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January 15, 1954 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-01-15

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'" ~ fI CHIGATN DAILY

FRIDAY, JANUARY 15. 1954

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'IT

DOM TOWN:
Oil Discovery Affects Clinton Business
By ERIC LINDBL'OOM.
and LEE MARKS_
Although it does not quite live
.p to the Hollywood conception of
an oil boom town, Clinton, Michi-
gan is nonetheless undergoing a
rapid change as a result of the oil
discovered on the Curtis farm
shortly before Christmas.
Already 10 independent oil com-
panies are drilling in the vicinity
of the first wildcat strike, with
more expected every day.
* * *
THE AVERAGE merchant in X
Clinton hasn't been affected yet
by the discovery of oil but the
town is waiting for "big" things yet
to. come. As one businessman put A ~ ~'
it, "Sure, there's been a slight in-
crease in business all around, but
right now the whole town's wait- rt4
ing. If a couple more companies
move in, this town will really start
to roll."
Another pointed out that Clin-r
ton has been visited by some of{

Possibility

1

Of OilBoom"
Seen in City
Clinton's oil boom may flow ov-1
er into Ann Arbor, it was learnedj
yesterday.
Speculation raged over the pos-
sibility of oil being discovered in
the Ann Arbor area. Oil men seem
to feel that the Curtis farm for-
mation may run in a southwest-
northeast line. This would place
Ann Arbor directly in line with
the Clinton strike.
City officials have already
been approached by one oil com-
pany for permission to drill on
city owned property just west of
Ann Arbor airport.
Prof. Kenneth Landis of the ge-
ology department commented, "Ev-
en if oil is discovered in Ann Ar-
bor, it would not be profitable to
drill. In fact, most cities prohibit
it. As far as the township is coi-
cerned, there is just as much
chance of oil being discovered here
as there was in Clinton a month
ago."
According to Prof. Landis, it
was still too early to tell whether
the Clinton oil strike is a "boom
or a bust."
"Lightning can strike here as
well as in Clinton but it will be
at least another week before
anyone knows the extent of the
oil discovery," the geology pro-
fessor added.
City officials declined to com-
ment on the effect the discovery
might have here, claiming that
any remarks a this time would be
premature.┬░

Library Fines
Students who have unpaid
fines at the General Library
must clear their records by Jan.
29 or they will be sent to the
Cashier's office and the stu-
dent's credits withheld until
fines have been paid.
Books 'borrowed from the
General Library or its branch-
es are due Wednesday.
Students having special need
for certain books between Jan.
20 and 28 may retain such
books for that period by re-
newing them at the charging
desk.

AAU Discusses Investigations
The American Association ofGrdeAceyothecnms
University Professors. last nigh,,t acn Vl oft en-i5
consideied problems raised by cur- department, Rou~ert A4ngell of !tle
rent congressional investigations sociology department, Paul Kaup-
at a meeting in the East Confer- er of the law school and Edwin
ence Rm., Rackham Bldg. Moise of the mathematics depart-
The discussion was led by Profs. ment.

LAW ROOKS

the leading executives of the top
oil companies. "Some of the big
men from Standard Oil Co. have
been nosing around here in the
last few days-and when they
perk up and get interested,
something big's in the air."
The lobby of Clinton's only ho-
tel is crowded with independent
"wildcaters." These men symbo-
lize the real change that's come
over Clinton. Many of them are
just here to size up the situation;
others are busy making deals and
waiting for reports from their
foremen.
"IT'S STILL too early to: tell,
but this might turn out to be a
realy important strike," comment-
ed the owner of one of the small-
er drilling companies. Another re-
marked, "We don't know yet, but
it looks good and we've got our
fingers crossed."
Out at the location of the first
strike, a crew of six was work-
ing in the bitter cold, sinking a
' two inch pipe into the ground.
Commenting on the scientific
methods of detecting oil, the fore-
man said, "You can use gravity
meters to detect"structures beneath
the ground that indicate the pre-
sence of oil, but the only way to
find out if you've got it, is to sink
a hole-and see what's down there."

Serum Saves
Austrian Boy
Serum flown 4,500 miles from
the Michigan State Health Lab-
oratories to Austria recently sav-
ed the life of an eight-year-old
boy.
The boy, Gottfried Eder, had
been bleeding from hemophilia, a
a rare disease in which the blood
doesn't clot, since an infected
tooth was pulled Friday.
The serum, anti-hemophil glo-
bulin which stopped the uncon-
trolled, bleeding, was flown into
Austria by the United States Air
Force. Two drivers delivered the
serum by jeep over snow-choked
Alpine roads to the Innsbruck
Children's Clinic where the boy
lay close to death.
Dangerous new bleeding had.
begun a few hours before the ser-
um arrived but the boy was pro-
nounced out of immediate danger
after it was administered.
The last lap of the mercy flight
was flown after midnight in peri-
lous flying weather

OVERBECK BOOKSTORE
THE LAW BOOKSTORE

Everything for
the Law student

RIGGERS-The crew on the Curtis farm makes final preparations for the resumption of the oil flow.
Organ Recital
David Craighead, American or-
gan virtuoso, will give a guest re-
vY cital at 4:15 p.mn. Sunday in Hill
Auditorium.
His program will include: "Con-
certo in A minor" by Vivaldi-Bach;
S"Chorale Fantasia, 'How Brightly
Shines the Morning Star' "< by
Buxtehude; "Vivace" from "Sec-
and Trio-Sonata" and "Toccata in
F" by Bach,.

