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January 05, 1954 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-01-05

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JANUARY 5, 1954

I

£

'The Crary Plan
THE PROBLEM of the academic calendar
is like the traditional Gordian knot:
all attempts to unravel it appear to have
failed and the proposal to cut the knot and
institute an entirely different system has
raised a storm of controversy.
For some time the calendar has been
criticized. Not enough time to study for
finals, insufficient time in between se-
mesters, seniors graduated unofficially--
these are some of the problems that have
existed under past and present systems.
All attempted modifications have failed;
the last when there was no dead period
before finals was a complete fiasco.
This month the Deans Conference will
consider the Crary plan which provides for
a completely new calendar, thus attenipt-
ing to eliminate the failures of the old. If
the plan is adopted, the first semester will
begin at the end of August and close at
the end of December with a four-day break
for Thanksgiving. After nearly a six week
vacation the second semester would start at
the end of January and finals would be held'
at the beginning of May. As yet there has
been no decision as to how long spring va-
cation would be or even if there would be
one.
Under this plan, there would be ade-
quate time to study for finals, students
would be provided with a real break be-
tween semesters, and seniors 'would offi -
cially graduate at Commencement. But
the plan would involve other complica-
tions, not apparent at first glance.
The most glaring drawback is the deci-
sion to begin school In August. Granted
that with the semester ending in May, stu-
dents will have a head start for summer
jobs. But they will have to quit those jobs
in August and thus certain lucrative posi-
tions. will be closed. Jobs in summer re-
sorts, camps, and relief office work usually
require students to wor until Labor Day
--with school starting in August this will
obviously be impossible.
Another scheduling problem is encoun-
tered when one considers the long Chrsit-
mas vacation. Delightful though it may
be to consider six weeks with absolutely
nothing to do in contrast with the two
crowded weeks we have now, there is also
the fact that many students spend the
Christmas vacation catching up on their
reading and doing term papers. The new
plan would provide no break in which to
accomplish this.
Here, indeed, is the crux of the prob-
lem. Operating under the Crary plan,
students would have a semester which
would run sixteen weeks with only a few
days break. Such a rushed schedule would
put students under a tremendous strain.
This would hit especially those students
who work or who are engaged in campus
activities.
The Crary plan was introduced to allow
students sufficient time to study for finals
and yet insure the administration's wish
that seniors receive official diplomas at
Commencement. But although it has solved
this problem it has introduced others just
as serious, making the plan little better than
the existing system.
-Arlene Liss
ICURRENT MOVIES]
At the State,. .
HOW TO MARRY A MILLIONAIRE, with
Marilyn Monroe, Betty Grable and Lauren
Bacall
THIS PICTURE is solidly in line with the
American entertainment tradition that
finds the girl on the make for a rich hus-
band an irresistible object for spoofing.
Probably the ludicrous contrast of girlish

innocence and capitalistic shrewdness which
the gold-digger presents is what the pro-
ducers rely on as a sure-fire formula. In
How To Marry a Millionaire the formula is
a bit tired-and the-necessity for having to
create three different specimens of the type
very nearly exhausts the picture's limited
resources. Marilyn Monroe plays a dumb
gold-digger, Betty Grable an amateur one,
and Lauren Bacall a tough one.
Miss Bacall, as the really determined
member of the trio, is the one who con-
ceives the idea of going after millionaires
in their own stamping ground. She rents
a penthouse and instructs the other two
in stalking techniques. The contrasts in
the adventures of the three, as each ,of
them separately decides that fortune
hunting as a way of life has its short-
comings, is the stuff the movie is made of.
And it often is very flat, forced stuff in-
deed.
Miss Monroe is the most entertaining of
the three. She plays, surprisingly enough,
a kind of mousey girl whose personality is
all torn' up because she has to wear glasses.
Her romance with David Wayne (who con-
vinces her she looks ravishing in cheaters)
is the only affair in the picture that has
the lightness and originality of good comedy.
Miss Grable, traduced into playing the
kind of role Miss Monroe usually has, gives
an indifferent performance. And Miss Ba-
call I found completely unsympathetic, de-
spite her eleventh-hour change of heart.
Vulgarity and viciousness are her strong

