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September 26, 1953 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-09-26

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 26. 1953

DEVOTES LIFE TO WORK:
Famed Authoress Visiting University
<4> * * *

U'

Accepts $400,000 in

Gifts,

Grants

(4,

By RONA FRIEDMAN
"I never decided to be a writer,
I just was one," vivacious, gray-
haired Katherine Anne Porter,
prominent author who is now a
visiting professor in . the English
department, commented.
"At five," she added, "I was
writing some strange things and
at the age of six I realized that
I was constantly writing. How-
ever it wasn't until I was 25 years
old that I tried it seriously."
When Miss Porter was 29 years
old her short story titled "Maria
Concepcion" was published as part
of the volume "Flowering Judas"
which appeared in 1930.
* .* *
"MY LIFE and work," Miss Por-
ter said, "have been one thing."
She describes her life as a flowing
one with nothing forced. Things
just happened. "Like the time I
got a Guggenheim Fellowship for
creative writing to study in. Eur-
ope for a year," she recalled. My
husband was in the Foreign Ser-
vice so I just stayed on for nearly
six years.
Miss Porter who is teaching
contemporary poetry (English
170) at present, feels that today
there are more really serious or
good poets than prose fiction
writers. She thinks 'that al-
though novelists today are ex-
cellent technically they are not
covering life. "They are pessi-
mistic," she continued, "while
the poets aren't."
Poets are more tender and deal
with the two basic themes °of love
and death. "To me," she said, "it
seems as though poetry is on the
rise while fiction prose appears to
be following a level path."
To explain'her point she read
some poems from volumes of her
favorite contemporary poets which
included Harold Norse, Randall
Jarell, John Malcolm Brinnin and
William J. Smith.
"HOPWOOD contests," she said,
"are a good institution for they
help to draw publishers attention
to the new writers." "Also," she
continued, "for financial reasons
the Hopwood contests are a good
idea, for the real artist's path is
a perilous one."
The only danger, she added,
is the human falibility of judges
which sometimes results in the
choice of the wrong piece of
writing.
Lighting a cigarette, Miss Por-
ter described the time of her
youth, which is usually associated
County To Award
Courthouse Job
Washtena*'s Board of Super-
visors will decide Tuesday which
of six bidders, two of them from
Ann Arbor, will receive the con-
tract to build the new $3,250,000
courthouse.
Officials estimate the court-
house probably will not be finished
before mid-1955.

(Continued from Page 1)
A newly established fund for

having been given by the National
Academy of Sciences.
* * *

-Daily-Lon Qui

KATHERINE ANN PORTER
... A Fruitful Career

freshmen engineering students will TO FURNISH the large confer-
be called the Gannett Scholarship ence room in Cooley Memorial
Building, $5,315 has been given
Fund, operating on $10,000 given by the newly established Mervin
by Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Gannett of K. Baer Memorial Fund.
Chagrin Falls, Ohio. From the Ford Foundation,
* * * the Regents accepted $5,000 for
RESEARCH in bacteriology will purposes of advanced research
be aided by $8,020 in funds given training.
by Eli Lilly and Company. From From the University of Chicago,
the McGreagor Fund $7,500 for $3,500 for the Citizens' Committee
study on hereditary abilities was Research and Training Project
received by the University. was accepted, along with $3,500
from the Aaron Mendelson Me-
The Galen Work Shop Fund morial Trust Fund.
has been given $6,500 by the The Cooley Building Furnishing
Galen's Medical Society. Lab- Fund received $4,000 from the 1917
oratory equipment for the new class of Engineers and Architects.
Kresge Medical Research Bldg. The John Morse Memorial Foun-
will be purchased with the $6,- dation gave the University a $3,-
000 grant received from the Ke- 000 grant for scholarships. A like
waunee Fund. sum to create a Camp Davis High-
Two new $6,000 funds are be- way Training Program was donat-
ing established, one to be called ed by the Michigan Road Build-
the John and Mary Markle Foun- ers' Association, Inc.
dation Scholarship in medical sci- Pemphigus research will pro-
ence, and the other the James ceed on the $3,000 in funds given
Picker Foundation Scholarship in by an anonymous donor.
Radiological Research, the latter THE KIWANIS CLUB of Mich-
igan gave $2,800 for the Forney
Regents AppyClement Memorial Fund, and a
gj grant of $3,000 to establish a fund
1'i* for research in restorative dental
or B g A materials was given by the Tole-
do Dental Products Company.
u Loan Other business at the Regents
O ®-Sln meeting included three admin-
istrative appointments, Presi-
(Continued from Page 1) dent Hatcher announced. Chair-
man of the Department of Aer-
A onatical Engineering is Wilbur
According to 'University Vice- Clifton Nelson, replacing Prof.
President Wilber K. Pierpont, the Emerson W. Conlon who re-
process of filing preliminary ap- signed to accept a position in
plications with FHA normally business.
takes from two to four weeks. N. Edd Miller has been named
Pending preliminary approval assistant director of the Summer
of he oas b te gvenmetSession to take the place of
architects' sketches and specifi- George M. McEwen, who resigned
archtecs' kethes nd pecfi-his post to return to his position
cations will be prepared to sub- on the College of Engineering Eng-
mit for final government ap- lish faculty.
proval. John Graham Young was named
Pierpont declined to comment assistant to the dean of the Col-
on the course of action to be lege of Engineering and assistant
taken if the applications were re- professor of mechanical engineer-
jected by the FHA. ing. He will replace A. R. Hell-
worth as the dean's assistant.