1216 South University

1

WY RENT A TUXEDO'

FOR J-HOP

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-Phatos by Chock Kelsey
WILDCATTERS-Speculation on the importance of the strike
waxes hot in a hotel lobby.

HILL AUDITORIUM

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone 7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Pastor and Student Coun-
selor
9:45 A.M.: The Student Class continues its
discussion series with "What Students Can
Believe About the Lord's Supper."
.11:00 A.M.: The Morning Worship Service.
"Strength and Weakness," - Rev. Loucks.
6:45 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild. Dr. Merrill
Abbey will discuss "Means to Gain World
Order."
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-42,05. Office Ph. NO 8-7421

February 12th
TWO SHOWS: 7:15 P.M. - 9:30 P.M.

AN

10:00 A.M.: Morning Service.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEl
William and Thompson Sts.

L

Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00 A.M.
Sunday at 8-9:30 A.M., 11-12.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings 7:30 P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in Father Richard Center.

f -.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 & 10,45 A.M.: Identical Worship Services,
"What Is New Life in Christ?"
Dr. Abbey preaching.
9:30 A.M.: Student Seminar, Pine Room.
7:30 P.M.: Informal discussion on The Student
and His Religious Problems.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily.
THE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw, Phone NO-20085
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Adult Group-Kenneth Leisenring
discussing "The Ethics of Albert Schweitzer.
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian Church School.
11:00 A.M.: Service of Worship-Rev. Edward H.
Redman preaching on: 'David Hume."
7:30 P.M.: Unitarian Student Group. Transpor-
tation from Lane Hall at 7:15.
Services conducted every Sunday.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:00 A.M.: Matins Service.
10:00 A.M.: Bible Class
11:00 A.M.: Worship Service.
7:00 P.M.: Lutheran Student Assn. Meeting.
Speaker-Frank Norman, Medical Student.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone NO-2-1121
WrA. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M.: Sunday School Classes for all ages,
11:00 A.M.: "Seeking A Bride."
7:30 P.M.: "Handfuls On Purpose."
Wed. 7:30 P.M.: Prayer Meeting.
You are cordially invited to come and worship
with us. A warm welcome awaits you here.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
William H. Bos, Minister to Students
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 North Division St.
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Dr. Robert H.Whitaker, Chaplain for
Student Foundation
Mrs. Elizabeth M. Davis, Social Director
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Student
Breakfast).
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Commentary
(followed by Student Breakfast).
10:15-10:45: Junior 'High Classes.
11:00-12:15: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer and Sermon.
1215 P.M.: After-Service Fellowship.
5:30-7:30: Youth Group Skating Party.
6:00 P.M.: Student Supper Club, Canterbury
House.
7:00 P.M.: Adult Confirmation Class, Lounge.
8:00 P.M.: Evening Prayer dnd Commentary.
During the Week: Wednesday and Thursday 7:00
A.M. Holy Communion followed by Student
Breakfast; Canterbury House open daily
throughout exam period for study, snacks,
and mutual commiseration; Thursday 12:15
P.M. Luncheon Seminar for Episcopal Faculty
Members, Canterbury House; Friday 12:10
P.M. Holy Communion; Friday 7:30 P.M.
Canterbury Club.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
(Formerly at Y.M.C.A.)
Sundays: 10:15, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays: 7:30 P.M., Bible Study.
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ-ABC Net-
work Sundays: 1:00-1:30 P.M.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
William and State Sts.
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
10:45 A.M.: Church School and Nursery.
Public Worship. Dr. Parr will preach on "Encoun-
ters with God's Facts." There will be a recep-
tion of new members. After the service, there
will be a coffee hour. Mrs. Ernest Evans, Mrs.
A. L. Jacoby, Mrs. Paul Leidy, and Mrs. J. C.
Winton will serve as hostesses.
7:00 P.M.: Student Guild will meet at Guild
House for an open house.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M: Sunday Morning Services..
Jan. 17-Life.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings from
7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30 to
4:30.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Sermon: "Playing With Fire."
Nursery for children during service.
9:45 A.M.: Church School.
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Open House at Guild House at 7:00 P.M.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER

11

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