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February 26, 1954 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-02-26

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THE MICHIGAN DAIL'Y

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1954

OCUMENTARIES:

Mrs. Flaherty Describes Film-Making
By HARRY STRAUSS
Truth of the subject is the most
important consideration in making
a film in the opinion of Francis :.h,
Hubbard Flaherty, and this -is ,,.-: :"
what het late husband, Robert
Flaherty used in all his films. .,,"
On campus to appear on a TV:
program and to visit the Flaherty{
Film Festival, Mrs. Flaherty said
that the documentary films made
by her husband and modern "stu-
dio" films are very wide apart and
cannot be compared.f
* * *
"MY IUSBAND made his films
as the artist does, doing all the
work himself. His films are pic-
tures of the pattern of life of peo-r
ple. To make them, he lived with ES :
them and identified himself with

"People were never asked to do
anything," she continued, "that
was not natural to them. Noth-
ing in their lives was really
changed, though some things
were re-enacted."
Mrs. Flaherty, who accompanied
her husband on most of the film-
making trips, noted that a script
was never on hand. "Nothing was
preconceived. Things worked them-
selves out as he worked his way
into the subject and worked the
subject on the screen," she added.
THE ART as portrayed in her
husband's films was visual art,
"silent and otherwise," for even
after the coming of sound, it was
used as just another dimensioh
that was not too necessary in por-
traying life, Mrs. Flaherty said.
The Flaherty Foundation, she
remarked, was set up a year ago
to help the young artist work for
the freedom that is needed in the
film medium, and "we hope that
the. artist presents his work in
the Flaherty tradition."
ALL-CAMPUS
SNACK
Delivery Servie
Delivery on the hour
9-10-11 every evening.'
Minimum order of $1.00
per residence.
Hamburgers, Sandwiches
Home-baked Pies and
Cookies
SNACK SERVICE
Phone NO 8-6076

-Daily-Lon Qui
MRS. FRANCIS FLAHERTY VIEWS SOME FLAHERTY PRINTS
ON DISPLAY AT THE ALUMNI MEMORIAL HALL
'Everlasting' Bar of Soap
Cleans Decade of Professors

By ARLENE LISS
"I remember that soap with ex-
treme affection," Prof. Anthony
M. Pasquariello of the romance
languages department mused.
The piece of plain white soap
he was alluding to seemed ordi-
nary enough, but according to
Prof. Pasquariello it is "part of
the building, an institution."
IT COULD have been there for
many years previously but it was
in 1944 that Prof. Pasquariello and
Opera Singer
To Perform .
George London, Metropolitan
Opera bass-baritone, will give the
eighth concert of the Choral Un-
ion Series at 8:30 p.m. Sunday in
Hill Auditorium.
On his program will be selec-
tions ranging from Verdi's "Credo
from Othello" and Brahms' "Von
ewiger Liebe" through John Niles'
"Gambler's Song of the Big Sandy
River."
Tickets priced at $1.50, $2.50 and
$3 may be purchased daily at the
University Musical Society office
in Burton Tower.

his five office-mates came to
tice the soap.

no-I

Stand Made
In Teacher
Controversy
By FREDDI LOEWENBERG
Taking a stand on the state
teacher certification controversy,
the University Joint Committee on
the Education of Teachers has
recommended "that the existing
minima of professional education
for the elementary, secondary and
junior college certificates be main-
tained."
The controversy centers around
proposed revision of the state cer-
tification code to increase the
number of hours of professional
education courses required and set
general education requirements,
putting a maximum on the num-
ber of hours which a student may
have in his field of specialization.
* * *
THE COMMITTEE'S recommen-
dations have been adopted by fac-
ulties of both the literary and edu-
cation schools.
This report would increase the
junior college minimum to 20
and the second'ary-elementary to
30 hours, including at least 10
hours of laboratory experience.
Much concern has been expressed
by state educators that this in-
crease in education courses
would be at the expense of the
student's particular field or con-
- centration.
Agreeing with present policy,
University joint committee mem-
bers felt that any revision should
establish only minimum require-
ments on the length and distribu-
tion of work, and leave it to the
schools to set their own limits.
In addition to the profession-
al education courses, the state
sub-committee would set up a 40
hour general education require-
ment in courses such as humani-
ties, social and natural sciences
and family living. This would be
filled at any time during a stu-
dent's four years.
In its report, the University com-
mittee asks that any requirements
be stated in general terms to "give
institutional autonomy for work-
ing out the most effective pro-
grams."
Eliot Notes
Planning Need
The need for a widespread will-
ingness to use a planning process
and national resources as instru-
ments for increasing the strength
of the nation, was emphasized by
Charles W. Eliot, former executive
director of Natural Resources
Planning Board, in his lecture,
"Planning for the American Heart-
land," yesterday.
Eliot listed five types of national
resources which "are the basis of
all power and raw materials, the
source of all strength of our na-
tion." How we use our resources is
a problem of planning," Eliot con-
tinued. "We are not going to be
ruled by the resources, but should
organize them for our purposes."
Eliot also cited the steps in the
planning process and named or-
ganization as one of its chief prob-
lems.

