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January 10, 1954 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-01-10

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Y

SUNDAY, JANUARY 10, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

!

JildcattsSu
Michigan Grappiers Nip
Illint in Thriller, 19-11
Wrestlers Win Second Straight on Road
As Wolverine Stars Take Five Matches

rprise

M y

Q ulltet

MSC NIPS ILLINI:
Hoosier Cagers Blast Minnesota Five

I

Special to The Daily
CHAMPAIGN - The Michigan
wrestling team continued on its
winning ways as it defeated a
tough Illinois squad, 19-11, be-
fore a crowd of 1,200 wrestling
fans here yesterday afternoon.
This was the first loss of the
season as against three wins for
Coach "Pat" /Patterson's Illinois
team. Patterson, in his fourth
year as head coach at Illinois, is
still In quest of his first victory
over a Michigan wrestling team.
He had whipped his team up to
f ever pitch in hopes of getting the
victory badly wanted-but to no
avail.
IT WAS AN uphill fight for the
Wolverines. They trailed early in
the contest, 6-0, and with two
matches to go were behind 11-9.
But Michigan had it in the clutch,
as it won those last two matches
to defeat the Illini.
The most exciting event was
fought in the 137-pound class
where "Snip" Nalan defeated
Bill Turner, 7-5. Nalan, captain
of the Michigan squad and both
Big Ten and NCAA champ, had
to go all out to defeat the un-
heralded Turner.
In the 123-pound class, highly
regarded Dick Meeks of Illinois'
defeated sophomore Charlie An-
U

derson, 11-4. Meeks, who was a
strong favorite, has placed third
in the last two NCAA Champion-
ships.
* *
YUKIO MATSUMOTO, captain
of the Illini squad, defeated sopho-
more Frank Hirt, 6-2. Hirt, who
was victorious at Bloomington Fri-
day, now has a record of one vic-
tory and one defeat.
Andy Kaul continued on his
winning ways as he defeated
Ed Jackson, 8-3, in the 147-
pound class. Kaul, a junior from
St. Mary's, Pa., finished as run-
ner-up in the Big Ten in the 137-
pound group last year.
In the 157-pound class, sopho-
more Don Haney won his second
match in as many days as he de-
feated Frank Kastor, 13-4. Kastor,
who was twice state champion in
Illinois, was behind from the be-
ginning and didn't have a chance.
* * *
LARRY TEN PAS, Illinois' most
outstanding grappler, pinned John
McMahon in the short time of two
minutes and 50 seconds. Ten Pas,
who is undefeated in four matches
this year, is a sophomore from
Waukegan, Ill.
Michigan forged ahead when
"Pepper" Holt pinned sophomore
Richard Dix in 6 minutes and 59
seconds in the 177-pound class.
In the final match of the day
varsity football player D i c k
O'Shaughnessy pinned s e n i o r7
Paul Mechling in 4 minutes and 57
seconds. O'Shaughnessy, confer-
ence champion for the last two]
years, had little trouble with his
opponent.
The summaries follow:
123 - Richard' Meeks (I) defeated
Charles Anderson (M), 11-4
130 - Yukio Matsumoto (I) defeated
Frank Hirt (M) 6-2
137-Norvard Nalan (M) defeated Bill
Turner (1), 7-5
147 - Andy aul (M) defeated Ed
Jackson (I), 8-3
157 - Don Haney (M) defeated Frank
Kastor (I), 13-4
167- Larry Ten Pas (I) pinned Jack
McMahon (M), 2:50
177 - Harold Holt (M) pinned Rich-
ard Dias (I), 6:59
Heavyweight - Dick O'Shaughnessy
(M) pinned Paul Mechling (I), 4:57

