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January 09, 1954 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1954-01-09

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JANUARY 9, 1954

I lbi

President Hatcher
& the Judiciary

PRESIDENT HATCHER'S assurance that
regular disciplinary channels will be
used if any student should be called before
a Congressional committee and be guilty of
"serious misconduct" before the group is
about as cheering a statement as could be
expected.
No students here are known to have
been subpoenaed by the Clardy Commit-
tee, which is rumored to be waiting for
the current Smith Act trial in Detroit to
end before descending on Detroit, prob-
ably late this month or early in February.
So the president's statement that what-
ever he said was "theoretical" is quite cor-
rect. Still, it certainly is comforting to hear
President Hatcher say:
"I want to assure students absolutely that
fair play and justice will prevail here in
everything we do."
A statement like this could be an empty
generalization, but the president's statement
of Thursday night, together with his letter
to the Joint Judiciary Council and the opin-
ions expressed at his discussions with Judic
members at the end of November make it
ring true.
The president has said that if a student
should be quilty of serious misconduct be-
fore a committee, "we would regard it as
we would view any other charge of miscon-
duct, and if it were the kind of case which
were normally referred to the Joint Judici-
ary Council, it would be so referred."
This means that the University is not
just taking a "wait and see" attitude un-
der conditions where practical politics
might -make that the most expedient posi-
tion, but is guaranteeing in advance that
a case of misconduct will be treated as a
case of misconduct, on its individual mer-
its, regardless of whether the misconduct
takes place on campus or in a committee
hearing room.
Student Legislature hag asked the presi-
dent to take a definite policy stand on how
disciplinary cases arising from the hearings
would be handled. Considering that no one
here is known to have been subpoenaed, and

that justice requires judgment based on in-
dividual cases, the president's refusal to
adopt a blanket policy, accompanied by his
assurance that the usual just procedures
would be followed, seems to be a fair and
reassuring position.
The Student Legislature demand was bas-
ed on an overly simple view of the possible
relations a student might have to an inves-
tigating committee. SL waned assurance
that a student would not be disciplined
merely for being called before a committee.
It is clear that the University agrees on this
point from the discussion at the meeting be-
tween Judic and the President.
SL wanted assurance that mere refusal to
testify would not be a reason for discipline.
On this point, the president has not met the
demand directly, but he has said that a
student called before a committee "certain-
ly would be given full protection of his
rights under American law." Although he
has personally expressed the hope that any
student called "would respond honestly and
frankly, as befits a citizen of this 'nation
exercising his freedom," he has also implied
that refusal to testify, by itself, would not
be a reason for discipline.
The SL's third request was that a stu-
dent's testimony would not subject him to
discipline unless he broke the law or tried
to represent the University. Unfortu-
nately, adopting a rule like this in ad-
vance would straight-jacket the Univer-
sity. If a student hurled insults at the
Committee, or otherwise conducted him-
self in a manner unbefitting a member
of the University community, the Uni-
versity should reserve the right to con-
sider disciplinary action in his case and
not guarantee in advance that a student
can do anything, except the two things
mentioned by SL, without fear of action.
H-owever, the theory that a flexible pol-
icy is preferable to rigid guarantees assumes
that justice will really be done on an indi-
vidual basis. President Hatcher's statements
appear to justify this assumption.
--Jon Sobeloff