MATTER OF FACT:
The State of the President--
A First-Year Resume

"1945 -

46 - 47 - 48 -49-- 50 -
51-52-53-"9

By STEWART ALSOP
W ASHINGTON-President Eisenhower, in
his Little White House in Georgia, has
been putting the finishing touches on his
State of the Union message. Meanwhile, as
he nears the end of his first year in office,
what is the state of the President?
According to those who have almost
daily contact with him, the state of the
President is good, and getting better all
the time. During Eisenhower's first
months in office, there were many re-
ports that he detested Washington and
his job. There was certainly some truth
in these stories-at least enough truth so
that friends and supporters became con-
vinced that he would under no circum-
stances run again.
He still takes no pleasure in the awful
isolation and terrible pressures of life in
the White House. "I am not going to be
mad at anyone today," he remarked on
Christmas Day, "I was so happy to get
away." The chances are that President
Eisenhower will never come to love the
Presidency as Franklin Roosevelt loved it-
or Harry Truman, after his first few humble
and awe-stricken months.
Eisenhower, according to those who know
him well, does not relax easily under the
weigth of tremendous responsibility. "He's
a natural worrier," one of his aides has re-
marked. His tendency to worry probably
had a good deal to do with the stomach
cramps which briefly troubled him in the
early autumn. But these cramps had no
organic origin at all, and it can be reported
on undoubted authority that the Presi-
dent's health is amazingly good. What is
more, he now worries far less than he once
did.
The reason is quite clear. Eisenhower is
now really getting on top of his job. The
country knows it, and he knows it, and both
are relieved.
All those who participated are agreed
that the President put on a downright
remarkable performance during the re-
cent conferences with his Congressional
leaders. He displayed charm, tact, force
and a surprising knowledge of the sub-
stance of issues which were completely
unfamiliar to him a few months back. He
also displayed great shrewdness in keep-
ing the headlines centered on himself,
despite the almost instinctive efforts of
the Capitol Hill politicians to grata them.
Those who work with him rate him a
first class administrator. It is significant
that he has now made the National Se-
curity Council the chief instrument of de-

cision on matters of vital importance. Un-
like Truman, who attended only occassion-
ly, Eisenhower takes the chair at almost
all Council meetings. The Council has thus
all but replaced the unwieldly cabine't re-
ducing the out-dated cabinet system to a
shadow.
* * *
THE PRESIDENT has certain very well-
marked ways of attacking his job. It
has often been rumored that he hates to
read, and will read nothing but Westerns.
It is true that he reads much less than Tru-
man (who, surprisingly, read a great deal-
he had a special fondness for long intelli-
gence reports). Confronted with the in-
evitable pile of papers on his desk, Eisen-
hower will turn to Sherman Adams or
another aide, and say "tell me what's in
them."
His aides have learned to be ready to
brief concisely and in detail-and to be
ready for searching questions. But they
have also learned to be ready to tell him,
where necessary, "Mr. President, this is
one you've got to read." When this hap-
pens, the President will cheerfully read
the paper in question.
He is, according to one of his aides, "a
quick, tight reader, with remarkable recall."
If a paper is presented to the National Se-
curity Council, and even a very slight change
has been made in the wording since the
President read it, Eisenhower will instantly
spot the change,
It has also lTpen rumored that the Presi-
dent has very 'little to do with his own
speeches-that he merely repeats what-
ever his aides give him. It is true that
once in a great while he will accept a
draft virtually unchanged. But far more
often, he will send back a draft prepared
by C. D. Jackson, Bryce Harlow, or anoth-
er White House ghost, covered with pen-
cilled interlineations, so that the speech
as finally delivered will be almost wholly
in his own words. "After all," one of his
aides has accurately remarked, "Ike used
to be a ghost himself."
All in all, it is still too early to say who
will win out in the inevitable struggles be-
tween the ..White House and Capitol Hill,
which lie ahead. But it is beginning to be
very clear that President Eisenhower is not
the amiable compromiser his critics once
thought him, and that he is by no means
prepared to see the power of the Presidency
whittled away during his tenure of office.
His enemies on both right and left may
find him a more formidable opponent than
they had counted on.
(Copyright 1954, New York Herald Tribune, Inc.)