Maize and Blue Five Falls
To NU Fourth PeriodRally
<By WARREN WERTHEIMER
Special To The Daily
Michigan's ever brightening o Cat Nap
prospects in the Big Ten basket- MICHIGAN G F P T
ball race suffered a setback last Josoy, f 2 1 0 1
night at the hands of the North- Codwell, f 2 2 .2 6
Wildcats,, c 2 xI5.
western Wildcats,s72-60. Mas, c)2 5 2
The contest, which was closely Allen, c 0 0 0 0
faddy,g 5 1 1 i1
fought for three periods, was bro- Barron, g 7 5 4 . 19
ken open by a hustling Northwest- Pavichevich, g o 0 1 0
ern five in the last moments of Vawter, g 0 0 0 0)
tegm.Totals 20 20 23 60
the game.
* * * NORTHWESTERN G F P T
Le Buhn f 3 0 2 6
HARVEY WILLIAMS, starting Ehman f 6 7 7 19
in the center slot as usual, drew Grant,'c 6 7 4 19
three personal fouls in the first Petrancek, c 6 3 8
period and was replaced. The Bragiel, g 1 0 4 2
quarter ended with the two squads Kurka, g 2 3 3 7
deadlocked at 16-all and continued Stoeppelwerth, g 3 5 3
nip and tuck with the scoreboard TotaN 8
reading 33-32 in favor of thel MICHIGAN 16 16 16 11-60
Wildcats at intermission. NORTHWESTERN 16 17 20 19-72
Williams returned in the third Free throws missed: Michigan,
period only to foul out after Mead.fs y "orgnso, Barron 2
3:30. Milt Mead replaced Wil- Northwestern, Ehmann 6, Grant,
liams, but he too seemed plagued [Petrancek 2.
by fouls and left the game with Totals 22 28 20 72
five personals after 4:50 of the
fourth quarter. Wildcats made good on 22 of
The third quarter ended with them for a .250 shooting average
the Wildcats leading 53-49. The while Michigan only got 68 tries
fourth quarter told the story. At at the hoop and sank 20 of them
the three minue mark the Wol- for a .294 shooting mark.

By The Associated Press
MINNEAPOLIS-Indiana, with
the poise and class of a champion,
rolled back the challenge of jit-
tery Minnesota. 71-63, last night
before 18,872, largest crowd ever
to watch a basketball game in a
college-owned arena.
The defending Big Ten and
NCAA titlists shifted their cus-
tomary scoring reliance from 6-10
Don Schlundt to guard Bob Leo-
nard and reserve forward Dick
White, and the Gophers were never
in serious contention.
Leonard, a brainy play-maker,
slammed in 20 points and White,
a vicious fighter under the board,
had 17. Schlundt, who missed
much of the last half after com-
mitting his fourth foul, scored 12,
and was used mainly as a diver-
sion.
* * *
MICHIGAN STATE 60,
ILLINOIS 59
EAST LANSING - When only
one second was showing on the
time clock, forward Julius Mc-
Coy hit with a free throw to give
Michigan State a 60-59 decision in
a tight and tense Western Con-
ference basketballgame with fav-
ored Illinois last night.

McCoy, a sophomore newcomer
to MSC from Farrell, Pa., also was
leading scorer with a high of 27
points for the game.
OHIO STATE 91, PURDUE 74
COLUMBUS-Ohio State's scor-
ing twins, Robin Freeman and
Paul Ebert, scored 61 points be-
tween them as Ohio State defeated
Purdue 91-74 in a Western Confer-

ence basketball game here
night.
Freeman scored 32 points
Ebert 29.

IOWA 71, WISCONSIN 54
IOWA CITY-Iowa broke up a
hard-fought Big Ten conference
game with a red hot scoring
splurge in the final quarter to
whip Wisconsin 71-54 last night.

4
r

last
and

NEW
LOCATION:
422 Hamilton
Place

K. Jewell

R. Jewell

"SNIP" NALAN
. .. wins again

';l
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t
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OUR BARBERS SAY
rWe thank you for your
Patronage and cooperation
- our,.aim is for the best
in personnel, workmanship,
service, and sanitation."