PROMOTIONS approved at the
meeting include: Lawrence Hua-
hsien Louis, associate professor in
biochemistry in the medical school;
W. Wilbur Ackermann, associate
professor. of epidemiology in the
public health school, and William
Kerr, assistant professor in the
college of engineering.
Thirteen appointments to the
faculty have also been announc-
ed, including that of Dr. Su-
sanne Langer, visiting professor
of philosophy for the second
semester of 1953-54 to serve as
a temporary replacement for
Prof. Charles L. Stevenson.
Dr. H.- W. Welch Jr., previous-
ly a research physicist at the En-
gineering Research Institute, has
been named associate professor of
electrical engineering.

/ i

APPOINTMENT of an assistant
professor in naval architecture
and marine engineering was giv-
en to Kenneth Maddocks, and Dr.
Henry K. Schoch was appointed
chief of the medical service of the
Veterans' Administration Hospi-
tal. Dr. Albert Steigerwalt Jr. has
been added to the faculty of the
School of Business Administra-
tion to offer a course in the field
of business history.
Thomas J. Larkin was made
assistant professor of art in
the College of Architecture and
Design. Also in this college,
Frede Vidar was named assistant
professor of painting.
Miss Helen S. Pinkus has been
named assistant professor in
psychiatric social work by the Re-
gents.
Seven members of the facul-

ty have been conferred emeritus
titles by the Regents. They art:
Prof. Floyd Earl Bartell, chem-
istry department; Prof. Roy Wil-
liam Cowden, English department;
Prof. Frank Finch, engineering
drawing department; Prof. Jo-
sephy Cannon, electrical engineer-
ing department; Asst. Prof. Nor-
man Anning, mathematics depart-
ment and Assoc. Prof. Roy Ken-
neth McAlphine, chemistry de-
partment and Assoc. Prof.
partment.
Hayward Keniston was made
professor emeritus of Romance
Languages and dean emeritus of
the literary college.
Roger G. Kidston, '54, has been
appointed student representative
of the Men's Residence Halls for
a one-year term on the Board of
Governors of Residence Halls.

* * * 4
with the 'Lost Generation,' as an
era of rebellion and breaking up
of old forms and added, "a great
many of us were not lost at all."
"Today however," she said, "it is
the custom for the youth to be
free and there is no need for re-
bellion."
"But," she continued, "I've no-
ticed a tendency today among
young people to run to psychia-
trists whenever they are faced
with a problem instead of facing

'* .* *
up to the problem themselves.
They don't seem to realize that
their problems aren't unique, but
natural."
With a laugh she added that
to be adjusted to certain condi-
tions in this world and this so-
ciety would be a horrible thing."
It would amount to criminal col-
lusion with many evils," she said,
continuing, "I am not at all well
adjusted and have no intention of
becoming so."