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
University of Michigan
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
January 18 to January 28
For courses having both lectures and recitations, the time
of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitations only, the time of class is the time of
the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined at
special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
EDITOR'S NOTE-Officials have reported that extra
copies of this examination schedule will not be printed for
distribution.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that in case of a conflict the conflict
is arranged for by the class which conflicts with the regular
schedule.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.

Iq

IDAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN~

i

TIME OF CLASS

TIME OF EXAMINATION

(continued from Page 2)
ing of Circular Plates" at 3:45 p.m. on
wed., Jan. 6, in 101 West Engineering
Building. Refreshments will be served.
Seminar in Complex Variables will
meet Tues., Jan. 5, at 3:30 in 3011 An-
gell Hall, Mr. David A. Storvick will
speak on Asymptotic values of Mero-
morphic kunctions.
The Department of Aeronautical En-
gineering is sponsoring a seminar by

Episcopal Student Foundation. Teal
from 4 to 5:30 at Canterbury House.
All students invited.
S.R.A. Council meets at Lane Hall, 5:15
p.m.
Square and Folk Dancing. Instruc-
tion for beginners and new dances for
the experts. Everyone welcome. Lane
Hall, 7:30-10:00 p.m. '
Coming Events

MONDAY
TUESDAY

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2
3
4
8
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10
11
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Tuesday, January 26
Monday, January 18
Wednesday, January 20
Saturday, January 23
Monday, January 18
Monday, January 25
Thursday, January 28
Thursday, January 21
Monday, January 18
Wednesday, January 27
Tuesday, January 19
Friday, January 22
Monday, January 25
Thursday, January 28
Thursday, January 21
Saturday, January 23

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9
i

Dr. Robert C. F. Bartels, Mathematics American Association of Universityt
(Eng.), on "Surface Wave Phenomena" Professors. There will be a discussion
to be held on Tues., Jan. 5, at 4 p.m. of problems raised by current congres-
in 1504East Engineering BuildingAll sional investigations led by Professors
interested are cordially invited to at- Gardner Ackley, Robert C. Angell, Paul
tend. G.Kauper, and Edwin E. Moise, at 8
W n~, Sp.m., Thurs., Jan. 14, in the East Confer-
Women Studenits' Skating Classes will ence Room, Rpekham Building.
not meet at the Coliseum on Tues., Jan.
5, but will meet at the regular hours on A.S.P.A. Social Seminar. All students
Thursday. andfaculty and their friends are in-
Doctoral Examination for Priscilla vited to attend the social seminar of
JeanAlde, Pscholgy; hesi: "A the Michigan Chapter of ASPA on Jan.
Jean Alden, Psychology; thesis: ''An6 at 1:30 p.m., in the West Conference
Exploratory Study of Self-Rated Em- Room, Rackham Building. Dr. John A.
pathy," Tues., Jan. 5, 7611 Haven Hall, Perkins, President of the University of
at 1 p.m. Chairman, E. L. Kelly. Delaware and President of the Amerl-
can Society for Public Administration,
Caroctoral Examination or John J e will be the speaker of the evening.
Aspects of Alternate Methods of Fi- The Congregational-Disciples Guild
nancing Old-Age and Survivors Insur- DiscussionGroupat Guild House, Wed.;
~nce," Tues., Jan. 5, 105 Economics Jan. 6, 7 p.m.
Building, at 9 am. Chairman, R. A. }____

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

Psychology 31
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32
German 1, 2, 11, 31
Zoology 1
Botany 1, 2, 122
Chemistry 3
Sociology 51, 54, 60
Political Science 1
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54

Monday, January 18
Tuesday, January 19
Wednesday, January 20
Wednesday, January 20
Friday, January :22
Friday, January 22
Saturday, January 23
Tuesday, January 26
Tuesday, January 26
Wednesday, January 27

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.,r

ON THE
Washington Merry-Go-Round

with DREW PEARSON

4!
{ff)
1#

_ r
i- -
w i w

!.l

W ASHINGTON-Mr. John Q. Public will
be chiefly watching taxes, social se-
curity, national defense, and other head.
line issues as Congress gets under way.
Backstage, however, two of the most pow.
erful groups in the nation-the American
Legion and the American Medical Associa-
tion-are getting ready for a cutthroat bat-
tle against each other that will end up in
the halls of Congress.
The issue, in effect, is "socialized medi-
cine. "
The American Medical Association,
which ranks second among registered
Washington lobbies, spent $270,174 to in-
fluence Congress in 1952. The Legion,
which ranks eighth, spent $106,235. Both
are among the top lobbying spenders to
influence Congress.
But in this case the battle goes deeper
than Congress, with the A.M.A. encouraging
doctors to infiltrate the Legion as ordinary
veterans in order to fight the socialized-
medicine battle from the inside. The A.M.A.
has even set up a "front" group, the Nation-
al Medical VeteransbSociety, to fight the
socialized-medicine battle and warns its
members to confine their statements to
remarks "cleared through the A.M.A. to
make sure you all say the same thing."
The Legion in turn has alerted its 18,000
posts to start shooting at the A.M.A.
Bluntly, the American Legion magazine
warns: "the Legion has definitely lost pa-
tience with the American Medical Asso-
ciation's weaving, twisting, opportunistic
attacks on the federal system of care for
veterans.
"Never before," says the Legion, "had the
A.M.A. defined 'socialized medicine' in such
a way as to compel America's war veterans
to be for it."
NONSERVICE DISABILITIES
WHAT THE BATTLE boils down to is a
proposal by the doctors to ban free
hospital care by the government for non-
service-connected disabilities. In other
words, when a veteran gets sick for reasons
other than a disability suffered in war, he
would be denied treatment in a Veterans
Administration hospital.
Actually, this affects not merely the Am-
erican Legion but about 20,000,000 vets, or
An npr o.a ft r e +"u. lrti1m ne nonn1tinn of

them are not sold on
A.M.A."

the $25 dues to the

*9 **
PRESSURING CONGRESS
DR. JOSEPH D. McCarthy of Omaha, a
member of the A.M.A.'s committee of
legislation, gave the doctors a- peek at
A.M.A. lobbying tactics. He explained that
his legislative committee has a member as-
signed to each geographic division of the
United States to alert key men in those
states on "pressing legislative problems."
These key men, in turn, are responsible
for getting in touch with their Senators
and Representatives and "informing them
of the medical profession's attitude toward
proposed legislation." "This method," Dr.
McCarthy added, "has worked admirably
in the past."
Dr. William B. Walsh of Washington,
president of the A.M.A.'s "front" organi-
zation, the National Medical Veterans So-
ciety, cautioned doctors against declaring
open warfare on the Legion. "Education,"
he maintained, "is the cornerstone of the
campaign."
And as part of that education, he said,
"we must encourage physicians to join the
American Legion, but to avoid the creation
of doctor's posts. By remaining informal
(one of the boys), the doctors will be more
effective in an ordinary post."
Sentiment at the closed-door meeting was
far from unanimous, however, and several
doctors spoke up in disagreement.
Dr. William A. O'Brien of Nevada ask-
ed if the group thought it would be wise
for medical societies to tell the nation's
doctors not to care for nonservice-con-
nected cases not in V.A. hospitals.
Dr. Walter B. Martin, president-elect o
the A.M.A., warned that any such drastic
step would be a fatal error and the doctors
would "get our throats cut and get in the
doghouse permanently.",
One doctor, whose name was not identi-
fied in the minutes, asked his fellow doc-
tors what plans they had for treating the
87 per cent nonservice-connected cases.
"How," he queried, "could these patients
be placed in already overcrowded local
hospitals? How does it help the taxpayer
if the burden is simply shifted from the
federal to the local government?"

