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September 27, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-09-27

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PAGE STX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1953

- i

Southern Cal.
Minnesota .

17,
7 |

Missouri
Purdue

. 14 |1Illinois

* . . 21 Wisconsin.
. . 21 Penn State

. . 20 Northwestern 35
.0 lowaState . 0

Stanford
Oregon.

. . . 7 Georgia .
. . . 0 Tulane

. . 16 Georgia Tech.
. . 14 Florida. .* .

0*

Nebrask

. . .

0

Reserves Look Strong.
In First Grid Triumph

Gugliolmi Sparks Notre Dame Attack
As Irish Rally to Sink Sooners, 28-21

(Continued from Page 1)
rambled 14 yards late in the
period to cap a four-play, 63-
yard effort which featured some
excellent broken field running
by sophomore tailback Tom
Hendricks.
Dave Hill, carrying the ball for
the first time since his return
from Korea, scored the varsity's
last touchdown mid-way through
the fourth period. He took a lat-
eral from Dan Cline and bulled
14 yards, carrying two Husky de-
fenders the last five across the
goal.
HILL, WHO AS A highly-touted
sophomore had failed to come up
to expectations three years ago,
now seems to be one of the bright-
est of the new stars, and should
be much in evidence this season
and in 1954..-
Throughout the long after-
noon as the scoreboard reflected
the varsity's point-getting prow-
ess, observers increased conjec-
ture as to whether it was Mich-
igan's greatness or Washington's
weakness that was responsible
for the unbelievable final out-
come.
Athletic Director Fritz Crisler
summed it all up in perhaps the
best fashion when he commented
that Michigan wasn't as good as
the score, nor the Huskies as poor.
It seemed generally agreed all
around however that the Wolver-
ines, are a very strong team and
have been under-rated in the pre-
season forecasts.
BEFORE the game Michigan
was untried at the vital quarter-
back position. By the middle of
the second period, however, it was
pleasantly obvious that sopho-
more Lou Baldacci was more than
capable of filling the bill both as
a blocker and as a play-caller. The
200-pounder from Akron reacted
with the poise of a veteran in his
first appearance on a college grid-
iron. His linebacking was good,
but throughout the .afternoon
Michigan's linebackers were not

really tested because the Huskies
lacked possession of the ball for
great periods of time.
The alertness of the Michigan
squad was directly responsible
for most of the damage inflicted
upon the visitors. Passes were
intercepted, fumbles recovered,
a kick blocked; in short, it
seemed that Washington could
Eight to Go
MICHIGAN
LE Topp, Stanford, Williams
LT Strozewski,. Walker, Kolesar
LG Dugger, Fox, Marion, Dutter
C O'shaughnessy, Morrow, Peck-
ham
RG Beison, Cachey, Shomsky
RT Balog, Geyer, Bennett, Meads
RE Knutson, Veselenak, Schlicht
QB! Baldacci, Kenaga, McKinley,
McDonald
LH Kress, Cline, Hendricks
RH Branoff, Hickey, Corey
FB Balzhiser, Hurley, E. Johnson,
Hill
WASHINGTON
LE Black Houston
LT Wardlow, Esser
LG Noe, Monlux, Cassity
C Lindskog, Jack Lindskog
RG Bahart, R. smith
RT Parsons, Kucinskas, Chambers
RE Warsinske, McClary
QB Lederman, Roake
LH McNamee, Bergh, Dunn, Hoss-
feld
R Crook, Bridges, Kyllingstad
FB Nu gent, Sprague,. Sage'
MICHIGAN 13 18 13 6-50
WASHINGTON 0 0 0 0- 0
TOUCHDOWNS
Michigan - Branoff (2), Baldacci,
Kress (2), Hurley, Hickey, Hill.
CONVERSIONS
Michigan-Branoff, McDonald
TIME OF GAME: 2 hours, 31 minutes
OFFICIAL ATTENDANCE: 51,233

STATISTICS
Mich.
First Downs.......... 20
By rushing......... 12
By passing.......... 7
By penalty ....1
Rushing Yardage ....337
Number of rushes . 53
Passing Yardage ......134
Passes Attempted .. 21
Passes Completed.....10
Passes Intercepted ... 2
Punts.. ........5
Punting Average ...27.6
Fumbles Lost......... 0
Yards Penalized....... 65

Wash.
5
3
2
0
172
34
61
19
5
3
7
36
3
60

do nothing right and Michigan
made 50 points taking advantage
of that fact.
The 'running of Michigan's
corps of ball carriers was out-
standing. Moving behind the pre-
cision blocking of the line, Bran-
off, Kress, Balzhiser, Hurley, Hick-
ey and Hendricks galloped for
huge gains, to the delight of the
crowd.
THE FULLBACKS, Balzhiser,
Hurley and Hill, romped through
the Husky middle for big yardage
all afternoon. Several times the
Washington linemen were com-
pletely fooled by Balzhiser's spin-
ning. The Wheaton, Illinois sen-
ior also turned in a fine bit of
defensive play while backing up
the line.
Hurley, fully recovered from
the back injury which sidelined
him last season, flashed his
great speed on several long.runs
through the hapless Huskies.
All things considered, the var-
sity showed a powerful first team
and surprisingly good reserve
strength, two factors which should
cause no little uneasiness in East
Lansing and Columbus, not to
mention New Orleans.
British Golfers
Level Sig;hts
On Ryder Cup
WENTWORTH, England-P)-
A determined bunch of British
golfers will try to break the Unit-
ed States stranglehold on the Ry-
der Cup, symbol of world golfing
supremacy, in matches over the
tough Wentworth course Oct. 2-3.
The British look on Wentworth
as their lucky course. It was there,
back in 1926, that they gained a
runaway 13-1 victory withone
match halved in the first inter-
national clash between the two
countries.
* *
BUT THEY'LL need more than
luck to regain the Ryder Cup.-The
Wentworth course is a tough one
to play-so tough that it is known
over here as the "Burma Road."
It is 6,723 yards long with a
par of 72. The narrow fairways
are lined with trees, scrub and
undergrowth and demand pow-
erful, accurate drives and ap-
proach shots.
The Americans are hot favorites,
to add another victory to their
long string of successes. They
have won seven of the nine Ryder
Cup matches. Britain's 1926 vic-
tory was just an international
clash-one year before the start
of Ryder Cup play.
BOTH BRITISH victories were
chalked up in matches on this side1
of the Atlantic. Henry Cotton,
non-playing captain and three
times British open winner, has
put his men through a gruelling,
four-day test on the Wentworth
course to prepare them for the
challenge.
The United States team, 'even
without the redoubtable Ben Ho-
gan, is a powerful one.
Captain Lloyd Mangrum will be
able to choose his men for the
four foursomes and eight singles1
matches from Sam Snead, Ted
Kroll, Dave Douglas, Porky Oliver,
Cary Middlecoff, Fred Haas, Wal-
ter Burkemo, Jim Turnesa and
Jack Burke.
-LOWEST

WOLVERINE HALFBACK Tom Hendricks spins free in third
quarter of yesterday's game to lug pigskin from Washington 35
to 13 yard line and set up touchdown which Michigan punched
over on next play.
A JOB WELL DONE:
Oosterbaan Pleased by Win,
But Looks to Future Contests

tl

By IVAN N. KAYE
Daily Sports Editor
A tired, but happy Coach Bennie
Oosterbaan sat in a deserted cor-
ner of the Michigan dressing room
after the game yesterday chatting
with reporters about the perform-
ance of his team against the Wash-
ington Huskies.
He was pleased to discover that
his worries about finding a quar-
terback were virtually over, in
view of Lou Baldacci's poised
handling of the team in the cru-
cial early part of the game.
* * *
THE MICHIGAN coach could
not pick out any individuals in his
star-studded lineup of yesterday
for special recognition. It was ap-
parent that in a 50-0 ball game,
just about everyone was effective.
When Dave Hill's touchdown
run was mentioned, Bennie
flashed his famous grin, and the
newsmen did not have to be told
that the coach was pleased at the
fine showing of the Korea veter-
an from nearby Ypsilanti.
We were looking for a note of
exhileration, from the man whose
team had just finished drubbing a
major intersectional rival by 50
points, but Bennie just said in a
quiet voice, "I can't get too excit-
ed about this one, there are eight
more on the schedule.'
* * *
ACROSS THE narrow gravel
runway, there was deep silence in
the Washington dressing room.
John. Cherberg, the personable
coach of the Huskies did not think
his team was as poor as its show-
ing, and was high in his praise of
the Michigan machine.
His highly regarded passing
game seemed to evaporate in the
face of the hard-charging Mich-
igan line. His great ends had a
miserable afternoon on offense
and an even worse time on de-
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fense. His 'running game, crip-
pled by injuries to both first
string halfbacks last week
against Colorado, was totally in-
effective. In spite of it all, Cher-
berg managed a smile and said
that he would forget the events
of the day and plunge into the
task of facing a rugged Pacific
Coast Conference schedule.
Cherberg, a highly respected
high school coach in Seattle be-
fore he moved into the football
picture at the University of Wash-
ington, will undoubtedly bring his
team along to better things later
in the season. His debut has been
shaky, what with a one-point loss
to Colorado last week and yester-
day's nightmare in Michigan Stad-
ium, but he is well-liked by his
players and may yet make some
headlines in the coming weeks.
MICHIGAN'S inimitable Wally
Weber managed one of the short-
est appraisals that we have ever
heard him give concerning a foot-
ball game when he said, "Michi-
gan's multiplicity of offensive pat-
terns confounded the Huskies im-
measurably."

.4

NORMAN, Okla. --03 - Notre
Dame, with a flaming comeback
spirit to match the searing Okla-
homa's sun, rallied from early ad-
versities yesterday to whip Okla-
homa's Sooners, 28-21.
Ralph Guglielmi, an under-rat-
ed quarterback, took chafge of the
Fighting Irish of Notre Dame and
led them to victory in the torrid
opening game of the season.
Guglielmi scored one touchdown
and passed to Joe Heap for two
others.
jBUT CAPT. Don Penza shared
the plaudits of a sellout crowd of
59,500 heat-wilted fans. He block-
ed one Oklahoma kick and recov-
ered the ball to set up a touchdown
and recovered a fumble to pave
the way for another.
The game was played in in-

tense heat that reached 94 de- Irish justified their nickname by
grees in the shade and must matching Oklahoma touchdowns
have been well over 100 on the in each of the first two periods,
field. then ramming over two more in
* "' " the third quarter. Oklahoma's
IN TROUBLE from the first third score, on a 60-yard run by
kickoff, Notre Dame's Fighting Merrill Green, came too late.
-1
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Welcome Michigan Students
Back to Ann Arbor
We are no longer at the Arcade
or U of M Barber Shop on campus
but are now at
RAYTS BARBER SHOP
115 West Huron .. , opposite Bus Station

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