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December 17, 1953 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-12-17

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY DECEMBER, 17, 1953

II f

'PRURSI)AY, DECEMBER 17, 1953

$1,800 FOR THREE:
Abstention From Drink,
Cigarettes May Pay Off
m - ___

By WALLY EBERHARD
So you think you could stay
away from drinking alcoholic
beverages and smoking until you're
21-years-old for $1,800.
Three Colorado youngsters have
the chance to-put this question to
the test, according to an Associ-
ated -Press dispatch from Fort
Collins. The trio is to divide a $5,-
000 legacy when they reach their
Student Rise
Creates Many
'U' Problems
(Continued from Page 1)
Perhaps the dining rooms, a
separate one for each house, would
open into a central kitchen. Per-
haps two three-four wings off a
central area would be feasible.
This sort of arrangement
might capture some of the
friendlier spirit of the smaller
living group and help to serve
the original aim of the Michigan
House Plan, set forth 14 years
ago when the first dormitories
were built -- to provide more
than just a place to eat and
sleep.
And, Dean Rea says, even if ten
Helen Newberry Halls cost more
than one South Quad, "they're
worth more."
Added to the arguments against
building another South Quad, is
the. "panty raid" 'problem. The
large concentration of male popu-
lation in the South and West
Quadrangle area represents a po-
tentially explosive situation, Dean
Rea feels.
"ANYTHING THAT happens
draws a crowd of 300 to 400 stu-
dents," he explained. Besides, the
noise problem is serious in a big
dorm, especially with an echoing
courtyard. "There's just too much
traffic with 1200 students in .one
building, Dean Rea said.
But small dorms may cost
more money, and Dean Rea sees
evidence of financial tightness
in student budgets. He cites a
record number of applications
for loans, grants and employ-
ment. Ann Arbor Jobs are al-
ready scarce, and with a big
43 per cent enrollment bulge
seen in the next seven years,
the employment picture is not
bright.
That women at least would like
to live in smaller units was evi-
denced last year when 200 women
stood in line in the rain to apply
for a,. handful of vacancies in
Hobbs House.
On the other hand, small
dorms would have to be built
farther away from campus. And
many of the talking points of a
big modern unit like South
Quad might be missing in a
smaller building -- Club 600's,
darkrooms, ham radio stations
and other "frills" might have
to go.
"Of course we're anxious to
know what students think about
this," Dean Rea said. He cited
IHC's "Operation Inquiry" as a
good means of finding student
opinion on big versus small dormi-
tories.
Administration
Topic of Talk
Prof. Arthur MacMahon of Co-
lumbia University will speak on
"United States -Administration of
Foreign Affairs" at a University
political science roundtable at 7:45
p.m. today in Rackham Ampi-
theater.
The event is open to the public.

Students Offered
European Flight
University students and teach-
ers planning to travel overseas at
the end of May can participate in
the European Club of Ypsilanti's
special trip, secretary of the club
Mrs. Elfreda M. Crampton said
yesterday.
Mostly war brides, members of
the club are considering an airline
offer to supply a 63-passenger
plane at a round-trip rate of $300
per person, a discount of about
$300 from the regular fare.

majoi'ity'under conditions in the
will of their great-aunt who died
in October, if they stay away from
the weed and spirits till then.
* * *
A RANDOM sampling yesterday
of University smokers and occa-
sional drinkers produced varied
replies to the problem. One stu-
dent, Steve Qua, '54E, said he blew
$1,000 good-bye when he puffed
his first weed. Qua's agreement
called for him to stay away from
"coffin nails" until he was 25-
years-old, and was made while he
was 18.
Does he regret it? "Not partic-
ularly," says Qua. "Those kids
probably have a good chance
to make it," he said, "though it's
hard to hold out past 21."
A student quietly sipping suds at
a local drinking establishment
thought carefully before giving an
answer typical of many.
WELL, it's hard to answer un-
less you've actually had tle oppor-
tunity to take up such a gamble,
but I believe I could hold out if I
had it to do all over again."
Opposition sentiment was just
as strong. One coed promtply re-
plied, "No, it wouldn't be worth it
-besides $1,800 isn't much money
these days."
One consolation is in reserve for
the three Colorado youths since
if any of the three uses liquor or
tobacco, his or her share goes to
the Capper Foundation for Crip-
pled Children in Topeka, Kan.
lHedals Shown
'At 'U' Exhibit
The Archaeological Museum, al-
though it usually exhibits oddities
three or four thousand years old,
is now showing for an indefinite
period of time a new exhibit of
commemorative medals given toj
the University from other univers-
ities all over the world.
A medal issued at the celebra-!
tion of the bicentennial of the
first excavation at Pompeii in
1948 is one of the dozen awards.I
This large dark brown copper coin
was presented posthumously byR
the Italian government to FrancisR
W. Kelsey in recognition of hist
scholarly work at Pompeii.
The University of Glasgow com-
memorated its 500th anniversaryt
in 1951 by having a coin picturing
its founder, Pope Nicolas V. whicht
is included in the exhibit.t
Also on display is a silver sou-t
venir medal from the Universityt
of East Manila, and one from the
University of Paris.
1*

Shuttle
Tickets are still available for
the "Willow Hoppers," special
airline buses which will take air
passengers to Willow Run Air-
port
The buses will leave the Un-
ion tomorrow at 10:45 a.m.,
12:05 p.m. and hourly from 1:15
p.m. to 4:15 p.m. Coming into
Ann Arbor on Jan. 3 they will
leave Willow Run every half
'hour from 5:15 p.m., to 12:15
a.m.
Priced at $1 one way and
$1.50 round trip, tickets can be
bought from 1 to 5 p.m. today
at Window 7 in the Adminis-
tration Bldg.