Musgrave.
Doctoral Examination for Hug-o Al-
fredotCabrera, Epidemiologic Science;
thesis: "Temperature Studies and Tem-
perature Adaptation of E. Histolytica
and the Effect of Adaptation of Viru-
lence," Tues., Jan. 5, 3012 School of
Public Health, at 2 p.m. Chairman, R.
J. Porter.
Doctoral Examniation for Elihu Geer,
Civil Engineering; thesis: "Stresses in
Very Deep Beams with Applications to
End Blocks of Prestressed Concrete
Beams," Tues., Jan. 5, 313 West Engi-
neering Building, at 4 p.m. Chairman,
L. C. Maugh.
Doctoral Examination for Alexander
Weir, Jr., Chemical Engineering; thesis:
"Two- and Three-Dimensional Flow of
Air through Square-Edged Sonic Ori-
fices," Wed., Jan. 6, 3201 East Engi-
neering Building, at 2 p.m. Chairman
J. L. York.
Doctoral Examination for Harry Ed-
ward Bailey, Aeronautical Engineering,
thesis: "Wing-Body Interference at
Supersonic Speeds." Wed., Jan. 6, 1077
East Engineering Building, at 2 p.m.
Chairman, A. M. Kuethe.
Doctoral Examination for Arthur Ner-
sasian, Chemistry; thesis: "A study of
Some Azo Nitriles," Wed. ,Jan. 6.h3003
Chemistry Building, at 2 p.m. Chair-
man, L. C. Anderson.
Doctoral Examination for Gilbert
Richard Horne, Business Administra-
tion; thesis: "The Receivership and Re-
organization of the Abitibi Power and
Paper Company, Limited," Wed., Jan.
6, 816 School of Business Administra-
tion, at 3:30 p.m. Chairman, W. A.
Paton.
Conce rt

Tartuffe; or, the Impostor, Moliere's
classic French comedy, will be present-
ed by the Department of Speech, at 8
p.m., in the Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre, Wednesday through Saturday, Jan.
13, 14, 15, and 16. Mail orders are bing
accepted now for $1.20, 90c and 60c. A
special student rate of any seat in the
house for 50c is in effect for the Wednes-
day and Thursday performances.
2nd Laboratory Bill of Plays, present-
ed by the Department of Speech, will
be presented in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre this Thursday and Friday, Jan.
7 and 8, at 8 p.m. Included on the bill
are G. B. Shaw's satiric-comedy, PRESS
CUTTINGS; Noel Coward's hilarious,
WAYS AND MEANS, from the famous
"Tonight at 8:30" series; and William
Butler Yeats' poetic dance-drama,
DEIRDRE. There is no admission charge,
and the seats are not reserved. The
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre will open at
7:30 p.m.
Final Speech Assembly for the fal
semester will be held at 4 p.m., Wed.,
Jan. 13. in the Rackhanm Lecture Audi-
torium. The guest speaker for this as-
sembly will be Russell McLauchlin,
Drama Editor for the Detroit News,
who will use "The Fabulous Invalid" as
his topic. The speech assembly is open
to the public with no admission
charge.
Roger Williams Guild. Yoke Fellow-
ship meets Thursday morning in the
Prayer Room at 7 a.m.
Roger Williams Guild. Tea and Chat,
Wednesday afternoon, 4:30 to 6:00,
Chess Club of U. of M. will meet
Wed., Jan. 6, 7:30 p.m., Michigan Union.
All chess players welcome.
Episcopal Student Foundation. Stu-
dent breakfast following 7 a.m. Epi-

