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September 27, 1953 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-09-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE ETGTM

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER ?7, 1953

WHY FLIES?

Zoologist Explains Cold Weather Pests
>* * * *

By JANE HOWARD
Lifting a worn fly-swatter to
annihilate what she hoped would
be the last of the grossly extended
fly season, Sue Mitchell, '56, grim-
aced and asked, "Where do these
things come from-isn't it suppos-
ed to be fall?"
In answer to similar inquiries
by scores of people who have re-
cently been exasperated by the
tenacious presence of common
house flies in Ann Arbor, Prof.
Urless N. Lanham, an entomology
specialist of the Zoology depart-
ment, turned to common sense
and to his textbodks.
ALTHOUGH, as Miss Mitchell
and many others believe, flies are
obviously more common to sum-
mer months, Lanham explained
that the recent cool weather only
makes them more obnoxious to
people confined indoors. Diptera
(flies, to the layman) mascots
share with humans a marked de-
sire for warmth and shelter.-
.Under the vague impression
that flies, likeabirds, somehow
migrate to more pleasant cli-
mates during cold weather, a
misguided reporter was correct-
ed by Lanham's assurance that
many flies remain with us all
winter long, in whatever warm
places they can find.
" . The majority of house flies do
succumb to frigid temperatures.
A few hardy individuals, how-
ever, manage not only to survive
all Winter but to carry on sideline
reproducing processes in the bar-

Vet Students!
Better, Says
Robertson
From his experience with vet-
erans who have enrolled in the
college, James H. Robertson, as-
sistant dean of the College of Lit-
erature, and Arts, has concluded
that military service, more often
than not, helps men to become
better students.
Though he does not maintain
that military service always should
come before college, he has found
that the students who have had
service before beginning college
and who have had their educationj
interrupted seem to improve be-
cause of the experience.
DEAN ROBERTSON thinks that
students who have been in the
service are more mature, serious,
thoughtful and purposeful.
"Returning servicemen have a
clearer knowledge of what they
want from college and frequently
are better able to get what they
want," says Robertson.
The Dean reports that "many
students who have floundered
and have earned unsatisfactory
records before entering the ser-
vice have returned with a ma-
turity and clarity of purpose
which results in, substantially
improved college rewards." ....
The University has about* 500
Korean veterans this fall, an
amount double last year's enroll-
ment of such persons. About half
of the 500 are in the literary col-
lege.

endors
A typical Michigan football
game scene of large crowds,
spirited students, and a Michi-
gan victory was made complete
yesterday with the presence of
the familiar dime program ven-
dors.
Undaunted by warnings of
possible copyright violation, the
lefiant salesmen hawked their
rosters at brisk pace.
Club Sets Trip
For Minnesota
A mass meetinb is scheduled for
4:15 p.m. Tuesday at the Union
for all students who plan to go
on the Wolverine club specials to
the Minnesota, Illinois or State
games.
Reservations may be made from
1 p.m. to 4 p.m. daily at the Ad-
ministration Bldg. beginning Wed-
nesday.
HELLO HANK!
.. WHERE ARE
YOU GOING FOR
YOUR SNACK?
Meet me at .. .
George's Place
1104 S. University

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION:
Local Churches Observe Special Week

Local observance of. Christian
Education Week will be highlight-
ed this week by workshops for
church school teachers and a spec-
ial movie for school-age children.
Rev. A. Russell Stevenson of the
National Council of Churches will
be featured speaker at the work-
shops, which are scheduled Wed-
nesday at local Methodist and
Presbyterian Churches.
* * '
WORKSHOPS will be divided
into three classes for those teach-
ers who lead grade school, junior
and senior high school age groups.

"For Every Child," a color
movie, will be shown as part of
the religious weer observances
at 7:45, p.m. Sunday, Oct. 4, in
the First Presbyterian Church.
Christian Education Week plans
begin today when several churches
will sponsor church school rallies,
designed to interest new students
and renew attendance of older
members.
Most 'Ann Arbor churches will
participate in the week's activities.
Sermons and special student-led
services will commemorate the first

day of the week set aside in the
name of Christian Education.
In medieval days, September 29
(Tuesday), was set aside as Mich-
aelmas Day, honoring Archangel
Michael who, according to Christ-
ian tradition led the army of heav-
en against rebellious archangel
Lucifer.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

A

-Daily-Chuck Kelsey
TAKE THAT--Another unseasonal insect bites the dust.
4' * * '5 '. 4

NEW SHIPMENTS of
USED TEXTBOOKS
arriving daily!
NEW BOOKS IF YOU PREFER.
For that hard-to-find textbook
try

gain, paving the way for next
Spring's crop of the bothersome
pests.
THE DIPTERA somehow chosen
for survival in cold weather are
divided among those which re-
main active inside houses and
those which hibernate outside. In-
fant flies may spend from eight
hours to three months in their
egg stage, Lanham explained.
Those who do survive must
exist on rather limited food
sources, since their sweet teeth
confine them primarily to a diet
of decaying sugar, which is later

dissolved in the flies' own saliva.
Frequently such nourishment is
difficult to find.
"Nearby dairy barns," Lanham
suggested, "with their wealth of
animal materials, may help to ex-
plain the current flurry of flies.'"
Students who count themselves
among the legion enemies of the
persistent and annoying insects'
may take comfort in Lanham's
own prediction: "as soon as it
gets really cold, I think their'
number will diminish sharply."
In the meantime, fly-swatters'
will remain an essential item in
household appliance cupboards,

2 FO
322 South State

LET

F5

MICHIGAN BOOKSTORE

BOB GRAHAM, Mgr.

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