Pucksters Top
Michigan State
(Continued from Page 1)
Coach Amo Bessone's club
couldn't get its attack organized
but just before Hebert stepped
back on the ice right wing Wel-
don Olson managed to slip the
puck across the goal crease out
of a scramble in front of the
net.
Ikola was down on the ice fol-
lowing a save on a shot by de-
fenseman.John Polomsky.
* * *
LESS THAN a minute and a
half later, referee Ed Sabbe had
two State players deposited in the
penalty box and the Wolverines
promptly took advantage of the
opportunity to go ahead again, 2-1.
Right Wing George Chin scor-
ed the goal when Schiller de-
flected MacFarland's center-out
on to Chin's stick ten feet in
front of the net. The stocky
Lucknow, Ontario's senior, easily
flipped the disc past the screen-
ed Spartan goalie.
Ten minutes later MacFarland
collected the insurance marker to
give Michigan a 3-1 win.
STATISTICS
FIRST PERIOD-Goals - none.
Penalties-Michigan - Dunn (rough
acng) l 2:3 Mullen (holding) 7:0
MacFarland (illegal check) 13:00;
Dunn (hooking) 13:47; Philpott
(high sticking) 14:36; MacFarland
(roughing) 17:16. Michigan State-
Nicoli (roughing) 2:33; Polomsky
(elbowing) 3:30; Poiomsky (charg-
ing) 10:33; Nicoll(high'sticking)
13:47. +
SECOND PERIOD - 1-Michigan-Mac-
Farland (Philpott) 9:31.
Penalties - Michigan - Chin (high
sticking) 12:59; Cooney (roughing)
13:55; Cooney (charging) 17:14.
Michigan state-King (high sticking)
12:59; Suave (roughing) 13:55; King
(interference) 17:14.
THIRD PERIOD - 2 - Michigan State-
Olson (Polomski) 5:36; 3-Michigan-
Chin (MacFarland, Philpott) 6:58;
4-Michigan-MacFarland (Chin, Mul-I
len) 16:54,
Penaties-Michigan-Hebert (board-1
checking) 3:35; Cooney (elbowing 4:I
13 Dunn (board-checking) 10:43;j
Dunn (cross-checking) 18:29. Michi-
gan State-Polomsky (holding) 5:14;
Gipp (tripping) 6:50; Gipp (trip-1
ping) 15:40.

The Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

All those men interested in
being a baseball manager this
spring please contact me at
NO 2-4551.
-George Beauchamp
verine attack broke down and
Northwestern got its last nine
points by virtue of the double
foul rule.
STATISTICS however, point up
the real basis of the Michigan de-
feat. The rangy Wildcats out-re-
bounded the Maize and Blue five
50-39. This edge was provided
mainly by the fine work of center
Hal Grant of the Evanston five.
Northwestern took consider-
ably more shots than the Wol-
verines. Of their 88 shots, the
Michigan Gets
NCAA Meet
The nation's biggest track ex-
travaganza will be held in Ann
Arbor this June.
The college coaches, in their!
annual meetings in Cincinnati,
awarded the NCAA meet to Mich-
igan for June 11 and 12.
Maize and Blue Coach Don
Canham, who was in Cincinnati
to make the bid for the Wolver-
ines, reports that the discussions
concerned the date of the meet
as well as the place it would be
held.
The Championships are usually
held later in the month, but part
of the reason Michigan gained the
nod as host for the first time was
that Ann Arbor will have a ready-
made crowd on hand for the dates
finally chosen, since the dates fall
within graduation week when a
plentifulsupply of alumni and
students will be in town.

1
i
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t

Northwestern's most potent wea-
pon of the evening was the al-
ternating pivot of Hal Grant and
Frank Petrancek who together
garnered 27 points, 19 and 8 re-
spectively. The ineffectiveness of!
the defense was shown up by the
fact that both Williams and Mead
fouled out while guarding the cen-
ter post.
In commenting on the game,
CoachcPerigo said that the team
looked sluggish. He ' added that
Milt Mead did a good job under
the boards for the squad.
Many observers felt that the
loss of captain John Biever be-
cause of ineligibility would hurt
the Northwestern attack but this
failed to materialize as the Wild-
cat five worked with its usual pre-
cision.

ZI3T Wins
Volleyball Cro wn
Zeta Beta Tau won the so-
cial fraternity volley ball title
Friday by blanking defending
champion Sigma Phi Epsilon,
4-0.
For ZBT it was sweet revenge
over a Sig Ep team that elim-
inated the new champs in last
season's volleyball final. Star-
ring for the victors were Dick
Klien, Morris Weiss, and Larry
Ravik.

FPE at fischers
SECIALLY PRIC

1'.

Spot reducing,
body contouring massages and steam baths,
Phone NO 2-6428 for information or appointment.
OPEN EVENINGS FOR APPOINTMENTS
K& R.J2 Health Studios
422 Hamilton Place

11

HAIRSTYLING
for particular men
featuring
PRINCETON CUTS
CREW-CUTS FLAT TOPS
N EW-YORK ERS
The Dascola Barbers
Near Michigan Theater

Dorothy Gray
Beauty Creams
Special Dry Skin Mixture
$4 size.....1.75* 2.25 size. ... .$1*
Cellogen Hormone Cream, $5 size. .2.50'
Hormone Hand Cream, 2.50 size...1.25*
Three of your favorite aids to skin beauty
at prices way below regular! Special Dry.
Skin Mixture is ideal as a night cream;
Cellogen Hormone Cream helps counter.
act dryness; Hormone Hand Cream cart
keep hands soft and smooth even in Win.
ter weather. Stock up now on each one!
and save!

