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September 27, 1953 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-09-27

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PACL PTWO

THE NTCIIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1953

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GR REPULCN BANDo 4PARIS
FRANCOIS-JULIEN~ BRUN, Conductor

Three concerts in Rackham
Auditorium by the Griller Quar-
tet and Reginald Kell Players will
constitute the fourteenth annual
Chamber Music Festival, occur-
ring from Feb. 19 to 21.
Beginning on Friday, Feb. 19,
the Griller Quartet will open the
Festival with a program of Haydn,
Bloch and Mozart quartets. The
Sunday afternoon concert will in-
clude works of Bach, Mozart, Rub-
bra and Beethoven.
MEMBERS of. the quartet are
Sidney Griller, first violin, Jack
iO'Brien, second violin, Philip Bur-
ton, viola, and Colin Hampton,
violoncello.
The Griller String Quartet
has remained together without
change in personnel longer than
any other ensemble. Now in its
twenty-fourth year on the con-
cert stage, this accomplished
quartet remains the only group
to have survived such longevity
with no change in the members
of their group.
Upon their graduation from the
Royal Academy of Music in Lon-
don, the four refused to make
solo concert appearances, and de-
voted their time to making a suc-
cessful group. They have since
played to audiences throughout
the world, most recently becoming
the resident quartet for the Uni-
versity of California in Berkely.
The quartet, now recognized as
England's foremost chamber mu-
sic ensemble, recently completed
engagements throughout Europe
including an appearance at the
British Coronation, and is making
its eighth coast-to-coast American
tour.
THE QUARTET will also play
the closing concert of the Festival
on Sunday evening, February 21.
The Reginald Kell Players will
take the spotlight on Saturday
evening, February 20, when they
will perform two classic com-
positions by Beethoven and
Brahms, respectively, and two
modern chamber compositions
by Bartok and Milhaud.
Led by Reginald Kell, one of
the world's finest concert clarinet-
ists, the group is completed by
Joel Rosen,xpianist, Melvin Ritter,
violinist; and Aurora Natola, cell-
ist.
* * *
THE FAMED clarinetist is now
on his fourth American tour. A
Mozart expert, he made his New
York Town Hall debut in 1948 as
guest artist with the Busch Quar-
tet. He was immediately lauded,
by critics and audiences.-
Even before his appearance in
this country, U. S. audiences were,
familiar with his music, for his
recording of the Mozart Clarinet
Quintet with the London Philhar-
monic Quartet was voted the best,
chamber music record of the year.,
Tickets for the Chamber music
festival can be purchased begin-
ning Oct. 15 in Burton Memorial
Tower.
,AI

GREEK SOLOIST TO SING HERE
Star Contralto Elena Nikolaidi
To Appear in March Concert

Elena

Nikolaidi, well known

Appearing Monday, November 30
8:30 P.M.
(EXTRA CONCERT SERIES)
Pierre Piton
ad Andre Briche,
Lead Tr'i inpeers

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CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIV AL:
Kell Players, Griller Quartet To Play

