100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 22, 1953 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I rAGE LPGnTEEN

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPTEhIBER 22, 1952

PAE:GTE TEDY ETEBR-,~5

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Stoddard Out at Illinois;
Harvard* Paper Silenced

Lecture Series Stars

A few storms broke the tradi-
tional quiet on the nation's cam-
puses over the past three months
resulting in the removal of a Big
Ten university president and the
silencing of an Eastern school's
summer paper.
President of the University of
Illinois George Stoddard resigned
his post late in July after an argu-
ment with the university's board
of trustees over brebiozen, a can-
cerdrug being tested at the uni-
versity.
IN 1951 THE American Medical
Association investigated the drug
and issued a denial of its curative
powers. Experiments with the drug
continued, however, under the di-
Choral Union
Will Audition
New Students
Students interested in joining
the University Choral Union may
make appointments for auditions
on or before Thursday at the office
of the University Musical Society,
Burton Tower, or by calling 7513.
The Choral Union is made up of
more than. 300 singers. Each fall
the group is reorganized and new
students are invited to audition
for membership to "fill vacancies.
Former members in good standing
are automatically readmitted upon
advance application.
Rehearsals are held from 7 to
8:30 p.m. every Tuesday in Audi-
torium A, Angell Hall. Extra .re-
hearsals are held occasionally just
prior to performances.
Each year the group gives two
performances of Handel's Mes-
siah at the opening of the Christ-
mas season and also takes part in
two of the May Festival concerts
with the Philadelphia Orchestra.

rection of' the vice-president In
charge of professional schools.
Last year President Stoddard
ordered the experiments stopped
and recommended to the board
of trustees that the vice-presi-
dent post be abolished.
But the trustees moved in a
different direction at their July
meeting and gave President Stod-
dard a 6-3 no-confidence vote.
The move was initiated by
trustee Red Grange, the "Gallop-
ing Ghost" of Illinois football in
the 1920's.
* 4* *
HARVARD University's summer
school administration removed
the right to editorialize from the
summer Crimson after the news-
paper published an editorial in
July criticizing the Eisenhower ad-
ministration.
According to the university,
the summer Crimson was par-
tially subsidized by the school
and should not have published
political opinions.
The newspaper, independent of
the college financially during the
regular school year, will resume
publication this fall.
* * * -
A TWENTY-SEVEN year old
student driving ban at the Univer-
sity of Illinois was removed Sep-
tember 1 on a one-year trial basis.
Formerly, seniors, and students
over 21 could obtain car permits.
Now, most undergraduates at Il-
linois will be able to request per-
mission to drive.
A university official estimated
that the lifting of the ban would
mean 500 additional cars on the
Champaign campus.
Acting president of the Uni-
versity of Illinois is Lloyd Morey,
formerly chief business officer
for the school.
Stoddard has taken up tempor-
ary residence in Princeton, N.J.
and plans to devote his time to
writing.

TO SPEAK HERE-Among the featured attractions in this season's Oratorical Association's Lecture
Series are left to right: Chester A. Bowles, Anne Baxter and Tyrone Power. Bowles will appear
on Oct. 15 while Miss Baxter and Power will appear with Raymond Massey on Oct. 30. Other
attractions are Trygve Lie, Nov. 11; Hanson Baldwin, Feb. 9; Mrs. Alan G. Kirk, Feb. 18; Herbert
Brownell, Jr., March 2; and Agnes Moorehead and Robert Gist, March 24.
StudentExchangeA4with Berlin Opens

SL Driving
Motion Still
UnderStudy
No action was taken on the
Student Legislature driving ban
resolution during the summer va-
cation while the Board of Regents
continued to study the proposal
allowing students except freshmen
to operate automobiles on campus.
According to Karl D. Strieff, as-
sistant to the dean of students, no
word has been heard of any ac-
tion either favorable or unfavor-
able on the proposal by the Re-
gents..
THE MOTION, originally passed
by the Student Legislature late last
semester, provided that all Uni-
versity students be allowed to op-
erate cars on campus except fresh-
men under 21 years of age.
Only restrictions placed on
upperclassmen driving would be
the usual proper vehicle regis-
tration, insurance coverage, par-
ental consent for minors and
identification markings on the
car.
Disciplinary action for violators
was suggested in-the form of fines,
loss of driving privileges and sus-
pension from the University.
Strieff also explained the tight-
ening of the two hour parking
limit within the campus area this
year is due to the construction of
the city's new parking structure
on Maynard St.
The restrictions were put into
force to discourage all-day park-
ing which tied up parking space
in the congested business area.

"The World Youth Wants," a
United States Assembly of Youth
conference decided this month, is
a world without narrow prejudice
or undue restriction of basic free-
doms and one which would pro-
vide certain minimum standards
of living and more equal opportu-
nity for all people.
Nearly 300 white collar workers,
students and factory workers at-
tending the UIAY conference met
on campus from Sept. 3 through
8 to discuss and plan the world
youth wants.
FIRST MAJOR address of the
conference was given by Walter
Reuther, president of the Congress
of Industrial Organizations and
United Auto Workers, who called
for American leadership of a
strong peace offensive by provid-
ing a high standard of living for
western bloc countries.
Prof. Preston W. Slosson of
the history department spoke in
favor of closer federation of the
free wvestern powers as a prepar-
atory step toward world govern-
ment.
Other featured USAY speakers
included Prof. Henry Steele Coin-
mager of Columbia University's
history department and President
Mordescai W. Johnson of Howard
University, Washington, D.C.
. *
SPONSORED BY the Young
Adult Council, a federation of
more than 20 organizations repre-
senting youth groups throughout
the country, the meeting was the

USAY Holds First U.S.
Convention on Campus



first USAY convention held in the
United States.
YAC is affiliated with the
international organization hich
World Assembly of Youth,
an international organization
which works to promote ideas of
youth in all areas of the world.
In order to discuss adequately
specific areas of society, USAY
was divided into three major com-
missions-American Heritage, Hu-
man Rights and the United States'
Position in the World Today,
Commissions, in turn, were sep-
arated into smaller groups which
gave attention to means of secur-
ing and maintaining good gov-
ernment, adequate educational fa-
cilities, individual liberties, aca-
demic freedom and aid to under-
developed areas of the world.
YAC aims in the future to spon-
sor USAY conferences annually in
order to promote and publicize the
aims of American youth.
Glee Club Starts
TryoutProgram
Tryouts for the Women's Glee
Club will be held at 4 p.m. today
and Thursday in Auditorium "D",
Angell Hall.
Composed of 40 voices, the group
presents concerts on campus as
well as an annual tour. The Glee
Club is directed by Maynard Klein.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

i,{
'l

k

Student Legislature's first stu-
dent-cultural exchange program
with the Free University of Ber-
lin begins this year with the trade
of two students between Berlin
and Ann Arbor.
William Alan, '54, who will
study at the Free University, sailed
for Germany Saturday. Alan was
selected during the summer to ie-
place Donald Messersmith, Grad.,
who originally planned to attend
the West-Zone University, but was
unable to go because of the draft.
Bernhd Rissmann is the Free

University student selected td
study at the University for the
current academic year under an
SL scholarship.
IN ADDITION to the exchange
of students, SL sent $191 for a
scholarship which would enable
a refugee from the East German
Zone to study at the Free Univer-
sity. One hundred sixty-five dol-
lars was donated by SL to enlarge
the library of the German school.
.SL also sent $219 to buy food
packages for Berlin students,
many of whom are undernour-

fished refugees from the Com-
munist-controlled zone of Ger-
many.
The Office of Student Affairs
and SL will each pay half the cost
of a year's tuition for the German
student, who will receive an ad-
ditional $112 from SL for spend-
ing money. Rissmann will live at
the local Pi Lambda Phi frateni-
ty chapter for the school year.
Funds enabling SL to establish
the student - cultural exchange
program were netted during the
spring in a campus-wide fund
drive.

ii, .1

Our

Shelve

sum s ca -er---------- ^ v rmv v v vm~ -m-- m

are
and

stocked

with

I *
PRIN
KING SIZE
'a
4'
'R Card- tooa
Iro ,Push E
IA
LOWER.
Downtown-
;h
4'
4,
4'
QUAIT
4'o
4'n
4'
? 4,3

TIN(
E SERVICE
Catalog b
Button
PRICE
307 N. Main
PRINTING

r'
1
41
IT 44
44
at
A
h3
9. AAA 13

I

us

D

+ii

II_ _ ; amaa..msw.msa w.sns.x. yes aa_ _.®aws a. ss a. s a{.a:ll
s
a~
..-
... .
a: / 1
""0r.
' w a °
t f F
3 ' ..
J . ' / x
i y' /t
ti, :
'
,
.
' J1' ,°

for Every Course in Every Department
ENGNEERS--MEDICS--LAWYERS
Consult our New and Enlarged Professional Department for your Requirements.
Make use of our years of experience in bookselling to ensure
yourself of the Best Buy in Town.

r.

1'

STUDE
of

T

SUPPLIES
KINDS

ALL-

6~ .

E I

i A

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan