100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 09, 1954 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-02-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AGE ETGT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1954

Le~ ,~uwr THE MCHIGAX DAILY TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1954

Collectositem

Mademoiselie magazine is the first to publish
Dylan Thomas'
great play for voices,
-Wd
i der Milk Wood
This extraordinary contribution to English literature
is illustrated with exclusive pictures of
Dylan Thomas at home in the village that inspired
the play. Mr. Thomas has been called the modern Keats.

Stan Kenton To
Concert Will Feature
Garner Trio, Gillespie

Prese nt

Modern

Jazz

Festival

MERIT AWARDS:
Women May Still Petition
For Tri-Delt Scholarship

-

In February

V...on newsstands January 29

U

yw10r"u CARDS,

' eie4

for

4~iee

1g l I ~k'l

VALLN' I IItbE

I

wDAY'
February 14'

Stan Kenton and his orchestra
will present a "Festival of Modern
American Jazz," including acts by
five other top entertairers, at 7:15
p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Friday at Hill
Auditorium.
Tickets for the festival are
priced at $2, $1.50, and $1. They
may be purchased from 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. today through Friday at
the Hill Auditorium box office. All
seats are reserved.
STAN KENTON'S o r c h e s t r a,
which will be the main feature of
the festival, will act as host for
the other performers.
The Erroll Garner trio, "Diz-
zy" Gillespie, Charlie Parker,
and Candido will be featured
along with vocalist June Christy
and the 20-piece Kenton orches-
tra.
Erroll Garner, who hails from
Pittsburgh, has done numerous re-
cordings in recent years. He comes
from a musical family, since his
father played piano and saxa-
phone, and six out of seven of his
brothers and sisters also had key-
board talent.
* * *
GARNER started playing when
he was about three, and since he
has a good ear, never has learned
to read music. "I tried and I
couldn't make it, so I just didn't
ever learn," he said.
He played with a group called
"The Candy Kids," aid when he
was 14 or 15 he began to play
professionally around I o c a 1
I clubs.
Garner is strictly a melody man.
Though he plays a lot of chords,
they're still the chords of the tune,
and the melody can be found
somewhere among them.
* * *
HE HAS NO eyes for enlarging

ambition is to play in concerts. In
keeping with his impressionist
ballad style, two of Garner's re-
cent record releases have been Ra-
vel'9 "Pavanne pour une Infante
defunte," and Debussy's "Reverie."
As with all leaders who estab-
lish a new style, "Dizzy" Gilles-
pie has gone through .a tremen-
dous transitional period. "Dizzy"
is the first to admit that when
his band was young, he played a
style of music called "bop," that
was somewhat hard to dance to,
according to his followers.
Today, the new "Dizzy" Gilles-
pie has a sextette that retains the
excitement of the music but has
added the necessary dance beat.
* * *
"DIZZY" started playing with
a 10-piece band of youngsters.
Through broadcasts, Roy Eldridge
became his first idol. Like so many
other musicians, he came out with
a style completely differant and
"all his own."
He made his first records in
March, 1927 with Teddy Hill. A
little clique of musicians then
started the "Dizzy cult." He
played at the World's Fair and
then spent four months with
Edgar Hayes, followed by an-
other stint with Hill and Cab
Calloway at the Cotton Club in
1939.
From 1941 to 1943 "Dizzy" had
a variety of jobs - with Calvin
Jackson, with his own band in
Philadelphia, with Earl Hines for
10 months, for Coloman Hawk-
ins, with Duke Ellington subbing
for a few weeks at the Capitol
Theatre on Broadway.
From there "Dizzy" graduated
into leading his band.
Dean, Presidents

Student Volunteer Workers
Assist Staff at 'U' Hospital

ERROLL GARNER

"DIZZY" GILLESPIE

SEE OUR HUGE SELECTION

Petitioning for the 1954 Delta
Delta Delta general scholarship
opened Jan. 5 and will continue
through Saturday, Feb. 20.
The scholarship is available to
all women students on campuses
where there are Tri-Delt chapters.
They may, or may not, be sorority
members, but they should be well-
qualified students, showing prom-
ise of being valuable citizens in
their future communities,
AWARDS ARE made annually,
usually in the spring, with the co-
operation of the deans of women.
The amount of the award on any
one of the 96 campuses included
in the competition may not exceed
$200.
Made up from contributions
from alliance and collegiate
chapters, clubs, and individual
members, gifts to the general
scholarship fund are matched
by national Delta Delta Delta
dollar for dollar.
Iota, the local chapter of Delta
Delta Delta, obtains the majority
of its funds through the annual
benefit bridge, put on for the al-

BOYCE PHOTO CO.

liance, alumnae, and friends 'and
the traditional spring musicale, a
campus-wide event.
LAST YEAR, Donnie Brock-
meyer, '54, Delta Delta Delta, and
Barbara Petrie, '54, of Ann Arbor,
received $125 collegiate awards
for outstanding scholarship and
activities on campus.
The Delta Delta Delta Com-
mittee on Awards will again be
the sole judge of the respective
merits of the applicants, with
suggestions and approvals from
the deans of women and the lo-
cal chapter.
Headed by Mrs. Charles C. Per-
rin, national scholarship advisor
and service projects chairman;the
committee is not obligated to fol-
low through and grant an award if
no one is worthy of the honor.
Successful candidates will be
notified by May 1, 1954, and the
scholarships will be awarded to
them at the beginning of the term
for which the awards are granted.
Application blanks are available
at the Office of the Dean of Wom-
en, 1514 Administration Building.

I.

723 North University

''/

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS BRING FAST RESULTS
gg'no m Y w wvx m m . "-:n-, . rr . r',Y: E! r ... . . A

his group beyond trio size, and his Discuss Addition

#V,1 :X
$ .y~

I

6cn'44 Campn/us

I

LEAGUE COUNCIL-There will
be a meeting of the League Coun-
cil at 4 p.m. tomorrow in the
League.
WAA-All house athletic man-
agers are requested by Carol Gid-
dings to attend a meeting at 5
p.m. tomorrow at the WAB.
KENTON CONCERT-Campus
groups who have purchased blocks
of tickets for the Stan Kenton
"Festival of Modern American
Jazz" are requested to pick up
their tickets from 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. before Friday at Hill Auditor-
ium.
* . *
HILLEL-A reception for new
students will be given at 4 p.m.1
Thursday at the Hillel Building.
The students will have a chance to
learn more about the Hillel organ-
ization at this time.

To Couzens Hall
Presidents of the women's dor-
mitories on campus recently met
with Dean Elsie Fuller to discuss
arrangements for the new addi-
tion to Couzens Hall which will be
built in a year or two.
This addition will do a great]
deal to alleviate the housing prob-
lem and will house students from
various schools.
Since the women consulted live
in dormitories, it was felt that
they would have many suggestions
for the planning of the new build-
ing.
In future meetings the group
will be asked for suggestions
about the size, arrangement and
placement of rooms. They will also
start planning the government and
constitution of the addition.
Central committee members who
will work with Dean Fuller on this
project are Marilyn Gordon, Mu-
riel Claflin, Vonda Genda, Carol
Alford, Donna Westerlund and
Terry Burke.

By ELAINE EDMONDS
Increasingly familialfto the pa-
tiepts in University Hospital are
the bright red smocks of the vol-
unteer workers.
These volunteers are townspeo-
ple and students, both men and
women, who have offered their as-
sistance in performing all sorts of
jobs in the hospital. These are non-
professional duties which save the
time of the professional staff for
actual nursing care.
IN THEIR Hospital Volunteer
Services Program the Community
Service Committee of the League
offers women students an oppor-
tunity to assist in this worthwhile
service,
There are opportunities for
volunteer workers in most of the
departments of the hospital and
the Out-patient Clinic. These
positions require no previous ex-
perience.
Jobs are available writing let-
ters, shopping, reading to patients,
advising patients of religious serv-
ices, helping the chaplains, assist-
ing with the Sunday chapel serv-
ices, wheeling children to and from
school, assisting teachers, taking
the library cart to patients' bed-
sides, and helping them select
books and reading material.
THOSE STUDENTS who are in-
terested in entertainment will
have an opportunity to display
their talents by planning and put-
ting on programs for the wards.
Hostesses are needed to greet
and help patients and visitors
at the door, guide ihem through
the hospital, and entertain chil-
dren in the waiting room.
The' advantages of this type of
volunteer service are many and
varied. These include practical ex-
perience in. various fields, the op-
portunity to meet people, and the
chance to render service to the
hospital staff and benefits to the
patients. It also affords fun and
personal enjoyment to those who
offer their services.
THE VOLUNTEER service at
the hospital is under the direction
of Mrs. Andrea W. Keyes.
Any student who is interested in
volunteering may seehMrs. Keyes
by appointment in her office at

FUN WITH A FUTURE

t

F MM

the hospital, Rm. 1212, by calling
her at NO 3-1531, Ext. 289.
The League Community Service
Committee asks that all women
fill out the community -services
questionnaires which are and have
been available in all housing units,
so that a record of all interested
women can be kept at the League.

0 No previous training necessary. Students in
any field of study who are scholastically
eligible, are invited to join.

# Receive valuable business training so im-
portant in post-college days. Unlimited op-
portunities in the fields of advertising, selling,
public relations, finance, and management.
* Participate in one of the most worthwhile
of campus activities! Make new friends!

/

1I

:'3.

JOIN

BU SI NE S S TAF F,

costume

DO YOU'HAVE A
Q yes QI no - either way, you will
enjoy browsing at
115 W. Liberty St.
ust West of Main St.
MODELS OF ALL KINDS PLEXIGLAS
CRAFT MATERIALS CRAFT TOOLS

TUESDAY, Feb. 9, 4:15 P.M.
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 10, 4:15 P.M.

fashion stamp
of elegance

FRUIT - FLAVORED LIPSTICK.
MILKMAID'S fresh, bright exciting
colors. PYXIE PINK (the teen-
agers own true love), CHERRY
PINK (lively rosy pink), RED
CURRANT (never changes color
under changing lights). Contain-
ing 15% sweet cream for satin-
smoothness. Exclusive at The
Fischer Pharmacy - Liberty at
Fifth Ave.
obt f}T
MARC
DIMESt

420 MAYNARD STREET
Student Publications Bldg.

I

i

i

11
V=

Duches

S

Royal

Slip and Petticoat
of no iron

eloquent suits that
keep their price tag

'"JKo'h9/eatn

II

a secret

Perfectly co-ordinated two and three-piece
styles. "Roylaine" acetate and rayon suit,
print-lined to match its blouse . . . smart,
slim dress with its own jacket, to wear with,
or independently. Misses sizes. See them in
our window at the College Shop ... try them
on in our suit department-Second Floor.
' .00

The sip, designed with
shadowproof panels both front
and back and exquisitely fine
nylon trim. Proportioned short,
average, 32-40. Tall lengths in
sizes 34-44, $3.95
The 'etticoat, proportioned
for perfection of fit . . .
withshadowproof panels
front and back, and twin tiers of
exquisite nylon embroidered trim.
In proportioned short, average,
and tall lengths in sizes small,
medium and large. $3.95

"6
SRI
WHO
{
,y s

i-x

I

11

A 44% +...

C A W Al C !!

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan