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January 05, 1954 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-01-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE ST~

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JAMJA1~Y ~. 19~4

ON TO T HE NATIONAL:
'U' Student Wins State Beauty Contest
By LEE MARKS
Rosaline Sappington, '56, has
been chosen to represent the state
of Michigan in the first National -
College Queen Contest, to be held
at the Di Lido Convention hail in
Miami Beach, on Jan. 8, 9 and 10.
A board of judges headed by . *
Bess Myerson, Miss America of
1945, chose the individual state
contestants, basing their decisions
On "50 per cent beauty and 50 per
cent brains." Miss* Sappington, a
pre-law student, had to submit a
250 word essay entitled '"What A
College Education Means To Me."
MISS SAP'PINGTON, who has Zam
won several other beauty contests,
was at Boyne Mountain with the
University Ski club wheni a tele-
gram arrived with the news of
her victory. "I was so excited, I *
ran out into the hotel lounge and I ^6

E ngineers
SEngineering graduates plan-
ning to graduate in February,
June or August of 1954 may pay
their class dues daily at either
of the following offices:
Engineering Mechanics Of-
fice of the West Engineering
Bldg.
Chemical Engineering Office,
Rm. 2028 of the East Engineer-
ing Bldg.
(Continued from Page 1)

Construction
Plan Okayed
(Continued from Page 1)

V

told the whole ski club I'd won.
Soon the telephone started ring-
ing," the attractive winner com-
mented.
Miss Sappington left for Mi-
ami this mornings wheire she will
spend two weeks as the guest of
a Miami Beach hotel. As Michi-
pington has aray receve a
expensive wristwatch, some per-
fume and an engraved plaque,
from the contests' sponsors.
be distributed to the winners of
the Nationa contet, incldimn a
wristwatch, a two-tiered white fox
fur, a sewing machine, and a two-
week, all-expense paid vgcation
Although the University prohib-
its campus elections for the pur-
pose of choosing college queens,
it does not prevent students from
competing in nation-wide contests.
Two Exhibits
On Displa
At 'U' Museumn
Two exhibits, "Watercolors and
Drawings by Gavarni" and "Per-
sian-Hindu Miniatures," are on
display this month at the Museum
of Art. ,
Circulated by the Smithsonian
Institution, the fifty Gavarni wat-
ercolors and drawings disclose less
familiar achievements of this hu-
morous French nineteenth century
artist, better known in this coun-
try for his lithographs.
The works represent two
phases of Gavarni's artistic de-
velopment. The first covers his
extended sojourns in England in
1847 and 1849. "Peasant Girl
Smoking," "English Beggar" and
'The Barmaid" belong to this
period, characterized by a com.-
plicated watercolor technique
employing brilliant highlights.
The second phase begins in 1851
after his return to France and lasts
until his death in 1866. "Reverie,"
"Two Actors," "Chocolate Vendor"
end "Head of a Woman" were done
in this period. .
Works in these years are done in
pencil heightened with colored inks
In shades of red, green and brown.
The collection of 21 Persian,
Moghul and Rajput miniatures
from the collection of the Port-
land, Ore., Museum of Art are on
display In the North Gallery.
Candidate Brake
To Speak T oday
The only -candidate for the posi-
tion of Michigan's governor to
date will speak at 8 p.m. today
in the Allenel Hotel.
State Treasurer D. Hale Brake,
the sole candidate from either par-
ty for the gubernatorial post, re-
cently announced his candidacy on
the Republican ticket'.
A committee ofnine loa citi-
open to the public. A question and
answer period designed to reveal
the candidate's views will follow
his talk.
Bales To Speak
On Personality
Harvard University research as-
sistant Robert F. Bales will dis-
cuss "A Study of Combinations of
?ersonalities that Can Maintain
Stable Groups" at 4:10 tomorrow
in Auditorium A, Angell Hall.
The public talk will be presented
under the auspices of the Depart-
ment of Sociology. Bales is asso-
ciated with Harvard's Department

of Social Relations.
O y the Best
Buy BALFOUR
iiYour campus headqirters for

-Daily-Chuck Kelsey
ROSALINE SAPP1NGTON STUDIES IN MOSHER -LOUNGE

FOUR CONCERTS SCHEDULED:

'U' To Hold M
1,500 Expecte
More than 1,500 students and
music instructors from Michigan
and other states will attend the
ninth annual midwestern confer-
ence on school vocal and instru-
mental music here Friday and Sat-
urday. .
The meeting is designed to help
music teachers meet not only their
immediate practical problems but
-those of their profession in its re-
'lationship with other areas of
music and education.,
THE CONFERENCE will be
sponsored by four groups-the
Michigan School Band and Or-
chestra Association, Michigan
School Vocal Association, Michi-
gan Music Educators Association
and the University music school
and extension service.
More than 370 selected high
school musicians will participate
in the conference, holding all-
state band, chorus and orches-
tra concerts.
Opening the weekend concerts,
the orchestra will perform at 2:30
p.m. Friday in Hill Auditorium.
The all-state band will give a con-
cert at 2:30 p.m. Saturday in Hill
Auditorium. At 3 p.m. Saturday,
othe all-state chorus will perform in

!usic Meeting;
di on Weekend

the, Michigan Union Ballroom.
This group will be accompanied by
the ' Ann Arbor High School a
capella choir.
Opening session of the confer-
ence will be held at 9:15 a.m.
Friday in the Union Ballroom.
This meeting will be highlighted
by a talk by Howard Ifanson,
contemporary compOser and
dean of the Eastman Scho'ol of
Music in Rochester, New York.
One of the conference's main at-
tractions will be a public concert
by the University Symphony Band
under the direction of Prof. Wil-
liam D. Revelli at 8:30 p.m. Friday
in Hill Auditorium. Also partici-
pating in this concert will be the
Michigan Singers, conducted by
Prof. Maynard Klein of the music
school.
Union Student
Offices Move
To irst F loor
Student offices of the Union
opened their doors for business at
a new location yesterday.
Formerly situated in the third
floor of the Union building, the
student offices are now located on
the first floor just a few steps
down the hall from the main desk.
Although moving operations
began last Saturday, the trans-
fer is not expected to be conm-
pleted until the end of this week.
Union staffmen are now in the
tedious process of carrying rec-
ords and other standard office par-
aphernalia down from the previous
third floor office.
Debris left by workmen must
also be cleared out before normalcy
returns. In addition, telephones
and radiators have yet to be in-

graphs of meteoric irons prepared
by Stuart H. Perry, publisher of
the Adrian Telegraph at Adrian
were accepted and will be placed
in the rare book room at the Gen-
eral Library.
.The Regents also accepted a
gift to the Clements Library of a
collection of 90 manuscripts of
Anglo-American naval affairs,
made by Mrs. Hubert S. Smith of
Bay City. The papers represent
part of the library of her late hus-
band, in whose memory the gift
Th ord "Memorial" was offi-
cially removed from the name of
Maty Bartron Henderon Memorial
House by action of the Regents.
The houseo rat13ill St., is a
University alumnae.
Prepayment
(Continued from Page 1)
Dean of Women Deborah Bacon
said any student pressed for cash
could get a loan to make the pre-
payment "in ten minutes" from
the University. She added that a
student must be actually attend-
ing school when 'the applies-he'
can't get a loan during vacation.
Most other colleges already have
even stiffer deposit plans, the off i-
cials pointed out.
Dean Bacon said the new rule
applies to University operated co-
ops and that prepayment would
"probably be about the same'' at
league houses.
Chilrens Books
Dspla Sceduled
Ninety-two of the nation's out-
standing books for children pub-
lished etween 1937 and 1953 will
be on display through Jan. 23.
Touring the country under the
sponsorship of the Smithsonian
SInstitution, the books may be seen
in the Arch3itecture' Bldg.

Laurence H. Facrot of Hous-
ton, Texas, has given $10,000 as
the final payment of a gift to
the Development Council. The
'M' Club contributed $8,200 for
the 'M' Club Scholarship Fund..
Regent Dr. Charles S. Kennedy
of Detroit will be honored by one
of the gifts accepted at the De-
cember Regents' meeting. C. Al-
len Harlan of Birmingham has
Charles$ S. Kennedys Scoarshi
Fund. Details on how the fund
will be administered have not yet
been completed.
The Detroit Edison Company
has provided $5,000 to further the
work of the McMath Hulbert Ob-
servatory at Lake Angelus. The
Opthalmological Research Funid
received $4,500 from Earl W. Ben-
nett, of Midland.
*
PROF. Frederick P. Thieme of
the anthropology department will
set up a laboratory of physical an-
topology with the aid of~e a e4,0
Gren Foundation for Anthropo-
logical Researdh.
Another professor's project ben-
Council for Stream Improvemntl
grant. Prof. Clarence J. Velz of the
ho grn fo tream analyi re
search.
The grants amounting to $2,340
were accepted by the Regents for
the Oreon E. Scott Awards Fund.
One of $2,000 was from the Oreon
E. Scott Foundation of St. Louis
and $340 was from Orean E. and
R. C. Mahon Foundation of De-
troit.
The Regents accepted other gifts
and grants totaling $10,795.
U' Selected
To Give Award.
The Unmversity has been selected
to administer one of 20 new f our-
year scholarships made available
to colleges and universities by the
Lockheed leadership Fund of the
Lockheed Aircraft Corp.
Scholarships pay all tuition and
fees for four years, plus $500 a year
f or normal personal expenses. In
addition, $500 is granted each par-
Wfcipating school as a non-re-
.stricted gift for administrative
purposes.
Applicants for the University
award in engineering may con-
tact the office of the Director of
Admissions, 1524 Administration
Bldg.

IF, YOUR DAILY SUBSCRIPTION
EXPI RES T HIS SEM EST ER,
R EN EW IT NOW!

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FOR T HE SPR ING SE MESTE R
Call NO 23-24-1

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p.

C.

Fifield Wins
Prof. Russell H. Fifield of the
political science department was
awarded the George Louis Beer
Pze for his boo "ooo Wi-_
macy of the Shantung Question"
at the 68th annual meeting of the
American Historical Association.
Presiding at a session on "The
West European Nation-State in
the Age of Charles the Fifth" was
Prof. Palmer A. Throop. Twenty-
two members of the history de-
partment attended the meeting,
held Dec. 28 through 30 in Chi-
cago.
State Pastors Set
For Meeting Here
The 15th annual Michfgan pas-
tor's conference, sponsored ,joint-
ly by the Michigan Council of
Churches and the University ex-
tension service, will be held here
Jan. 18 to 20.
pastrs ofe adenominations reli-
gious 'leaders and persons inter-
ested in religious education.

UNG

F

sta

.lled

in the new quarters.

FARMERS
PRODUCE
MARKET
SALES FROM FARMER
DIRECTLY TO CONSUMER
DETROIT STREET
between Catherine & Kingsley
Open Every Wed. and Sat.
8 A.M. to 3 P.M.

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