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January 10, 1954 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-01-10

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PAGE SIB

. THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JANUARY 10. 1954 '

PAGII SIX SUNDAY. JANUARY 10. 1954

- - - ___mmmmw

COLLEGE ROUND-UP:
Schools Turn To Finals,
'Dead Week' Problems
By MARTHA RASCI

Men From Museum,. Resources School Count Deer

i

I .

11

i t n_

during the pre-final week, instruc-
With final exams coming up on' tors are not allowed to give hour
many of the nation's campuses, examinations or off-schedule fin-
most student interest deals with als. All term reports must fall due
finals and discussion over the before this period, called 'dead
"dead period" preceding finals. week.'

At the University of Illinois,
there is serious thought of start-
ing the same program that the
University of Texas now uses, that1
is, a "dead week" before finals.
AT THE University of Texas,
Senior Board
Undertakes
Degree Survey
"Does ,it make a difference to
you if your daughter or son re-
ceives a 'token' degree, or would
you prefer an official graduation
at which your daughter or son re-
ceives the official diploma?"
The Senior Board is undertak-
ing a survey amo1g paients of the
senior class to ascertain their op-
inion on this question. Letters have
been sent out by the board inquir-
ing 'of the parents which type of
graduation they would prefer and
if they plan'to attend their daugh-
ter's or son's graduation.
Last spring the administration,
established a new system involving
an earlier taking of final exams
so that senior's grades might be
recorded in time to allow them to
be officially graduated. This re-
placed the former method which
presented the seniors as "candi-
dates for a degree upon comple-
tion .of requirements."
Economics Club
To Hear Tobin
" Prof. James Tobin of the De-
partment of Economics at Yale
University, will speak at 8 p.m. to-
morrow at the Rackham Amphi-
theater.
The guest speaker, working un-.
der the . Carnegie Research Fel-
lowship, conducted research at the
Survey Research Center. Prof. To-
bin's topic is "Expenditures on
Durable Goods by Identical House-
holds for the Two Years 1951 and
1952."

To give the students an added
incentive for needed prepara-
tion, Texas refuses to allow any
social events during the preced-
ing weekend.
Among Smith College students,
sophomores are most prone to cut
classes. A recent poll showed 58
percent of the sophomores cut class
at least once a week. They cut for
three main reasons, studying for
exams, dull classes and out-of-
town weekends that conflict with
Saturday classes.
The Smith student newspaper,
the Sophian, commented, "The
reasons or excuses for missing
class reveal neither maturity nor
responsibility."
Kaiser LayOff
]results Told
According to a survey made in
Detroit since the lay-off of nearly
16,000 Kaiser Motors Corp. em-
ployees in July, Ypsilanti and Wil-
low Village were hardest hit by
unemployment, and are now in a
s t a t e of "localized economic
slump."
Laid-off members of Local 142,
the Kaiser UAW union, were sent
questionnaires by surveyors. Five
hundred seventy-five of the form-
er KM workers from Ypsilanti and
Willow Village reportedly have ap-
plied for jobs but are unemployed,
This makes the highest number.of
non-working persons for any
single community involved in the
mass lay-offs. Ann Arbor has 72
unemployed Local 142 members at
present.
More than 1,000 of laid-off mem-
bers have been integrated into the
working force of the General Mo-
tors Corp., the study revealed.
Rabbi To Speak
Rabbi Arthur J. Lelyveld, Na-
tional Director of B'nai B'rith Hil-
lel Foundation, will speak on the
subject "Three Decades of Service
to Youth" at 3:30 p.m. today at the
Hillel Foundation.

Sixty men from the natural re-
sources school and the University
museums spent yesterday morn-
ing tramping through the woods
and swamps of the Edwin S.
George Reserve near Dexter, coun-
ting the deer and other forms of
wildlife found on the area.
During the annual "deer drive,"
in which men line up evenly spac-
ed and walk two miles to the op-
posite fence, 18 bucks and 56 does
and fawns were seen.
According to Prof. Wafren Chase
of the wildlife management de-
partment, the museum-owned re-
search property of 1,268 acres will
support only 50 deer and the sur-
plus will be harvested and the ven-.
ison sold under special permit.
This income supports the inves-
tigations carried on there during
the year.
Foxes, rabbits, grouse, pheasants,
quail, hawks and owls were also
observed. The Foresters' Club ob-
tains the venison for their annual
Venison Roast in May from this
Reserve.

JANUARY

DRESSES

'1
_w
T

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Wools, rayons, two-
piece suits, corduroys,
velveteens, jersey
Sizes 9 to 18
Values up to 22.95

$1000

-Daily-Rupert Cutier
'DEER DRIVE'-Students and faculty members gather to begin the two mile "tramp through the
woods to count wild life" (See upper picture). Two deer are seen running across the reserve near
Dexter in the lower picture.

DRESSES

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Spring
'54

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Sizes 9 to 20
Values up to 27.50
FORMALS
Long formals, short for-

X1495

mnats, nets, crepes, taf-
feta, velvet combina-
tions I
Sizes 9 to 16

... tonic to the winter-U
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uSKIRTS
Values up to 7.95

$398

IN AT LBERYyAN

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