'M' Band To
Under New1
When Michigan's Marching
Band presents its first perform-
ance of the 1953 season today,
Floyd Zarbock, '54A, new drum
major will be at the helm.
Zarbock, band twirler for four
years, will be followed by com-
panion twirlers Gurdon Patton,
'57, and Bill Modlin, '56.
FOLLOWING the three leaders
will be the largest Marching Band
in University history. One hun-
dred forty-six men and 11 alter-
nates will take part in today's per-
formance.
Boasting the largest tryout
class in many seasons, George
Cavender, assistant band con-
ductor, said several newcomers
were eliminated because they
were physically unable to march
as often and as strenuously as
the band requires.
Starting rehearsals less than
two weeks ago with about 50 band
men who had never marched
"Micliigan style,"' Prof. Revelli of
the music school, director of the

Perform
Drum Major
band, has succeeded in whipping
the group together for their first
snappy performance.
* * *
FOR THE pre-game show the
men will enter the field with their
200-step-a-minute cadence play-
ing Michigan's . fight song, "The
Victors." Spelling "MICH" as they
cross the field, the band will halt
and perform the "Star Spangled
Banner," under Cavender's direc-
tion.
As a salute to the visiting
team, the unit will quickly spell
"HI" as they play the Univer.
sity of Washington fight song,
"Bow Down to Washington."
The half time show will be de-
voted to an educational story of
how Band members trained, re-
hearsed and became part of a
highly precisioned machine, in
marching as well as playing.
DEMONSTRATING intricate
and fancy marching fundamentals,
the band will do each step slowly
as it must when initial drills be-
gin. After illustrating how it ap-
peared during the first week of re-
hearsals, the Band will conclude
the set by demonstrating the fin-
ished product.
After showing the old static
and unanimated steps that were
once in fashion, the band will
give life and a new twist to the
formation of a cat. While
humping the cat's back, moving
its feet and curling its tail, the
band will play Leroy Anderson's
popular tune "The Waltzing
Cat."
A dazzling dance routine will
be the next feature as the band
regroups playing the Tin Pan
Alley classic, "Alexander's Rag
Time Band."
To conclude activities the band
will leave'the field with the tra-
ditional "Hat's Off" routine.
The Block 'M' fiashcard section
will also perfoi'm during the game
and half-time ceremonies. Using'
two sets of colors this year, the
1,200-student group will present
displays during all home games
except the Iowa game, when
Michigan Band Day presentations
will honor high school bands.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
September 27-Reality
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings from
7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30 to
4:30.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Student Seminar: How Does One
Find a Personal Faith?
10:45 A.M.: Worship "Freedom Limited"
Dr. Abbey preaching.,
5:30 P.M.: Supper and Fellowship.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and Program. Dr. Harold
Bremer will speak on "The Christian Con-
science Demands Liberty."
Welcome to the Wesley Foundation Rooms,
open daily!

Present plans call for the Cou-
zens Hall project to get under way
early this summer with construc-
tion expected to take from a year
to a year and one-half, Pierpont
said.
Couzens Hall at present houses
255 student nurses. Expansion is
expected to bring the total capa-
city to about 530.
Whether this additional women's
housing space would be turned
over to nursing students will de-
pend on women's enrollment fig-
ures at the time of completion,
Pierpont commented.
1 ---

K

HELLO HANK!,
W. WHERE ARE
YOU GOING FOR
YOUR SNACK?
Meet me at . . .
George's Place
1104 S. University

--

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone 2-1121
Wm. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 AM.: Church School.
11,00 A.M,: "The Importance of a Choice."
7:30 P.M.: "Outward Appearance or Inward
RealIity?"
- 8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Prayer Meeting.
A Friendly Church where the Word is preached.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenow at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. 25-025. Office Ph. 7421
10:00 A.M.: Morning Service,
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service.

TYPEWRITING
SHORTHAND
ACCOUNTING
OFFICE MACHINES
A single subject or a complete course
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
William at State Phone 7831 39th Year