ON THE
Washigion Merry-Go
with DREW PEARSON

WASHINGTON-One of the chief things
President Eisenhower emphasized dur-
ing his bipartisan talks with Democratic
and Republican Congressional leaders was
that not one scrap of information must leak
to the press. Not only did the President
himself emphasize this, but Secretary of
Defense Wilson backed him up.
Wilson told how he and his aides in the
Pentagon had prepared a secret report re-
lating to cutting down the Army which he
planned to submit to the White House.
"No decision had been reached en this
report because the President hadn't even
read it," the Secretary of Defense told
the White House conferees. I kept it right
on my desk. Imagine our amazement,
therefore, when, next day, while it was
still on its way to the White House, the
substance of the report was published in
the press. It was the fastest leak I ever
saw."
"Well, you can't blame that one on the
Democrats," piped up Democratic leader
John McCormack of Massachusetts.
* * *
HEADLINES AND FOOTNOTES
NEW YORK'S GOV. Tom Dewey still
seems to have his eyes on bigger poli-
tical things. He has recently been wooing
the labor bosses. Dewey has reminded them
that his man, Secretary of Labor Mitchell,
is running the Labor Department and that
Sen. Irving Ives of New York, another Dew-
ey Republican, is a key man on the Senate
Labor Committee . . . . Secretary of State
Dulles clashed with Secretary of Agriculture
Benson at a recent cabinet meeting over
Benson's two-price farm plan. Benson's
idea was to support domestic farm prices,
but force far'mers to sell their surnlus over-
seas at the world market price. Dulles ob-
jected that this amounted to dumping our
surplus and would upset world trade .. .
Sen. Joe McCarthy is at loggerheads with
his chief counsel, Roy Cohn, who has been
whispering behind the boss's back. Cohn
tried to transfer to the rival spy hunters,
headed by Indiana Sen. Bill Jenner, but he
was afraid of antagonizing McCarthy.
Meanwhile, McCarthy is trying to find
another lawyer of Jewish faith so he won't
risk the charge of anti-Semitism if Cohn
leaves . . . . Russian diolomats, who turn
their charm on and off according to in-
structions from' the Kremlin, are now bub-
bling over with good will. They are telling
Western diplomats that the upcoming Big
Four meeting in Berlin can settle the dif-
ferences between East and West . . . . Bud-
get boss Joe Dodge is trying to close down
Merchant Marine hospitals in order to save
money .... The Army's new guided missile.
the Nike, now being installed to protect key
cities from air attack, will be manned by
National Guard units . . . . South Carolina
politicians are taking up a collection to buy
a bench for Gov. Jimmie Byrnes so he cn

Pennsylvania Avenue toward the White
House, for .which he has to pass a diffi-
cult legislative program. There you will
usually find Joe, as everyone on Capitol
Hill calls him, with a big pile of papers
on his desk.
The speaker apologizes for his papers. "A
newspaperman," he says, "can never get his
desk cleaned up. It's a disease." (Most peo-
ple don't know, incidentally, that the Speak-
er is a newspaper publisher by profession
and a politician by choice, being the owner
of the North Attleboro, Mass., Chronicle.)
Down the narrow corridor from Joe Mar-
tin's private office is the private office of
ex-Speaker Sam Rayburn.
"I like to have an office over here where
I can slip in to see Sam," Martin told this
writer, when I asked why he didn't use his
big office at the front of the Capitol. "Sam
and I have a lot of things we have to work
out from time to time.
"Sam is a good friend and a square shoot-
er to work with," continued the Speaker
when asked about cooperation from the
strong and growing Democratic minority.
"We differ, of course. That's the American
way of things. But Sam's word is as good
as his bond. Never has he ever violated his
word to me, nor, I hope, I to him. And on
questions of foreign policy and so on, I
know I can count on Sam to help pass the
President's program.
"As a matter of fact," said Joe Martin,
"healthy opposition is a good thing. It
will keep the Republican Party on its
toes. I think that Sam himself recog-
nizes it would have been better if the
Democrats had had more opposition in
the early days of Roosevelt. At that time
we had only 80-some Republicans in the
House, and if they had had more oppo-
sition, certain elements in the Democratic
Party couldn't have put across certain
policies.
"It's going to be an interesting session of
Congress," concluded the Speaker philoso-
phically, "and at times a tough one. But
when policies are for the ¬ęgood of the
country, you can predict the Democrats and
Republicans will pull together."
* * *
BROWNELLISM
ATTORNEY GENERAL Brownell recently
called all the government's top security
officers to a meeting at the National Ar-
chives Building, warned them that the meet-
ing was highly secret. Under no circum-
stances were they to talk to any newspaper-
man.
Here's the probable reason why he didn't
want any leaks.
The Attorney General laid down the law
that in the future anyone who quits the
government before being cleared for se-
curity is to be listed as having quit while
under investigation. Even though a gov-
ernment worker quits to take a better job,

