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December 15, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-12-15

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1953

I I

t

MORE TIME FOR GARDENING:
Smith To Retire from Registrar Post

By GENE HARTWIG
To high school seniors enrolling
as freshmen the signature of Reg-
istrar Ira M..Smith is the signa-
tue of the University. -
Both a vegetable gardener and
bank director the 68-year-old own-
er of this autograph will end a
28-year career as University Reg-
istrar in July.
* * *,
COMING originally from south-
ern Indiana where he was born
and raised on a farm, the Regis-
trar finds greatest satisfaction in
his work and in introducing par-
ents and their children to the
realities of college life.
From 45 years experience in
admissions work he draws the
conclusion that "people are the
most interesting things in the
world."
He is as fond of talking about
the parsnip 50 inches long grown
in his garden in Urbana, Illinois
as he is about his pet project the
Principal - Freshman conference
which just had its 25th meeting
here this fall.
GRADUATED from high school
in Bloomington, Indiana in 1903,
kthe futu~re Registrar was a mem-
ber of the Pioneer track team and
helped found the Southern Indi-
ana Athletic Association which
has continued in existence to the
present.
One in a fanily of nine chil-
dren, two brothers and six sis-
ters, Smith recalls that every-
one had to work to keep things
going. The Smith farm near
Bloomington had been settled
in 1827 by the Registrar's grand-
parents and was one of the earl-
lest homesteads in the state.
Following a two year course in
the literary college and three
years in the law school at Indiana
University, Smith decided to take
a position at Illinois as assistant
to the registrar in 1909.-
* * *
FROM THAT DATE he begins
the list of eight University presi-
dents at Illinois, Chicago and
Michigan under whom he has
served.
In 1912 Smith, who had pre-
pared for a business law career,
set out for Chickasha, Oklahoma
with novelist Emerson Hough,
author of '54-40. or Fight" to
investigate a law practice open-
ing in the heart of the develop-
' In Oklahoma oil land.
Lack of funds determined the
decision to return to Illinois for
Smith and drew a curt letter from
Bough shortly after stating .sim-
ply, "Faint heart never won fair
lady,"
* * *
MOVING on to the University
of Chicago in 1920 the then As-
sistant Examiner Smith found em-
Panel To Talk
On Education
A new way of getting at the
old problem of attacks on modern
education will be tried out at 3-
p.m. today when an audience re-
commends changes in schools and
a panel discusses these recommen-
dations in Auditorium B, Angell
Hall.
Over the past several years,
there have been attacks on mod-
ern education both valid and in-
valid. The audience at this panel
discussion will form small groups
faced with the question, "What
one change would you recommend
in the school and colleges?" The
answers will be presented to five
professors who will then speak on
these questions.
The panel, "Chaos or Coopera-
tion-the Liberal Arts and Mod-

ern Educational Practices," is com-
posed of Prof. Claude Eggertsen,
education school; Prof. Henry V.
Ogden, English department; Prof.
Warren A. Ketcham, education
school; Prof. Robert M. Thrall,
mathematics . department; and
Prof. John E. Milholland, psychol-
ogy department.
Six Councilmen
Up for Re-election
Six of the Ann Arbor City Coun-
cil's seven members whose terms
expire next April 5 are planning
to run for re-election.
Candidates on the spring ballot
will be C. J. Tremmel, Russell J.
Burns, Wendell B. Forsythe,
Thomas S. Colvin, A. D. Moore
and Arthur W. Gallup. Gene D.
Maybee will not run.
All candidates for another term
are Republicans.

'U' Students
To-Be A ided
ByHoppers
The Willow Hoppers, special
airline buses, will take vacation-
bound airline passengers from
Ann Arbor to Willow Run Airport
Friday, and back to the city again
at the end of the Christmas recess.
Buses will be leaving from the
Union at 10:45 a.m. and hourly
from 12:15 to 5:15 p.m. Friday.
For students and University
personnel returning to Ann Arbor
via the airways at the end of va-
cation, - Larry Wilk, '54, special
trips chairman of the Wolverine
Club, promises faster service than
has previously been available.
Tickets for the Wolverine Club
sponsored buses, ivhich are priced
at $1.50 round trip and $1 one
way, will be on sale from 1 to 5
p.m. today, tomorrow and Thurs-
day at window 7 in the Adminis-
tration Bldg.
Panel Will Discuss
Law Opportunities
A panel discussion on oppor-
tunities in law practice today will
be held at 7:30 p.m. today in Rm.
120 Hutchins Hall.
Presented by the Student Bar-
Association, the panel will consist
of four University graduates who
will each represent one of the
four fields most often entered by
lawyers. Types of practice con-
sidered will be government service,
corporation law, practice in a
large city and that of the general
practitioner who is operating in-
dependently.

NBC.SERIES:
'College Qtiz Bowl' Broadcast
To Be Recorded Here Today
Four students representing the
cast. Although the shows are gen-
Umiversity, will match wits with erally "live," this particular show
four representatives of Brown will be transcribed today for:
University and Pembroke College broadcast Jan. 2 and is being donej
at 8 p.m. today on "College Bowl because of the Christmas vaca-1

Senior Board
The Senior Board will meet
at 9 p.m. today in the Rumpus
Room of the League.
Letters to senior parents to
get their reactions to proposed
changes in the exam schedule,
which would determine wheth-
er commepcement is official or
tentative, will be discussed.

comiics

DiscuSSed
Speaking on "Economic Develop-
ment" to the African Union Sun-
day, Prof. Kenneth E. Boulding of
the economics department cited
building up an accumulation of
goods as one of the two major
problems standing in the way of
Africa's economic progress

E.

Quiz," a nationwide NBC radio tion.
series, FIVE STUDENTS, one of whom
The two teams gwill answer will act as an alternate, have been
questions from their respective picked by a faculty committee to
campuses posed by a moderator in compete on the show. They in-

Crosses Mark
Traffic Deaths

1 . Nw York wuith nec~.ial ewok1

hookups required for the broad-
IVROTC Flying
Class To Start
Beginning tomorrow, the Navy
ROTC will conduct a series of one-
hour flights to acquaint naval ca-!
dets with flying and to interest
them in naval aviation careers.
Five flights are scheduled daily
for Wednesday, 'Thursday, and
Friday of every school week until
all cadets interested in the pro-
gram have been included. If there
is enough interest, the flights will
be continued further.
Four cadets will go on each
flight with each cadet spending
15 minutes in the co-pilots chair.
Slated for air reconoiter on the
flights are Ann Arbor, Detroit,
and the naval air station at Grosse
Isle.
The plane that will be used is
a Beechcraft from the Grosse Isle
base. The pilots will be three mem-
bers of the NROTC staff and three
navy lieutenants doing graduate
work in the University.
C1I

elude Thomas Dell, '54, member "Operation Highway Cross"
of Phi Beta Kappa; Anne Steven-- planned by the Ann Arbor Junior Tracing the history of economic
son, '54, associate editor of Gen- Chamber of Commerce will place development, Prof. Boulding said
eration; Harry Lunn, Jr., '54, white crosses along main high- that becoming economically ad-
Daily managing editor; Virginia ways in Washtenaw County to re- vanced required an accumulation
Voss, '54, Daily editorial director mind motorists of the county's in- of goods so that the people will
and Ronald Witt, '54, Phi Beta creasing traffic factality rate. be able to produce more than they
Kappa member. One cross will be put, up for consume. This problem and the
each death, the organization has ever-increasing rift in ideas be-
Each week the winning school announced. tween the generations are the
receives an award of $500 for a; Otis Hardy, chairman of the main stumbling blocks in Africa's
campus fund of its choice. This project, said the crosses will be development.
team then returns to the show three feet high and have the date
the following week to compete. the fetahig a k de The newly-formed African Un-
If the University team wins, it of the fatality in black numerals, ion was founded with the purpose
will participate again in thej Traffic deaths for the past three of bringing Africa and its culture
Jan. 9 broadcast. years will be included. Washtinaw closer to the people of the United
County has had 53 highway deaths States. The organization and its
The recording session will take in 1953 as compared to 34 last meetings are open to all students.
place in Auditorium A, Angell year.
Hall. It is open to the public and This year's record is only two
all interested students or faculty short of the statistics for 1941,
members are urged to attend. considered the worst year.

Y
f.

r
f.

A

-Daily-Don Campbell
REGISTRAR IRA M. SMITH WILL COMPLETE 28 YEARS
WITH THE UNIVERSITY IN JULY WHEN HE GOES ON
RETIREMENT FURLOUGH.