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
William and State Sts.
Minister-Rev. 'Leonard A. Parr
10:45 A.M.: Dr. Parr will preach on, "Possessive
Pronouns."
7:00 P.M.: Student Guild will meet in Mayfrower
Room. Prof. Howard McCluskey will speak on,
"Discovering Myself Through Education and
Religion."
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday, September 27-
9:30 AM.: Bible Study on Matthew.
10:30 A.B.: Church Worship Service in Center
Chapel. Sermon "What Is The Church" by
Pastor Yoder.
7:00 P.M.: Lutheran Student Association Meet-
ing. Student panel on "What Does Christian
Faith Mean to a Student."
NATIONAL LUTHERAN COUNCIL
(Lutheran Student Association)
Hill Street at South Forest Avenue
Henry O. Yoder, D.D. Pastor-Phone 7622
Friday, September 18-7:00 P.M.: Open House
for New Students at the Center-Hill at Forest.
Sunday, September 20--
9:30 A.M,: Bible Class
10:30 A.M.: Church Worship in Center Chapel.
Sermon by Pastor Henry O. Yoder.
7:00 P.M.: Lutheran Student AssociationMeet-
ing at Center. Speaker-Dr. Gerhard Lenskl,
Dept. of Sociology, "Faith and Educated Man"
Center is open daily from 8:00 A.M. - 11:30 P.M.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone 7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Pastor and Student Coun-
selor
9:45 A.M.: Student class studies "What Students
Can Believe About Themselves."
11:00 A.M.: Church worship. Sermon Topic:
"Ca lied To Be Teachers."
6:45 P.M.: Roger Williams Student Guild dis-
cussing "What Is Your Religious Age," led by
Professor W. J. Mc4cchie.
THE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw, Phone 20085
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian Church School and
Adult Group.
11:00 A.M.: Services of worship.
Sermon, "Progress Toward Union."
7:30 P.M.: Unitarian Student Group at the
church with transportation from Lane Hall at
7:15 P.M.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
William H. Bos, Minister to Students
rene Applin Boice, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service. sermon by Reverend
Hartland H. Helmich, "Christian Responsibil-
ity - 1953."
7:00 P.M.: Student Guild at Bethlehem Church.
Speaker, Reverend Hartland H. Helmich. Topic
"As Student To Faculty-Let's Be Specific."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Charles Mitchell, Assistant Minister
William S. Baker, University Pastor
Henry ,Kuizenga, Charles Mitchell, and
Willia Baker, Ministers
9:15 A.M.: Breakfast discussion, using the man-
ual, "Faith and Life."
9:15 and 11:00 A.M.: Morninq Worship.
Sermon by Dr. Kuizenga, "Response to a
Summons."
6:45 P.M.: Guild. Speaker: Robert Hastings,
prominent Detroit layman, "Putting Christian-
ity into Practice."

RIGHT o WRONG

+ 1
OMMMMEMMMM

I!.*~'

11

Big, Warm

Li

j~

LET'S ALL ATTEND THE
VICTORY DANCE
TON IGHT

9-12

UNION
MUSIC BY GIL MARTIN & ORCH.

BLANKETS... $10 and up
Uric's Bookstore

FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Lane Hall
11:00 A.M.: Sundays. Visitors welcome.
CONGREGATIONAL DISCIPLES
STUDENT GUILD
Guild House, 438 Maynard Street
Sunday evening meetings at the Congregational
Church. Program 7:00 P.M.
Tea at the Guild House every Tuesday, 4:30 to
6:00
Mid-Week Meditation in Douglas Chapel, Thurs-
days at 5:00
H. L. Pickerill, Director
Sue Gillespie, Assistant
Student Program Sponsored by
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and E. William St.
Rev. Leonard Parr, Minister
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship'
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y.M.C.A. Auditorium
Sundays: 10:15, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Thursdays: 7'30 P.M., Bible Study.
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth"
WXYZ-ABC Network
Sundays: 1:00-1:30 P.M.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 North Division St.
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Dr. Robert H. Whitoker, Chaplain for
Student Foundation
Mrs. Elizabeth M. Davis, Social Director
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 AM.: Holy Communion and Commentary
{followed by Student Breakfast, Canterbury

11

M

m

,

:"l

a t

WELCOME BACK

Come a "Runnin"

to

New Students, Old Students,
and Faculty
GOOD LUCK TO ALL
IN THE COMING YEAR

SENIORS!

r

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Saturday at 4:30: Open House after the Game.
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Worship Services,
with the pastor preaching on "Christ's Other

is

11 -A- f

Sian up for Picture

Housed
10:15-1:45: Junior High and High School Classes.
11:00-12:15: Church School <thru Grade 6).

ll

.-I

.

,.I

11

III

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