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Sunday Night Supper Club
ao 6:00 P.M.
Menu: Noodle soup, corned beef sandwiches, a vegetable,
potato chips, hot or cold tea
Price-75c for members . .. $1 for non-members
HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 HILL STREET

S rtiI

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Worried
ABOUT
FINALS?
Relax to the Music
of
PAUL McDONOUGH
BLUE BOOK BALL
Saturday, January 16, 9 P.M.
MICHIGAN UNION

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BOOK SALE

L scRT AT -FT
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'/2 OF F

Underdog North Edges South,
20-14 In Senior Bowl Clash

SELECTED
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HUMOR TRAVEL'
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(ADVERTISEMENT)
AT THE SIGN
OF THE TWIN PINES

MOBILE, Ala.-(A)-An under-
dog North team, fired ty the pass-
ing of Northwestern's Dick Thom-
as and the running of Villanova's
galloping Gene Filipski and Ralph'
Felton of Maryland, upset a pass-'
minded South team, 20-14, yester-
day in the Senior Bowl football
game.
Zeke Bratkowski, the nation's
number two passer from Georgia,
strove mightily to keep Steve
Owen's Southern forces in the
game with his bullet tosses. But
the South couldn't match the su-
perior running and defense of Paul
Brown's North team.
* * '*
THOMAS, who ranked 10th na-

tionally in passing, tossed a 63-
yard touchdown pass to John Ry-
an of Illinois, scored once him.
self on a quarterback sneak from
three inches out, and started an-
other touchdown drive with a 19-
yard screen pass to Felton.
One of the bright spots in the
South's backfield was the run-
ning of Tommy Lewis, the Ala-
bama fullback who gained na-
tionwide publicity by making an
off-the-bench tackle of Rice's
Dick Moegle in the Cotton Bowl.
His 26-yard end run sparked the
South's first touchdown drive.
Bratkowski brought the crowd
of 28,174 to its feet time after
time with his long passes.

-1

IL El

Year Subscribers!
r
if you are
CHANGING ADDRESSES
between semsters
please notify the
Circulation Department

Who lives at the sign of the
twin pines?
Men and women students on the
undergraduate and graduate level,
Americans and foreign students,
live in the six houses on campus
that display a twin pine symbol.
The pines are the symbol of the
American Cooperative Movement
and the houses are student co-ops.
Who Owns and'Manages Each
Co-op House?
Each student who joins co-ops
becomes part owner and manager
of the house in which he lives.
Just as any owner proud of his
property he helps to plan and
cook the meals, choose a new
couch for the living room or help
decide on the color of the paint
to be used in the hall.
And, if the co-oper is a par-
ticularly consciencious proprietor,
who helps to keep his house run-
ning at a top level of efficiency,
he and his housemates may be
rewarded at the end of the semes-
ter with a cash dividend derived
from savings on the cost of oper-
ating the house.
How Much Time Does a Co-op
Member Spend on House Duties?
A co-oper is primarily a student.
The scholastic level in co-ops is
usually high. Each co-op mem-
ber, therefore tries to learn'to run
his house in the most efficient,
most time saving wav nossible, so

On the average the rate for
room and board comes to about
$12 a week.
This rate is about /3 less than
that of any other housing unit
on campus.
Do Co-ops Have Boarders?
Each co-operative house has
some facilities for boarders. Board-
ers are full members of the house
and may use all facilities.
Each boarder pays about $8
weekly-and contributes approxi-
mately four hours of work.
Who Is Eligible to Join Co-ops?
U. of M. co-ops accept appli-
cants strictly on the basis of the
order in which they apply.
There is absolutely no discrim-
ination because of religion, race or
political belief.
One of the co-op houses on cam-
pus has even made special ar-
rangements to accommodate stu-
dents with certain religious dietary
restrictions.
What Sort of People
Live in Co-ops?
Members of S.L., Daily Editors,
stars of University dramatic pro-
ductions, Hopwood winners as well
as people who do not care to par-
ticipate in campus activities have
lived in co-op.
In co-ops no pressure is put on
any member to conform to a norm
of participation in activities or a

'
,. ,.
°. ° ''
4
"
4 "
t "
\ f "
i

for a
CLEAN
FUTURE
in '54

I

Il START THE NEW YEAR RIGHT! II

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