu-
dent body the Student Legisla-
ture urges the Regents to take
final action on these proposals at
their next meeting and to accept
one of the modifications that the
Student Legislature has offered."
'Michigan Report'

&k

Dorm an Exhibit
To Open Today
An exhibit of 100 water color
and pen and ink drawings by
Margaret Dorman will open at 1
p.m. today in the International
Center library and in the front
rooms of the Madeline Pound
House, 1024 Hill St.
These paintings of European life
will be on display there until
March 6, when they will be moved
to the Lane Hall library until
March 13.

{

"That's the kind of proud and How foreign students are taught
unafraid America we once had- English by the University in eight
and which we can have again, if weeks will be featured on "Michi-
.you will only have the courage to gan Report," the University's tele-
step forth and take the opportuni- vision program at 5:45 p.m. today
ty that will be yours, he added. over WWJ-TV, Detroit.

PROF. I. LEE SHARFMAN STUDIES IN HIS OFFICE

ed professors," with the title
Henry Carter Adams University
Professor of Economics. Adams
had been the department's first
chairman.1
From almost the beginning of1
his scholarly career he has been
internationally recognized as a
foremost expert on matters of
public regulation of business, and
particularly the regulation of rail-
roads and other forms of trans-
port.
He has written many books and
articles, of which the outstanding
is probably his five-volume study,
"The Interstate Commerce Com-
mission," for which he was award-
ed the James Barr Ames Prize by
the Faculty of Harvard Law
School.
AMONG the numerous recogni-
tions of his distinguished scholar-
ship have been his selection as
Henry Russel Lecturer in 1943, as
President of the American Eco-
nomics Association in 1945, and
as President of the Michigan
Academy of Science, Arts and Let--
ters in 1953.
Prof. Shar'fman's career as a,
scholar has often been inter-
rupted by service in national af-
fairs. He has intermittently serv-
ed on various national boards
and committees. Since 1936 the
professor has served periodically
as arbitrator and fact-finder in
railroad and labor dispute cases.
His forcefulness, elequence, and
the meticulous care of his prepara-
tion have always been evident in
the classroom as well. His col-
leagues marvelled that after 40
I Hatcher Tea .. .
University President and Mrs.
Harlan H. Hatcher will hold the
second of a series of monthly open
houses for University faculty,
staff, and townspeople from 4 to
6 p.m. tomorrow at the President's
house.

years, he still spent several hours
preparing for every class.
Generations of students have
been amazed at his sentences,
which are often of tremendously
complex structure and of unbe-
lievable length, yet always turn
out at the end to have been
beautifully constructed and clear
in meaning.
Serious and devoted as he has'
been in his official duties, those
that know him well like to speak
of another side of his character.
When relaxing at the University
club, or entertaining in his home,
he displays -a warmly gracious and
genial informality. Some ten years
ago he became an avid bridge fan
and rarely since has he been ab-
sent from a bridge table at the
University Club during the noon
hour.
Professor and Mrs. Sharfman
are relaxing this winter in Flori-
da. But those, however, who know
him expect that before long his
vigorous presence will be felt
around the University.
4Ul,
Adolescents
Survey Set
For Spring

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Sts.
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 AM., 9:00 A.M.
Sunday at 8-9:30 A.M., 11-12.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings 7:30 P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in Father Richard Center.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205. Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M.: Morning Service.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service.

Cinema Guild
Student Legislature Cinema
Guild will feature Fredric
March and Florence Eldridge
in "Christopher Columbus" at
7 and 9 p.m. today and 8 p.m.
tomorrow in Architecture Aud-
itorium.
Price of admission is 50 cents.