TV To Show
'Alexander'
"Alexander Africander," a child-
ren's sketch, will close the year's
schedule of University television
features on WPAG-TV at 7:30
p.m. tomorrow.
Presented once before this se-
mester, "Alexander Africander"
was written by Ruth Mohr, a for-
mer graduate student here.
Also on the program will be
"Mr. Mistletoe," a new Christmas
story narrated by Mary Jane Gar-
butt, Grad.
University programs on the sta-
tion will resume on Feb. 1.

Greeks

Give

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i'll
STAILOIRs F URNISH ERS ~
BRITISH 1AfPOR TS
~~19 SSUT UNVERSTY AENU
VVm m m m m m m w

Pat
Fraternities,.
Open Houses
To ChildrenE
Thirty-eight fraternities were
stormed last Saturday afternoon
by 1,954 Ann Arbor elementary
school children from kindergarten
to the sixth grade at the annual
Interfraternity Christmas Party.
For the fraternity men and their
sorority aides, the supervision of
a planned program of entertain-.
ment proved to be a task in group
dynamics as the youngsters quick-
ly took control of the Greek man-
sions.
THE CHILDREN would have
been envied by the about-to-be-
initiated pledges, as they usurped
their gracious hosts' authority by
scurrying up and down stairs, wan-
dering in and out rooms, scruti-
scui-izing trophies and other objects
inthat raised their curiosity and
climbing tables and chairs to gain
a better view of the afternoon
activities.
However, out of all this seem-
ing chaos came an afternoon
long to be remembered by both
the youngsters and their hosts,
as they united to Play games,
sing traditional carols, consume
refreshments and distribute
gifts.
Highlight of each party was
the arrival of one of the five fra-
ternity Santa Clauses who cir-
culated among the houses passing
out small toys and bubble gum.
His entrance, though marked by
the inevitable tugging of his
beard, was enthusiastically re-
ceived by the young ones who rad-
iated good cheer and produced
many suggestions of "what I want
for Christmas."
* * *
PROBABLY the best demon-
stration of the noise-making abil-
ity of the children occurred when
a barrage of balloons was let loose
at each party, quickly followed by
cheers and a volley of blasts from
the bursting balloons.
Not to be outdone by the fra-
ternities, the men of West
Quad's Adams House entertain-
ed 31 children from the Sarah
Fisher Home in Farmington
Saturday.
In addition to watching movies,
trimming the tree from the shoul-
ders of their' foster fathers, sing-
ing carols, eating and claiming
gifts, the visitors toured the boys'
rooms and got a preview-look of
the "Holly Hop" decorations. Sev-
eral of the more sports-minded;
youngsters concluded the after-
noon by joining their older hosts
in a court football game.

r

HOPALONG CASSIDY'S APPEAL REACHES YOUNG AND OLD ALIKE

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*

Nothing like it to fill your
house with The Holiday Spirit...
"Christmas with

Arthur

C O D F R E Y ;...:":::_;:: "ym . ". ,
Sfavorlies on new st-se||in
C O LU M B I A R E C 0 R DA
Hear Arthur, Janette Davis, Haleloke, Rosa and Archie Bleyer and his Or-
_ Marion Marlowe, Frank Parker, the chestra in a complete selection of best
*Mariners, Lu Ann Simms, Julius La loved carols and Christmas songs :
White Christmas All on One
The First Nowell
" O Holy Night ColLYurnbia1
a itrnderlnd NL
" wa n Anger af Lp" Record
Jingle Bells
. Here Comes Santa Claus also on
~~ Am~Te ria s fv rieSooew bstsgn
MeleC rhi sSon Extended
Rudolph,The Red-Nosed Reindeer APR E4R D
SilHearArthu,HolaNttDvsHaeo, RsandAce Blay4dhinO d
Adeste Fideles F P ,e n p ls
Deck the Halls With Balls of Holly
It Came Upon The Midnight Clear Pick up yours now-
JOigleT thelee surprise7yu
Hark! The Herald Angels Sing tonight
Deck the $95 78.RPM
" SatCaup son' TidnihCla
*"Columbia , 1 Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. Marcos Registrada
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1

SPEED WITH SPUDS FRATERNITY PARTIES WERE NEVER LIKE THIS!

'I?
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I

* DAILY
PHOTO
FEATURE
Story by
DICK TRACKLER
and
DAl II1 A(')Aq

Chicago College of
OPTOMETRY
(Fully Accredited)
An outstanding college serving
a splendid profession.
Doctor of Optometry degree in
three years for students enter-
ing with sixty or more semester
credits in specified Liberal Arts

I!

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