Housmg's Place
In the System
A CLEARER PHILOSOPHY of housing's
role in the over-all education function
of the University can be seen in the Inter-
House Council's action setting up a program
of "housing orientation."
. Under the new plan residence hall men
will for the first time be able to have at
their disposal a frank picture of the op-
portunities and obligations offered by oth-
er living units, fraternities, co-ops, pri-
vate dwellings and residence halls, from
men now connected with them.
Admittedly the plan harbors dangers and
it will be necessary for all participating
groups to be responsible for keeping the
program educational and informative.
Should it degenerate into a selling cam-
paign for any one group its value will be
lost.
Implicit in the motion passed by IHC
Thursday is the idea that the men can best
be served by being helped to find the type of
housing best suited to their social and eco-
nomic needs. Moreover, there is the impli-
cation that under the present system some
men in a haphazard manner fall into the
right living environment while far too many
others go through the University never ac-
tually satisfied with their living quarters.
The IHC plan should, if it works out, pro-
vide a positive way in which freshmen, af-
ter having lived the required year in the
quads, can chose where they wish to spend
the next three years.
The place where a student lives, the
other men he meets, the exchange of ideas
that goes on, the social activities open to
him, the tone of the surroundings, are
just as formative and part of the educa-
tion he receives as his classroom studies.
It is in his housing unit that the student
has the opportunity to develop social poise
and expand and expound the vast collection
of ideas he is exposed to. His activities there
should complement and round off the class-
room side of life in natural way without
artificial social programs and guidance.
The IHC has taken a step toward the re-
alization of such a more beneficial housing
program but it now remains for the Univer-
sity to match it with one of its own.
In recent years there has been a devel-
oping trend of attracting students to the
University solely on the basis of its high
caliber physical plant, research facilities
and classroom instruction. No emphasis
is made by the University on the aspects
of its housing program designed to develop
in the men basic social and cultural quali-
ties that characterize a complete Univer-
sity education.
In the housing orientation program the'
IHC has taken another step in the right di-
rection.
-Gene Hartwig
At Hill Auditorium.. ..
University Symphony Band, William D.
Revelli, Conductor, and Michigan Singers,
Maynard Klein, Conductor.
SEVERAL MAJOR WORKS performed last
night more than compensated for some
undistinguished music on what was un-
deniably an overlong program (over two
hours, including intermission). These works
were: Folk Song Suite by Vaughan Wil-
liams, Sonata sopra "Sancta Maria" by
Monteverdi, and the Symphony for Brass
and Percussion by Alfred Reed. There is
little to be said about the Vaughan Williams
work except that it is utterly delightful in

its lack of sophistication and the freshness
of its melodic material, and that it was
excellently performed. The Monteverdi
work, characterized by rhythmic . vitality
and gracious, flowing melodic lines, is com-
posed of several sections of contrasting
tempo. The design of the work is truly im-
pressive in its control of the elements of
unity and variety. Dr. David, of the Music
School, who adapted the work for chorus
and band, is to be commended for demon-
strating that music such as this deserves to
be heard, not relegated to textbooks. The
Reed Symphony has plenty of harmonic
cliches, but it has many qualities which
cause one to overlookthis. The form is
tight and logical, the rhythms are powerful,
and the scoring is superb. The performance
here was perhaps the most exciting of the
evening.
In addition to their participation in the
Monteverdi work, the Michigan Singers
also presented several numbers a cappella.
Josquin's beautiful Ave Verum Corpus did
not go as well as it did on the recent
concert by the Singers, but Ginastera's
O Vos Omnes was performed exceedingly
well. Two movements from Bruckner's
Mass in E minor were performed with
Marilyn Mason at the organ.
Shorter band works by Grofe, Mendels-
sohn, Respighi, Gallois, and Werle were
played, in addition to Rimsky-Korsakoff's
Trombone Concerto. In the latter work
Bruce Whitener was an admirable soloist
(except for one or two slips) but the con-
certo itself is no credit at all to its com-

"Say, Bud -- To Settle An Argument-"
. AN
'1 ) ',' r

4kw T.+s Wgpy 6TnA rosy +

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
University of Michigan
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
IIORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
January 18 to January 28
For courses having both lectures and recitations, the time
of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitations only, the time of class is the time of
the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined at
special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
EDITOR'S NOTE-Officials have reported that extra
copies of this examination schedule will not be printed for
distribution.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that in case of a conflict the conflict
is arranged for by the class which conflicts with the regular
schedule.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.

TIME OF CLASS

TIME OF EXAMINATION

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
theaday preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday).
SATURDAY, JANUARY 9, 1954
VOL. LXIV, No. 78
Notices
Master of Arts in Teaching. A pro-
gram in the Division of General Stud-
ies, providing liberal and professional
training for a teaching career in (1)
Junior Colleges (2) Secondary Schools
(3) Elementary Schools (Foreign Lan-
guages only in Elementary Schools) is
being offered by Yale University. A
five-year program is being developed,
including a four-year B.A. degree with
a major in the student's proposed field
of teaching as well as the basic courses
in Education and followed by a fifth
year leading to the M.A. degree. Qual-
ified men and women, graduates of
colleges of liberal arts or scientific
schools, may enroll for the fifth year
of this program. A few scholarships of
$500 to $1500 are available for deserving
students. Application for scholarships
must be made before Feb. 15, 1954.
Further information may be obtained
at the Graduate School Office, and if
desired, an appointment can be ar-
ranged with Mr. Douglas W. Peter-
Oson, Assistant to the Director of the
program, for January 27, in the Rack-
ham Building.
Sciece Teacher for West Africa. The
Bureau of Appointments has beennoti-
fied that there is a position open to
organize the science department of an
independent non-sectarian secondary
school InNigeria, WestAfrica.rInter-
ested persons may call the Bureau of
Appointments, NO 3-1511, Extension
2614, Room 3528 Administration Build-
ing, for further information.
Art Print Loan Collection pictures
are to be returned to 510 Administration
Building from Jan. 11 to 15 between
9 and 12 a.m. and between 1:30 and
5 p.m. A fine of five cents a day will
be charged for overdue pictures. Next
RACKHAM GALLERY EXHIBITION,
Feb. 3-5; sign up for prints Feb. 8 and
9. Each student must bring his or her
own validated ID card to reserve a pic-
ture. A rental fee of fifty cents per
picture will be charged. Each student
will be allowed one picture until fur-
ther notice.
Academic Notices
DoctoralrExamination for James Vo-
lant Baker, English Language and Lit-
erature; thesis: "The Subterranean
Fountain: The Role of the Uncons-
cious in Coleridge's Theory of Imagi-
nation," Sat., Jan. 9, East Council Rm.,
Rackham Building, at 1:30 p.m. Chair-
man, C. D. Thrope.
Doctoral Examination for Gerald Van-
Halsema, Bacteriology; thesis: "The Re-
action of Certain Biologically Active
Materials with Cells Derived from Nor-
mal and Malignant Tissues of the Rat,"
Mon., Jan. 11, 1566 East Medical Bldg.,
at 2 p.m. Chairman, W. J. Nungester.
Concerts
Marian Anderson will give the fourth
concert in the current Extra Concert
Series under the auspices of the Uni-

versity Musical Society Sun., Jan. 10, at
8:30 p.m., in Hill Auditorium. Franz
Rupp will assist Miss Anderson at the
piano. Her program will include a group
of songs by Bach, a group by Schubert;
the aria, "Mon coeur s'ouvre a ta voix"
from "Samson et Dalila" by Saint-
Saens; songs by Tschaikowsky, Dvorak
and Quilter; and four Negro spirituals.
Tickets are available at $3.00, $2.50,
$2.00, and $1.50 eachat theoffices of
the University Musical Society daily,
until noon Saturday; and will be on
sale at the Hill Auditorium box office
after 7 o'clock on the night of the
concert.
Events Today
square Dance. All students and fac-
ulty welcome. No admission charge.
Sponsored by SRA. Lane Hall, this even-
ing, 8 to 12 p.m.
Coming Events
The varsity Debate Squad will meet
Tues., Jan. 12, at 7:30 in Room 3-A of
the Union. Plans for next semester will
be announced and assignments made.
Professor Hermann Kleereloper, Mc-
Master University, will speak and show
movies on Sound Receiptions and Re-
sponse in Fishes, 2116 Natural Science
Bldg., Mon., Jan. 11, 8 p.m., under the
auspices of the Departments of Fish-
eries and Zoology.
Economics Club. Professor James To-
bin, of the Department of Economics,
Yale University, will report on the re-
search he hss been conducting at the
Survey Research Center during his ten-
ure as Carnegie Research Fellow on
Mon., Jan. 11, 8 p.m., Rackham Amphi-
theater. His topic is "Expenditures on
Durable Goods by Identical House-
holds for the TwobYears 1951 and 1952."
All staff members and graduate stu-
dents in Economics and Business Ad-
ministration are especially urged to
attend. All others are cordially invited.
Undergraduate Math Club. There will
be a meeting Monday evening, Jan. 11,
at 8 p.m. in Room 3A of the Union.
Prof. Darling will speak on "How to
Make a Decision." The faculty is asked
to remind their students. All interested
are invited to attend.
Lydia Mendelssohn Box Office, north-
ern end of the Michigan League, will
open at 10 a.m. Monday for the sale of
tickets for the Department of Speech
production of Moliere's classic French
comedy, TARTUFFE; OR, THE IM-
POSTOR, which will be presented in
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre at 8
p.m. Wednesday through Saturday, Jan.
13, 14, 15 and 16. Tickets are $1.20-90c-
60c with a special student rate of any
seat in the house for 50c in effect
for the Wednesday and Thursday per-
formances.
f_

MONDAY
TUESDAY

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
4
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Tuesday, January 26
Monday, January 18
Wednesday, January 20
Saturday, January 23
Monday, January 18
Monday, January 25
Thursday, January 28
Thursday, January 21
Monday, January 18
Wednesday, January 27
Tuesday, January 19
Friday, January 22
Monday, January 25
Thursday, January 28
Thursday, January 21
Saturday, January 23

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5

I.

