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September 24, 1953 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-09-24

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AGE TWO
schools Fail To Renew
Contracts With USAFI

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1953

By PAT ROELOFS
As the result of a contract clause
which would allow the Federal
government to "disapprove" of
university faculty members in the
armed forces educational program,
the University recently refused to
renew its program contract with
the defense department.
Presented with an inquiry last
summer on the possibilities of con-
tinuing the correspondence course
for men and women presently serv-
ing in some branch of the armed
forces the University declined to
renew the program at the time
because of the government favored
clause.
THE CLAUSE provided that the
contractor will not employ or re-
tain for the performance of ser-
vices under the contract such per-
sons as are disapproved by the
government.
According to Robert L. Wil-
liams, assistant dean of facul-
ties, University officials were
studying the proposed contract
including the above statement
when word was received from
Washington that the Armed
Forces Institute was sending a
Student Faces
AF Discharge
As 'Bad Risk'
(Continued from Page 1)
a Serbian immigrant also took the
anti-communist monarchist paper,
a fact not mentioned in the re-
port.
* ' e S e
UNDER MILITARY security
regulations, personnel can be dis-
charged if a "close, continuing as-
sociation" with Communists is
proven.
According, to Radulovich,
"close, continuing association" is
defined as living in the same
building, corresponding fre-
quently or calling frequently on
suspect people.
"I go into Detroit possibly twice
a month to have dinner with my
family, but I've never discussed
politics with my sister at all and
have never participated in poli-
tics except to vote," he recalled.
The young reservist lives in
Dexter hear Ann Arbor with his
wife and two children.
Job opportunities in meteorol-
ogy are largely limited to govern-
ment service, and Radulovich fears
he could never gain government
employment with a discharge for
security reasons.
Tuesday's hearing will be con-
ducted in secret with the recom-
mendation of the three-man board
going to the Director of Military
Personnel in Washington for final
action.
STUDENT LAMPS
aty
115 W. Liberty--Near Main

new contract, the contents of
which are still unknown.
The United States Armed Forces
Institute program began soon aft-
er the Pearl Harbor bombing at
the beginning of World War II
operating on contracts made with
educational institutions, about 50
in all, according to Williams.
DURING THE peak enrollment
in the courses, between 900 and
1,000 GI's were taking courses of
which mathematics, English, his-
tory, accounting, business law and
political science were most popu-
lar.
Three-hundred fifty members
of the armed forces took classes
at the University through mail
last year, according to Mrs. Al-
fred O. Lee, supervisor of cor-
respondence study.
Thirteen other universities have
declined to take part in the USAFI
program this year because of
the contract's restrictive clause.
Among them are California, Illi-
nois, Nebraska, and Minnesota.
A defense department spokes-
man reported at the time the un-
signed contracts were made pub-
lic that other educational insti-
tutions would probably supply the
courses formerly offered by schools
unwilling to sign new contracts.
A University spokesman com-
mented tlat the addition of the
clause, though a necessary "secur-
ity measure" the government is
taking, does renew the "delicate"
situation of encroachment on the
freedoms of a University and its
faculty.
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday).
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1953
VOL. LXIV, No. 3
Notices
1953 Regents-Alumni Honor Award
Winners. There will be a meeting of
all 1953 Regents-Alumni Honor Award
winners Thursday evening, Sept. 24,
at 8 p.m. in the Michigan League Ball-
room. Winners will be presented a Web-
ster's. New Collegiate Dictionary by the
Oreon E. Scott Foundation.
Marshall Scholarships for Study in

the United Kingdom. The British Gov-
ernment has announced the founda-
tion at British universities of 12 schol-
arships to be competed for annually
by United States graduate students.
The awards will express the United
Kingdom's gratitude for the generous
and far-sighted Program for European
Recovery. They will be known as
Marshall Scholarships.
Candidates must be citizens of the
United States, under 28 years of age
in the year in which the award will be
taken up, and must be graduates of an
accredited American university or col-
lege. The scholarships will be tenable
at any university in the United King-
dom. The awards will be: made for two
years in the first instance, but may
be extended for a third year.
The value of a Marshall Scholarship
will be £500-£600 a year, plus transpor-
tation. A married man's scholarship will
be increased by £200 a year. Selection
will be based on high academic achieve-
ment, character, other activities, and
the capacity to play an active part in
the United Kingdom university to
which they go.
Applications may be secured by writ-
ing to one of four regional centers. Can-
didates may apply either in respect of
the region in which they live, or in
respect of any region in which they
may have received at least two years
of college training. The Regional Cen-
ters are:
Eastern Region: British Consulate-
General, 350 Fifth Avenue, New York 1,
New York.
Southern Region: British Consulate-
General, National Bank of Commerce
Building, 210 Baronne Street, New Or-
leans 12, Louisiana.
Middle West Region: British Consul-
ate-General, 720 North, Michigan Ave-
nue, Chicago 11, Illinois.
Pacific Region: British Consulate-
General, 310 Sansome Street, San Fran-
cisco 4, California.
It is intended that three Scholar-
ships should be awarded every year in
each of the four regions. The deadline
for receipt of applications for the 1954-
55 competition is November 1, 1953.
Applications for Fulbright Awards for
graduate study or research abroad dur-
ing the 1954-55 academic year are now
available. Countries in which study
awards are offered are Australia, Aus-
tria, Belgium, Luxembourg, Burma,
Denmark, Egypt, Finland, France,, Ger-
many, Greece, India, Italy, Japan, the
Netherlands. New Zealand, Norway,
Pakistan, the Philippines, Thailand,
the Union of South Africa, and the
United Kingdom. The grants are made
for one academic year and include
round-trip transportation, tuition, a
living allowance, and a small stipend
for books and equipment. All grants
are made in foreign currencies.
Interested students who hold an A.
B. degree or who will receive such a
degree by June, 1954, and who are pres-
ently enrolled in the University of
Michigan, should request application
forms for a Fulbright Award at the
office of the Graduate School. The
closing date for receipt of applications
is October 31.
Persons not enrolled in a college or
university in the spring or fall of 1953
should direct inquiries and requests for
applications to the Institute of Inter-
national Education, U. S. Student Pro-
gram, 1 East' 67th Street, New York 21,;
New York. The last date on which ap-
plications will be issued by the Insti-
tute is October 15.
Applications for Buenos Aires Con-
vention Awards for graduate study or
research in Latin America during the
1954-55 academic year are now avail-
able. Countries in which study grants
are ,offered are Bolivia, Brazil, Chile,1
Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican
Republic, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras,

Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay,
Peru, and Venezuela. Grantees are
chosen by the host government of
each country from a panel presented
by the United States Government. The
United States Government pays travel
costs and the host governments pay a
maintenance allowance and tuition fees.
Grants generally are for one acade nic
year, but some may extend for twelve
months.
Interested students who hold an A.B.
degree or who will receive such a de-
gree by June, 1954, and who are pres-
ently enrolled in the University of
Michigan, should request application
forms for a Buenos Aires Convention
award at the office of the Graduate
School. The closing date for receipt of
application is October 31.
Persons not enrolled in a college or
university in the spring or fall of 1953
should direct inquiries and requests
for applications to the Institute of In-
ternational Education, U. S. Student
Program, 1 East 67th Street, New York
21, New York:. The last date on which
applications will be issued by the In-
stitute is October 15.
Cooperative Housing Applications are
now being accepted for the spring
and summer terms. Applicants are urged
to visit our houses in order to determine
their preferences. For invitations to a
free introduction dinner apply to Lu-
ther Buchele, 1017 Oakland, phone 6872,
1 to 5 p.m.
Student Sponsored Social Events list-
ed below are approved for the coming
weekend. Social chairman are remind-
ed that requests for approval for social
events are due in the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs not later than 12 o'clock
noon on the Monday prior to the event.
September 25-
Delta Theta Phi
Geddes House
Hinsdale
Mosher
Phi Delta Phi
Scott
Stockwell
September 26--
Acacia
Alpha Delta Phi
Alpha Kappa Kappa
Alpha Sigma Phi
Alpha Tau Omega
Beta Theta Pi
Chi Phi
Delta Chi
Delta Sigma Delta
Delta Sigma Theta
Delta Tau Delta
Delta Theta Phi
Delta Upsilon
Gomberg House
East Quad
Kappa Alpha Psi
Kappa Sigma
Phi Alpha Kappa
Phi Chi
Phi Delta Phi
Phi Kappa Sigma
Phi Rho Sigma
Phi Sigma Delta
Pi Lambda Phi
Sigma Alpha Epsilon
Sigma Alpha Mu
Sigma of Theta Xi
Theta Chi
Theta Delta Chi
Tau Delta Phi
Triangle
Zeta Beta Tau
September 27-
Delta Theta Phi
Phi Delta Phi
Lectures
University Lecture, auspices of the
Institute of r Industrial Health. "The
Role of Lighting Specification and Op-
tical Aids in Public Health," H. C.
Weston, Director of the Group for Re-
search in Occupational Optics, Insti-
(Continued on Page 4)