Drawing 3
English 11
MIE 136
CE 23, 151
Drawing 2
EE 4, 5
EM 1, 2
PE 11, 13
CM 124
Drawing 1
MIE 135
CE 21, 22
Chemistry 3
PE 31, 32, 131
Economics 53, 54

Monday, January 18
Monday, January 18
Monday, January 18
Monday, January 18
Tuesday, January 19
Tuesday, January 19
Wednesday, January 20
Thursday, January 21
Thursday, January 21
Friday, January 22
Friday,'January 22
Saturday, January 23
Saturday, January 23
Tuesday, January 26'
Wednesday, January 27

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

. I

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M

phany Corporate Communion, Wed.,
Student Recital. William Doppmann, Jan. 6, at Canterbury House.
pianist, will be heard in a recital at
8:30 Wednesday evening, Jan. 6, in
Auditorium A in Angell Hall. A pupil
of Benning Dexter, Mr. Doppmann will
open the program with Kreisleriana, Op.
16, by Schumann. It will continue with/
Beethoven's Sonata in A-flat major, Op. r Ila I i
110, and Barber's Sonata, Op. 26. The

general public will be admitted with-
out charge.
u g .~ ___

Sixty-Fourth Year
Edited and managed by students 0f

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts be-
tween assigned examination periods must be reported for ad-
justment. See bulletin board outside Room 3044 East Engineer-
ing Building between January 4 and January 12 for instruction.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for
all applied music courses (individual instruction) elected for
credit in any unit of the University. For time and place of
examinations, see bulletin board in the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
______ -__ous subpoena and (2) cancella-
tion of the even more ominous
"inquisition" to be held by Rep.
/ette/4Cla rdy of Michigan in the near
R Ifuture.
TOeTH E ED ITOIt seems that on Dec. 11, Har-
old Mosher appeared before the
Subversive Activities C o n t r o 1
Board at a hearing on Justice De-
LYL... partment charges that the LYL
STo the Editor: is a Communist front. He testi-
fied that he joined the Commun-
0N NOV. 19, the House Com- ist Party in 1947 as an under-
mittee on Un-American Acti- cover agent for the F.B.I. in the
vities struck again. With a sharp New Haven youth branch.
subpoena to the Labor Youth Lea- Mr. Mosher stated that the LYL
oati nf Michian. it ordered not was set u vin May. 1949. after the

y

i X I U L -N 1 the University of Michigan undert
Museum of Art, Alumni Memorial authority of the Board in Control
Hall, Watercolors and Drawing by Ga- Student Publications.
varni, Jan. 2-24; Persian-Hindu Minia-
tures, Jan. 3-24. Open 9 to 5 on week- Editorial Staff
days, 2 to 5 on Sundays. The public is Harry Lunn..........Managing Edi
invited. Eric Vetter ................City Edi
--____ Virginia Voss......... Editorial Direct
t TodMike Wolff ........Associate City Edi
Even s . ® Qy AiceB. Silver. .Assoc. Editorial Direct
Science Research Club. The January Diane Decker. . .Associate Edit
meeting will be held in the Rackham Helene Simon.........Associate Edi
Amphitheater tonight at 7:30 p.m. Ivan Kaye..... ....Sports Edi
Program: "Electrical Methods in Or- Paul Greenberg....Assoc. Sports Edi
ganic and Biochemical Analysis," Philip Marilyn Campbell.......Women's Edi
J. Elving. "The World Health Organi- Kathy Zeisier....Assoc. Women's Edi
zation Pilot Project for Control of One Don Campbell.......Head Photograp
of Egypt's Most Devastating Diseases,"
Henry van der Schalie. Business Staff
The Congregational-Disciples Guild. Tomas Treeger A...Busine Mana
Tea at Guild House. 4:30-6:00 p.m. Harlean Hankin.... Assoc. Business M.
The Badminton Club will meet to- William Seiden........Finance Mana
night from 8 to 10 p.m. in Waterman Jamessharp.....CirculationMan
Gymnasium. Bring your own birds; the
rackets will be furnished. Anyone who Telephone NO 23-24-1

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