'C

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

9.

Psychology 31
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32
German 1, 2, 11, 31
Zoology 1
Botany 1, 2, 122
Chemistry 3
Sociology 51, 54, 60
Political Science 1
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54

Monday, January 18
Tuesday, January -19
Wednesday, January 20
Wednesday, January 20
Friday, January 22
Friday, January 22
Saturday, January 23
Tuesday, January 26
Tuesday, January 26
Wednesday, January 27

2-5
2-5
2-5
2=5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

t

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

Drawing -3
English 11
MM 136
CE 23, 151
Drawing 2
EE4, 5
EM 1, 2
PE 11, 13
CM 124
Drawing 1
MIE 135
CE 21, 22
Chemistry
PE 31, 32,
Economics!

3
131
53, 54

Monday, January48 >
Monday, January 18
Monday, January 18.
Monday, January AB
Tuesday, January 19
Tuesday, January 19
Wednesday, January 20
Thursday, January 21
Thursday, January 21
Friday, January 22
Friday, January 22
Saturday, January 23
Saturday, January 23
Tuesday, January 26
Wednesday, January 27

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

F:

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts be-
Jtween assigned examination periods must be reported for ad-
justment. See bulletin board outside Room 3044 East Engineer-
ing Building between January 4 and January 12 for instruction.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for
all applied music courses (individual instruction) elected for
credit in any unit of the University. For time and place of
examinations, see bulletin board in the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF MUSIC

'4

THE SAME Constitution which
gives the government power to
protect itself against treason also
provides certain rights for citizens
who have been accused but not
tried. I am convinced that the bal-
ance that must be struck between
the powers of government and the
rights of citizens has been upset
by adrecent evetn-Attorney Gen-
eral Herbert Brownell's use of an
FBI report for political purposes.
Mr. Brownell stated in his testi-
mony before the Senate Internal
Security subcommittee that the
speech he had given before a
luncheon club in Chicago referred
"to the case of Harry Dexter White
and the manner in which it was
treated by the prior Administra-
tion to illustrate how successfully
espionage agents had been in pen-
etrating our government at that
timn arcr how vrx our L'overrnent

Sixty-Fourth Year
Edited and managed by students of
the University of Michigan under the
authority of the Board in Control of
Student Publications.
Editorial Staff
Harry Lunn............Managing Editor
Eric Vetter ..................City Editor
Virginia Voss....,.... Editorial Director
Mike Wolff........Associate City Editor
Alice B. Silver..Assoc. Editorial Director
Diane Decker........Associate Editor
Helene Simn......... .Associate Editor
Ivan Kaye.................Sports Editor
Paul Greenberg.... Assoc. Sports Editor
Marilyn Campbell.......Women's Editor
Kathy Zeisler:... Assoc.. Women's Editor
Don Campbell.......Head Photographer
Business Staff
Thomas Treeger......Business Manager
William Kaufman Advertising Manager
Harlean Hankin. .. .Assoc. Business Mgr.
William Seiden........Finance Manager
James Sharp......Circulation Manager
Telephone NO 23-24-1

Courses not covered by this
sary changes, will be indicatedc

schedule, as well as any neces-
on the School bulletin board.

Xe tte ,
TO THE EDITOR
A Proust .. .
To the Editor:
DURING the Wednesday night
meeting of the Student Legis-
lature, announcement was made of
the removal of George Denison

move him. Nor was any attempt
made to notify Mr. Denison prior
to the announcement at the meet-
ing, nor was he given any oppor-
tunity to explain or answer to
this charge prior to his removal.

Thus the common practice of
the Legislature to act first and
think later has resulted in an un-
democratic and unjust removal of
an elected representative of the
students. The method and pro-
cedure followed in this case is a
direct contradiction of the Legis-
lature's practice to respect the
rights of students and their policy
of democratic student government.

I

_. -..

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