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"Women in the World of Man"
has been chosen the topic for the
University's 1954 Summer Sym-
posium.,
Offered as an annual feature of'
the summer session, the symposi-
um deals each year wiith a differ-
ent problem.
This year's program will bring
outstanding lecturers in fields of
art, literature, employment, home-
community relations and educa-;
Lion to the campus.
Also scheduled are an art exhib-
it, possible films and a play, and
panel discussions by faculty mem-
bers.
The symposium may be elected
as a seminar course for summer
students, for two hours' credit. I

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Why did at least 878 local ju-
veniles break the law in the past
year?.
Answers to this and the many
other problems concerning ado-
lescents will be sought in April
by the University Social Research
Center in a nation-wide survey of
boys between 14 and 16 years old.
FIRST national survey of its
kind, the study will be done for the
Boy Scouts of America to provide
scientifically valid information to
help it understand needs of such'
boys more completely.
A highly thorough study,
the survey will try to determine
what internal and external pres-
sures motivate our young, how
adult restrictions and group at-
titudes affect them and if there
are any observable patterns of
behaviour.

USNIV.S'ON
SEVEN FOR uMs
WEEKS ONLY t X
SIXTH HOWARD TOUR
ANNUAL THE ORIGINAI TOUR
SEASON ALL INCLUSIVE PROGRAM
for information, consult
MRS. EDNA STRACHAN
1415 Cambridge Rd.
Ann Arbor, Mich.
Phone NO 3-4180 or NO 2-5571

THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY in Ann Arbor
presents Series of Introductory Talks on Theosophy
every Wednesday at 8 P.M.
Place: 736 So. State St., Telephone NO 2-6295
Topic for next Wednesday, March the 3rd:
"Evolution of Life and Form follows Involution"
Public is cordially invited.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 10:45 A.M.: Worship: "On Joining
the Human Race,"' Mr. Abbey preaching.
10:20 A.M.. Student Seminar.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M.: Program: Prof. William P. Alston
will speak on "Personal Ethics.",
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily.
THE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw, Phone NO 2-0085
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian Adult Group-"Inter,
group Relationships in Ann Arbor."
11:00 A.M.: Services of Worship-Rev. John H.
Morgan of Flint as guest preacher on: "Uni-
tarian Prospects."
7:30 P.M.: Unitarian Students-transportation
from Lane Hall at 7:15 P.M. to the church.
Panel: Tom Harrison, Roger Wilkins, Blue
Carstenson, Neil Weller, and Chris Christman
on: "Prejudice."

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 North Division St.
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Dr. Robert H. Whitaker, Chaplain for
Student Fourdation
Mrs. Elizabeth M. Davis, Social Director
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Commentary.
(Student Breakfast, Canterbury House, fol-
lowing both of these services.)
10:15-10:45: Junior High Classes.
11:00 A.M.: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer and Sermon.
4:30 P.M.: Student Confirmation Class.
6:00P.M.: Student Supper Club, Canterbury
House.
7:00 P.M.: Adult Confirmation Class.
8:00 P.M.: Evening Prayer and Commentary.
During the Week: ASH WEDNESDAY, 7 A.M.,
10:15 A.M., 12:10 P.M. Penitential Office
and Holy Communion, 4 P.M. Church School
Family Service, Chapel, 5:15 P.M. Evening
Prayer, Chapel, 8 P.M. Choral Litany in Pro-
cession and Sermon; Daily in Lent, 5:15 P.M.
Evening Prayer, Chapel; Tuesdays in Lent 10
A.M. Holy Communion, Chapel; Thursdays,
7 A.M. Holy Communion; Fridays, 12:10 P.M.
Holy Communion; Saturdays in Lent, 8:30
A.M. Holy Communion, Chapel; Student Tea
on Tuesdays and Fridays at Canterbury House
4-5:15 P.M.; Canterbury Club meets on Fri-
day at 7:30 P.M. in Canterbury House.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Sermon: "The Hope of Prayer."
Nursery for children during service.
9:45 A.M.: Church School.
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
6:00 P.M.: Supper meeting in Pilgrim Hall of
- the Congregational Church. Miss Jean Walker
will speak on: "The Vocation of Christian
Studentship."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Two worship oppor-
tunities, with Holy Communion in bpth services.
Pre-Lenten sermon by the pastor, "Lord,
Whither Goest Thou?"
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta Supper.
Sunday at 7:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, is sponsoring a free showing in the
Chapel of "I Behold His Glory," a 55 min.
sound-color movie of the last days of Christ's
earthly life. Public cordially' invited.
Wednesday, 12:30to 12:55: Ash Wednesday
noonday Devotion, with sermonette by the
pastor.
Wednesday, 7:30: Ash Wednesday Lenten Vesper
Service, with sermon by the pastor.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone 7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Pastor and
Student Counselor
9:45 A.M.:, The Student Class discusses "What
Students Can Believe About Race."
11:00 A.M.: TheMorning WorshipService.
"Separate People"-Rev. Loucks.
6:00 P.M.: The Guild Cabinet meets at the Guild
House.
6:45 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild. A student
panel will present a program on "Personal De-
votions."

,,., .
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ENGINEERING

Engineering Notice
The Glenn L. Martin Company repre-
sentative will visit the campus. on March
1 and 2, 1954 to discuss opportunities for
graduating seniors of the School of Engi-
neering.
Contact your' placement office for ap-
pointment and further details.
THE GLENN L. MARTIN CO.
BALTIMORE 3, MD.

SENIORS.

"9*

North American
Aviation
Los -Angeles
will interview here
MARCH 2

Actual interviewing of the 1000
boys, representing a highly accu-
rate cross section of all the 3,200,-
000 boys 14 to 16 in the nation,
will be done during April and May
The questions will concern such
things as how the boys spend their
time at work and play, what their
attitudes are towards society and
themselves, their problems and
preoccupations with girls and
what are their educational and vo-
cational needs.
"Probability sampling" will be
the method used to pick those
to be interviewed, for its guar-
antees an equal chance of being
chosen to all those in thebdes-
ignated age group.
Three hundred adults, including
camp counselors, teachers and

GRACE .BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone NO 2-1121
Wm. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M.: Sunday School-for all ages.
11:00 A.M.: "iscerning God's Will."
6:00 P.M.: Student Guild.
6:30 P.M.: Youth Groups.
7:30 P.M.: "Real Christian Growth."
Wed. 7:30: Prayer Meeting.
Come and hear the Word of God. A warm welcome
awaits you here.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
(Formerly at Y.M.C.A.)
Sundays: 10:15, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays: 7:30 P.M., Bible Study.
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ-ABC Net-
work Sundays: 1:00-1:30 P.M.

*~*~r* ~*~*Y~*

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FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
William and State Sts.
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
10:45 A.M.: Dr. Parr will speak on "The Impris-
oned Splendor."
6:00 P.M.: Student Guild in Pilgrim Room. Miss
Jean Walker, National Student Work Asso-
ciate, will speak on "The Vocation of Chris-
tian Studentship."

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athletic coaches will also be in-
terviewed to find out what they
think of boys' interests, activities
and problems.
Stephen B. Whithey, assistant
program director of the center's
Public Affairs Program, and Mrs.
Elizabeth M. Douvan, study direc-
tor at the Center, will head the
survey.
It.

THE ANN ARBOR BANK
offers you a plai to
BANK BY MAIL
Be sure to iuquire about this plan:
SAVE TIME and MONEY
Tit 11V A T IT A t1)D DA1XTf

I

ALL-CAMPUS
SNACK
Delivery Service
Delivery on the hour
9-10-11 every evening.
Minimum order of $1.00
nr ra irinr~

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
AND STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenbw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Charles Mitchell, Assistant Minister
William S. Baker, Student Pastor
Donna B. Lokker, Program Assistant
9:15 A.M.: Breakfast Seminar on "The Last
Judgemnent."
9:15 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Charles
Mitchell preaching on "A Shift of Allegiance."
11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. William
Baker preaching on "So Great Salvation."
5:30 P.M.: Westminster Guild Supper.
6:45 P.M.: Report and discussion of the Pres-
byterian conference on Ecumenical Church-

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
William H. Bos, Minister to Students
Irene Applin Boice, Director -of Music
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service, sermon by Reverend
Press, "Christian Love."
6:00 P.M.: Student Guild at Congregational
Church. Speaker: Miss Jean Walker.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Feb. 28-Christ Jesus.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00. P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South

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