f" ! ,

y .. _ _._ _ _. ^, --- ----._ _._. e , a ._. ..
1

LOST AND FOUND
LOST. Green wallet containing import-
ant papers. Phone 2-1517. )lA
LOST-Impt. papers clipped together;
on Fri. or Sat. Reward. Phone 2-5117.
)3A
LOST-Shell rimmed glasses in brown
ca'se. Ph. 2-6514. )2A
FOR SALE
.SMALL WALNUT GATELEG table, $35.
One large oak sideboard, $5.00. One
large double coil springs, $15.00. One
upholstered chair, $1.00. One large
walnut veneer table and five chairs,
$25. One wool rug, $65. Two large wal-
nut veneer buffets, $15 each. One
small steel folding cot, $10.00. Large
davenport with green leatherette, $12.
Large childs coaster wagon, $4.00.
Phone 2-9020. )13B
1937 DODGE - good condition. Price
$100. Phone 2-8753. )8B
HARDLY WORN Canadian beaver fur
coat. Seven full strips, fashionable
cut. Owner moved south; sell at sac-
rifice. Phone 2-3541. )9B
PHILCO Radio-phono table model. Two-
speed automatic. $60. Ph. 8537. )4B
LIGHTWEIGHT BICYCLES-$51.95 and
up, service on all makes of bicycles.
Kiddie K~orner, 564 S. Main. Four
blocks from campus. )3B
Life Life Life Life
at 8c per copy; yes 8ci
See Miscellaneous. 2B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )14B
1942 CHEVROLET - Rebuilt motor,
radio, heater, and good tires. Phone
2-8753. )16B
YOUNG BUDGIES or Parakeets, also
singing canaries, bird supplies and
cages. 562 S. 7th, Ph. 3-5330. )15B
1952 CHEVROLET - Black four door,
radio and heater. Excellent condi-
tion. Very clean. Complete service
record available. Call 2-3246, 8 to 5
p.m. Monday thru Friday. )20B
KRANICH AND BACH Grand Piano.
Size M. $300. Phone 9039. )17B
PING PONG TABLE, man's new club
bag, GE stove, walnut sectional book-
case, radios, electric lawnmower, 2-
section ladder. Phone 3-5696 after
5 p.m. )19B
NEW 29-foot Globemaster trailer. Price
$2750. Phone University Hospital, Ext.
231 on Monday thru Friday. 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. )22B
TIME
8 mos. - $2 - (6c ea.)
LIFE
8 mos. - $3 - (8c ea.)
Phone Student Periodical Agency
6007 days, 25-7843 eves. )1B
SLIDERULES-K. & E. log log duplex
and Chemist's, with magnifiers; 24 in.
flexible curve. 3-0346. )27B
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