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_I -- - - -- - -

ESSIA

SUNDAY,

c

RTS

Greek contralto who will appear
here on March 12 in the Choral '
Union Series, is starting her thirdv
season with the Metropolitan Op-
era Company.
Although widely admired
throughout Europe as a concert
artist and a leading member of
the Vienna Opera, she was un-
known in America until her debut
in New York's Town Hall in Jan-
uary 1949.
HIGHLY PRAISED by many
critics, Miss Nikolaidi was suc-3
cessfully launched on a concert
Choral Union
Has Enlargedx
In 74 Years a
Historically speaking. the Uni-
versity Choral Union could notc
have a more appropriate name.s
The 300 voices now comprisingr
one of the University's foremost
musical organizations may trace
their conception, to 1879, when
the members of four Ann Arbor
church choirs banded together toe
give small-scale presentations of
Handel's "Messiah."
* * ,*
THE "MESSIAH" has remainedY
a Choral Union tradition, with
two performances given in Hill
Auditorium each December, butf
the first programs shared top bill-c
ing with church social activities,
with Ladies' Aid Societies in
charge of the latter part of the
schedule.c
As these performances ex-1
panded beyond the capacitiesa
of local churches, the Union
saw growth both in member-r
ship and in repertoire. Perhaps1
the Choral Union's most re-
markable historical feature, ac-
cording to Charles Sink, presi-
dent of the University Musicalt
Society, is that its progress has
been continuous in spite of1
world wars (with corresponding
losses in male voices) and sev-
eral other obstacles.R
Choral Union membership to-;
day is limited to 300 singers be-
cause of Hill Auditorium's size.
Although University students com-
prise the major part of the choir,
several other competant voices
gained admission. The chorus is
reorganized every autumn, with
new singers invited to audition to
fill vacated places.
If their attendance records are
satisfactory, old members are au-
tomatically re-admitted upon ad-
vance application. Prospective
members should make appoint-
ments for auditions immediately
at the University Musical Socie-
ty's offices in Burton Tower.
a *
IN ADDITION to its annual per-
formances of "Messiah," conduct-
ed just before the Christmas sea-
son by Lester McCoy, the Choral
Union is acclaimed for its two
May Festival Concerts. These are
given in connection with the Phil-
adelphia Orchestra and other pro-
fessional soloists, and are direct-
ed by the Cincinnati Symphony's
conductor Thor Johnson.
Outstanding among other se-
lections from the Choral Union
repertoire are Bach's "Magnifi-
cat in D Major," Gounod's
"Faust," Mozart's "Requiem,"
Rachmaninoff's "The Bells,"
I Sibelius' "Onward Ye Peoples,"

career in this country. Her first
North American tour of '76 or-
chestral and recital engagements
was completely sold out as were
her succeeding tours.
The contralto has appeared
as soloist with several well
known symphony orchestras
and recorded Beethoven's Ninth
Symphony with the New York
Philharmonic Orchestra under
the direction of Bruno Walter,
in 1949.
Miss Nikolaidi's debut with the
Metropolitan Opera was made in
March, 1951 in two special per-
formances of the Verdi Requiem.
Praised particularly for her
roles of Klytemnestra in the
concert version of Richard Strauss'
"Elektra" and that of Anneris in
Verdi's "Aida," Miss Nikolaidi has
proved herself to be an excellent
actress as well as opera singer.
IN MAY, 1952, the artist tiew to
Australia for a long series of re
citals and orchestral appearances,
stopping to sing in Hawaii en-
route.
Miss Nikolaidi has also giv-
en several benefit concerts to aid
her native Greece.
Born in a small town near Ath-
ens, Miss Nikolaidi inherited her
musical gifts from her father, a
professor of Byzantine music.
At fifteen she received a six-
year scholarship to an Athens
conservatory of music. During her
final year at the conservatory the
young contralto made her pro-
fessional debut with the State Or-
chestra, pimitri Mitropoulos con-
ducting.
SOON AFTER her graduation
she was appearing at the Athens
Lyric Theatre in "Carmen," "Sam-
son and Dalila" and other operas.
A special act of Congress re-
cently conferred the right of per-
manent residence in the United
States upon the singer and her
family.
Miss Nikolaidi has made many
transcriptions for the Voice of
America for broadcasting to her
homeland. For this work the King
of Greece has awarded her the
Golden Phoenix Cross, one of
Greece's highest civilian honors
and a citation "for cementing close
cultural ties between the United
States and Greece and for out-
standing contributions in the
fields of music and arts."
Hill Remains
As Monument
To Aunnus
Hill Auditorium, home of the
University Musical Society con-
certs, was constructed in 1913,
from funds bequethed to the Uni-
versity by the late Arthur Hill of
Saginaw.
An alumnus of the University,
for many years a member of the
Board of Regents, and a zealous
art patron, he was one who was
greatly interested in the cultural
education of the general student
body of the University.
* * *
AT THAT TIME the Regents
supplemented Mr. Hill's bequest
by a sum sufficient to construct
the .uditorium on what was then
monumental lines. The architects
designed special quarters for the
br:e7e Memorial organ which had
been Dlfrchased by the University

I

SATURDAY,

DEC. 5, AT 8:30;

DEC. 6,

AT 2:30

,

CAROL SMITH

NORMAN SCOTT

LESTER McCOY

MAUD NOSLER

WALTER FREDERICKS

THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION

MAUD NOSLER, Soprano
CAROL SMITH, Contralto

NORMAN SCOTT, Bass
MUSICAL SOCIETY ORCHESTRA

1111.

I

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