'Ensian
All 'Ensian salesmen are re-
quested to return their sales-
books to the Student Publica-
tions Building as soon as pos-
sible.
PLATFORM:
Democrats
reveal Plan
Members of the Ann Arbor
Democratic party last night for-
mally outlined their platform for
the 1954 city election campaign.
Sixteen sections formed the,
framework of what Democrats
term Ann Arbor's "needs and re-
sources."
. * * *
IN THE PREAMBLE to their
platform, party members charged
that local Republicans "have long
been guilty of government by post-
ponement."
Main points to be stressed by
Democrats in the one month
campaign before voters go to the
polls in April include the civil
service and fair play sections
civic improvement plans and un-
employment problems to be dealt
with.
In their platform under civic
improvements, the Democrats are
charging the "too often discrim-
ination is made against minority
groups." The Democrats "insist on
a fair-practices code on a non-dis-
criminatory merit-basis."
* * *
"A REPRESENTATIVE coordi-
nating board with authority to
present proposals for capital im-
provements" should be created ac-
cording to Democratic planners.
Special emphasis has been given
in the platform to unemployment
in Washtenaw county. "The Board
of Supervisors should be given a
mandate to do its share in com-
bining reduction of unemployment
with known requirements for
roads and otherpublic works in
the county" according to the out-
line revealed by Democrats yes-
terday.

Law Expert
Views Cases
Explaining what cases a respect-
able lawyer may accept, Judge
George Edwards of the juvenile
division of the Wayne County
Probate Court emphasized yes-
terday, "There is no question that
persons accused of being Com-
munists under the Smith Act have
the right to legal defense.
Our whole system of justice is
based on the right of all persons
to legal counsel," he added.
Addressing the Student Bar As-
sociation on "Ethical Boundaries
in Criminal Law Practice" Judge
Edwards presented practicalities
of criminal lawyers in the field
of ethics and integrity.
Judge Edwards advised that the
best method of establishing a law
practice was by knowing people
and serving them in the commun-
ity. "Never turn down any case
because it is below your stan-
dards," he stated.
"Accepting business by referral
from policemen, bondmen, bailiffs
or deputy-sheriffs will not only
injure one's reputation, but also
may bring disbarment," he warned.
Commenting on the role of the
court, Judge Edwards stated, "A
judge's chief problem is sentencing
a man. He is more interested in
saving the man than punishing
him. In this respect, he added,
law is becoming more like a social
science.

the end of the first semester five-
week period averages of those who
did not rush, those who rushed and
pledged and women who rushed
and did not pledge all stood at 2.2.
* * *
EARLY LAST semester both
Panhel and Assembly agreed to
work jointly on an evaluation of
fall rushing since some decision
would have to be reached by the
time trial period expired this
spring.
Panhel went ahead with its
survey and submitted two ques-
tionnaires, one to the financial
advisors of. the sororities to de-
termine the effects of fall rush-
ing on house finances and one
to those dormitory resident di-
rectors who had seen both sys-
tems in operation on this cam-
pus.
Before passing out their ques-
tionnaire Panhel was required to
submit it to Gertrude Mulhollan,
assistant dean of women and a
specialist in statistical sociology
who made. a number of revisions
designed to make the survey as
objective as possible.
* * *
IN THEIR report resulting from
the questionnaires, the following
statistical observation was made.
In the last two years of the

It was at this time that the
building which had been con-
demned as a museum was turn-
ed over to the romance langu-
ages department.
At that time the soap was larg-
er than it is now "but not very
much larger." It was used regu-
larly by the six inhabitants and
they first began to wonder when
it showed no signs of decreasing
in size.
INTRIGUED BY the soap, Prof.
Pasquariello searched the stores
to ty and find the brand but he
never located it.
"They don't make soap like
that nowadays, they couldn't or
they would go out of business,"
he said with regret.
Estimated to be in its tenth
year of constant use the soap is
still being used "three or four'
times a day."
The apparently everlasting soap
seems to be as much a part of the
tradition of the Romance Langu-
ages Bldg. as the bats that occa-
sionally fly down from the tower.
Architect To Talk
Steen E. Rasmussen, Danish
architect and town planner, will
speak on "The Copenhagen Metro-
politan Regional Plan" at 4:15
p.m. today in the' Architecture
auditorium.
The lecture is open to th epublic.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