FOR SALE
1948 AUSTIN-Rebuilt engine. Good
buy at $200. Call 2-6520 after 6:00.
)26B
PERRY BICYCLE, $10, call 2-0808. )25B
BUY OF THE YEAR-Cushman motor
scooter, side car, top condition; name
your price. 1301 Prescott after 5. )24B
MODEL'S WARDROBE--Sizes 10, 12, 14.
Call 3-2740. )23B
GIRL'S Raleigh Bike, $30.00 1415 Gran-
ger after 5 p.m. )18B
1948 PACKARD-In excellent condition.
$625. Henry Sills, 120 Ingalls. )21B
FOR SALE-'41 Olds, 2 dr.; '39 Ford,
2 dr.; $65, choice. 2383 Jackson. )28B
LEWYT VACUUM CLEANER. 2 yrs old.
In excellent condition. Large supply
of paper filters. $30. 832 So. Main St.
FOR RENT
TWO NICE DRY basement rooms for
older men (one sleeping and one
study). Twin beds. Low rent, some
apt. privileges. 508 Monroe. )C1
ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS-Rooms for men with cooking
privileges. Prefer Graduate students.
Inquire 518 E. William St., 3-8454. )2D
OVERNIGHT GUEST ROOMS
Reserve rooms now for Football Week-
ends. Rooms by Day or Week. Campus
Tourist Homes. Ph. 3-8454. 518 E.
Williams St. (near State) )3D
HALF OF DOUBLE ROOM with grad-
uate student, $6.50 a week. Phone
2-1465, 923 Alivia. )5D
LARGE FRONT ROOM for rent near
campus, one or two students, call
3-8490. )4D
MALE MUSIC STUDENT is interested
in finding roommate to share large
double room in home 5 minutes from
campus. Room is well furnished, con-
tains grand piano. Must see to ap-
preciate. 406 Packard. )7D
ROOMS for male students. Cooking
privileges, Phone 3-2661. )6D
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS WANTED - Drive Detroit-AA
daily. Call Va 4-9231. )G1
RIDERS to Flint Fri.eafternoon return-
ing Sunday. Charles Kroll, 433 Wil-
liams. 2-4401. )2G1
ROOM AND BOARD

ROOM AND BOARD
STILL A FEW room and board openings
at 1617 Washtenaw. Room $30 per
month. Free linen and porterservice.
Board $2.10 per day for three meals.
Phone 3-2360. )2E
PERSONAL
DID you know that you could subscribe
to Time Magazine for less per issue
than a newspaper. See miscellaneous.
)1F
UNIVERSITY STUDENTS -- continue
your piano lessons at college with a
highly trained and experienced teach-
er. Beginners and advanced. Practice
facilities arranged. Phone 2-3541. )10B
HELP WANTED
"COLLEGE MEN AND WOMEN"-Want-
ed forquick earnings in your neigh-
borhood! Full time, part time, or
spare time sales! Any age! Any hours!
Big profits! Repeat sales! Guaranteed
product! Make as high as $10 in one
hour. Contact Mr. James Barker, 326
South Otsego, Jackson, Michigan, or
phone 2-9319. WRITE - PHONE OR
VISIT. )IH
STUDENTS for part time work eve-
nings. Michigan Recreation. Michigan
Theatre Building. )2H
SHOE SALESMAN-Part time, experience
necessary, excellent pay. Apply Masts,
121 S. Main or call 2-6326. )6H
WANTED-Certified teacher to work in
private nursery school mornings. May
bring nursery age child. Ph. 3-4066.
)7H
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES for some
dormitories are still wanted by Stu-
dent Periodical Agency. Make extra
money in your extra time. Phone
25-7843 after 8 p.m. )9H
MAKE $20.00 DAILY - Sell luminous
name plates. Write Reeves Co., Attle-
boro, Mass., free sample and details.
)8H
STUDENT KITCHEN HELP WANTED-
Contact house manager of Sigma Phi.
Ph. 3-4707. )1H
BABY SITTER 9:30-11:30 A.M. Mon.,
Wed., Friday, except holidays, for
semester. 3-5153.
GIRL needed; day per week for light
housework. Good wages. Ph. 3-1259
eve. )12H
WANTED-Students able to work any
morning, afternoon, or Saturday's
throughout the balance of the school
year. Apply at Nielsens Flower Shop,
1021 Maiden Lane. )13H
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING, Finished World, and Hand
Ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-
up and delivery. Ph. 2-9020. )2I