- -

ployed in his office a college stu-
dent named Fanni Kaufmann.
Later when Smith had been
summoned to take over the Regis-
trar's." post here Miss Kaufmann
joined him and has remained as
his secretary ever since.
Prior to Smith's arrival at the
University in 1925 admissions
were handled "separately by the
deans of each school.
Smith describes how the pro-
cess of centralizing admissions and
the records of the schools of the
University was carried out until
now all.but the law, medical, busi-
ness administration and engineer-
ing schools have deposited their
records with the Registrar's of-
fice.
* * *
ACTIVITY of all kinds has been
characteristic of the Registrar's
life and he is in more than a

,

t

dozen groups as president or mem-
ber.

He is past president of the
Ann Arbor Rotary Club and the
Ann Arbor Chamber of Com-
merce and is presently vice-
president and chairman of the
board of a city savings and loan
association.
To his neighbors in Geddesj
Heights Smith is known for his
annual vegetable gardens. He
calls them real vegetable gardens
complete with 30 different kinds
of vegetables - everything from
brussel sprouts to tomatoes to red
raspberries on the plot the size of
a full city lot.
With regard to plans for the,
futl.re the Registrar has made no
definite announcement, however,
young people and college will
probably figure largely into the
picture.

rr

-M

- I

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What's New at Provident?
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2. Continued issuance of policies with N'o War Clause
(even if you are in service or expect to enter service).
3.A special low cost College Savings and Protection Plan.

If you are undecided what to do after
college, ask your placement bureau
about the many advantages that a sell-
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young graduate earn so much money,
earn it so quickly and without special-
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Business leaders throughout Amer-
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Frequently no experience is necessary
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graduates in virtually every type of
American business. If you would like
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and the opportunities they offer, fill
out this coupon and turn it in as
directed. The business office of this
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welcome from men of all classes.
As advertising representatives of
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we are in frequent contact with lead-
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By FREDDI LOEWENBERGt
Is defamation by radio libel or
slander?
Can a "rain maker" be sued if he
drops water on the wrong person's
land?
* * *
MEMBERS of the University
law school's Legislative Research
Center spend their time studying
the legal aspects of such problems,
publishing their findings yearly
in a volume entitled 'Current
Trends.' Dealing mainly with pri-
vatelaw, the Center has also done
service work for various govern-
ment agencies on questions such
as atomic energy and taxes.
The only group of its kind in
the country, the Legislative Re-
search Center got its start in
1949 when Prof. Samuel D. Es-
tep and Prof. L. Hart Wright of
the law school were sent to find
out what service agencies were
doing in the field of legislation.
Preparation for the Current
Trends volume begins with certain
state statutes being designated for
study. To be chosen, the idea in a
statute must be a current trend
and of some national significance.
It must have been adopted recent-
ly, but may be either a new idea
or only apply an old solution to a
new problem.
AN ANALYSIS of the question is
made, 'With both previous ways of
handling similar problems and
other state laws being considered.
The results are then published in
monograph form.
Released every year if pos-

sible, the next issue is sched-
uled to come out this spring. A
staff of six full-time researchers
with Prof. Estep as head is em-
ployed, with student help also
used in making surveys. Financ-
ing is done jointly by the W. W.
Cook Legal Research Endow-
ment Fund and the University
budget.
Problems investigated are in the
'field of law dealing with the re-
lationship between individuals. It
is the area of private law that
gets the least attention from leg-
islatures ' and legislative research:
agencies, Prof. Estep explained.
There are numerous manufactur-
ing and government agencies who
will investigate other types, he
pointed out.
The legal background for legis-
lation in the field of atomic energy
was recently considered at the re-
quest of the American Bar Associ-
ation's Special Committee . on
Atomic Energy. The governor and
state legislatures have also sent
frequent requests for memoranda
on special questions. Research
done here often forms the basis
for laws, Estep said.
For HAIR STYLES
THAT PLEASE I
and comfort toned
atmosphere
try
71 N( . Univesi
715 N. University
g

607 Shelby Street
Detroit 26, Mich.
WO 2-6011

227 Municipal Court Bldg.
Ann Arbor, Mich.
NO 3-4151

s

College Address:___________________________ I
Class of: Standing in.Class: Major:
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