CG Movies
Cary Grant and Josephine
Hull will play in "Arsenic and
Old Lace" in the Student Leg-
islature Cinema Guild film pro-
gram at 7 and 9 p.m. today in
Architecture Auditorium.
Starring Frederic March and
Florence Eldridge, "Christoph-
er Columbus" will be the fea-
tured movie at 7 and 9 p.m.
tomorrow and 8 p.m. Sunday.
Price of admission is 50 cents.

former spring rushing system 43
quota places in sororities were
unfilled in 1951 and 55 in 1952.
For the two fall rushing seasons
14 quota units were unfilled in
1952 and 15 in 1953.
Panhel President Martha Hill,
'54, pointed out that under the
old system the quota vacancies
were sustained by two or three
houses whereas under the fall
rushing plan the vacancies were
spread over more houses.
One sorority, Delta Zeta, which
regularly had a very sizable num-
ber of unfilled quota places, drop-
ped off campus in the fall of '52.
THE ASSEMBLY report to Pan-
hel based on a survey of inde-
pendent women who had exper-
ienced both fall and spring rush-
ing summarized independent opin-
ion as "opposed to fall rushing."
The report on the effect of fall
rushing on five points--the "big
sister' program, leadership train-
ing, the dorm athletic program,
Lantern Night and other dormi-
tory functions.
Assembly pointed out in their
report that this questionnaire was
considered inadequate by many in-
dependent women because it failed
to ask an evaluation of the two
systems and their effect on the
individual woman rushee.

,4

Local Panhellenic Discusses
Fall, Spring RushingIssue
(Continued from Page 1)

II

I

Radio Jobs Open
The Radio Guild of WUOM has
openings for men interested in
radio acting.

FARMER'S PRODUCE
MARKET
Sales from Farmer Directly to Consumer
Open every WED. and SAT. - 8 A.M. to 3 P.M.
DETROIT STREET -- between Catherine and Kingsley
More and more men are reaiing
that a "stuffed" feeling in their
suits is a lot of unnecessary non-
sense. And they're switching to
our Wilton Model , . . with its
minimum of padding, maximum
of comfort and quiet good taste,
" N B ! ile

I

YC
RIC
Open 10 A.M.-10 P.M.
Sunday 12 noon-7 P.M.
PHONE NO 3-7191
9 BEER * WINE

DU CAN DRIVE
GHT TH ROUGH!
No parking worries.
We have ICE CUBES.

:4 14: 1 i'l

All

114 E. Williams
o SOFT DRINKS

U

.,a44't mi, e ' WA "/74 Ia~

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39.50

44.50

" Sport Coats

24.50

An Opportunity for ENGINEERS
in the Expanding Instruments
and Automatic Control Field
Mechanical engineers, here's an opportunity to
become a part of a vital industry with a real future. INTERVIEWS
Republic Flow Meters Company, Chicago, manufac- Mar. 5
turer of, industriai automatic controls, will have a
representative on campus soon to interview senior Make appoint-
engineers for positions in research, design, produc- ment through
tion and sales engineering. Florence T. Post
Republic is progressive, medium sized. All execu- Office of the
tives are engineers. Promotion within company a
policy. Liberal hospital, life and retirement insur- Dean
ance plans. Profit sharing.
AUTOMATIC CONTROL IS A FIELD WITH A FUTURE
PURCHASE FROM "PURCHASE"
En&9y ) e...0Eyk ow/!

Students
HAMBURGERS
SPAGHETTI
SANDWICHES
Seafood - TV
BEER -- WINE
7ie9IeP 4.
120 WEST LIBERTY

When you know your beer
...1TSOUND tO BBUD

The same clothing as sold in Detroit,
Cleveland, Chicago, etc.
ANN ARBOR CLOTHING

11

People who go places and do things prefer
Bud. And there's a very good
reason for Budweiser's superiority...
it is brewed and aged by the costliest
process known to give Bud the
distinctive taste that has pleased
more people than
any other beer in history.

113 South Main

NO 2-5187

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Kicked in the Face

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Once there was a Sopho
had a Sister. He also had
Coincidence would have it
males labored under the
Handicap of Ermintrude. Si
The sister (call her Ermini
the record) goo married. In
ess, she produced an Offs
fraternal-like, Our Boy sat
wrote her a Letter of C

bya Bootee
OR...Who Ever Called
it a "Blessed Event"?
more who stamp and dropped the Missive in
a Girl. As the Mails.
t, both fe Our Sophomore still hasa sister
Baptismal named Ermintrude. No Girl. And he
mall world, still has No Idea why.
trude I for Had he but had a Telegrammar, he'd
due proc- have Known Enough to send Sis and
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