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITERS! Portable and Standard
for rent, sales and service.
MORRILLS
314 S. State St., Phone 7177
for delivery, Phone 2-9020 (61
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home -- Portable
Phono and T.V.
Fast and Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.V.
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
11, blocks east of East Eng. )5
KIDDIE COUNTRY CLUB-State ap-
proved nursery school has 7 openings
for children 3, 4, or 5 years. Daily
program Monday thru Friday between
9:00 a.m. and 12 noon. Transporta-
tion provided. Ph. 3-4066. )71
VOICE LESSONS-Call David Murray,
graduate voice major. Ph. 2-7036 be-
tween 6-7 p.m. )9I
MISCELLANEOUS
MAGS
at special student prices
Time ...,......,.....8 months. .$2
Life ....................8 months..$3
Colliers.................40issues. .$3
Sat. Evening Post ....35 weeks..$3.50
and 5000 others. Phone in your order;
pay when your copy arrives. Over 9000
student customers in six years of op-
eration will testify to their satisfac-
tion in Student Periodical Agency.
Phone 6007 days; 25-7843 eves. )2L
REAL ESTATE
HOME SITES on Huron River. Drive on
wooded area with beautiful view-5
miles west of Ann Arbor. Write Frank
J. Offer, 1710 Seyburn, Detroit, 14,
Mich. or call LO. 7-1495. )1O
6:30'
- - 55C
Re-opening FRIDAY
SINGIN', SWAYIN' and
FUNNIN' among the palmsi
t1

I1

BOARD for South-East campus area.
$2.10 per day. Three meals. Generous
refund policy. 1617 Washtenaw. Phone
3-2360. )lE
BOARD AT FRATERNITY-reasonable
rates. Call Alpha Chi Sigma, 1319
Cambridge. Phone 28312. )3E

Cit em'na S L Cuild

I

.. ..

Your Favorite

".

* LUNCHES
* HAMBURGERS
*CHILI
* TAKE-OUT ORDERS
Open nightly except
Saturday from 5 P.M. - Midnight
PAUL'S LUNCH
4149 E. Jefferson St.

Gilbert & Sullivan Society
Announces
for its'Fall production
PATIENCE
to be held
Thursday, Friday, and Sunday
Consult D.O.B.
for Time and Place

I

FREDERIC MARCH
EDWARD O'BRIEN

DAN DURYEA
ANN BLYTH

Saturday 7:00 & 9:00
Sunday 8:00 only

50c

--- presents
BETTY DAVIS and MIRIAM HOPKINS
in
"THE OLD MAID"
with GEORGE BRENT
Thursday & Friday 7:00 and 9:15
Lillian Hellman's
"Another Part of the Forest"
with

Architecture Auditorium

Corner Tappan and Monroe Streets

1

I'

I

ALSO
"TITANIC"
Clifton Barbara
WEBB STAN WYCK

CN~ICOLOR

pi ~ ~ r i

TODAY

Prices -- This Show Only!
Mats, 60c, Eves, & Sun. 80c

Continuous from

P.M.

.... .

a

-5

WHAT'LL YOU HAVE?
. More Leisure Time
Y Better Grades
You can have both because
SWIFTHAND gives you complete
and letter-perfect class notes IN
ONE WEEK.
OWIFTHAND is an amazing natur-
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eliminates the complicated symbols
of old-fashioned shorthand and sub-
stitutes an easy-to-learn system
based on the alphabet and on select-
ed shorthand shortcuts.
Written by noted Gregg-Pitman
expert, M. E. Zinman, SWIFTHAND
is now in its 5th edition and con-
tains a dictionary of the 1200 most
frequently used words.
Thousands of college students,
journalists and stenographers have
learned self-instructing SWIFTHAND
IN ONE WEEK. u kn 2
SWIFTHAND
429 Bayview Blvd. $ O
Norfolk, Virginia
Check, Cash, CODS
Does-
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NOW

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Phone 3-5651

An Intimate Theatre
Bringing Cinema Triumphs
From All Nations

I

REOPENING
FRIDAY
AT 6:30 AM.

New York critics chose "The
White Line" as one of the ten
best of the season!

Football Experts!
TN
CURTI

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F

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ivil Ikeir

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i n ntrodutin

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J CO-STARRING.
IflDs MrIifl

t

Set down in a torrent of conflicting emotions by a man who'd felt and fought and lived

I

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