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December 13, 1953 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-12-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TRER

WASHTENAW CROSSING:
Wetteruall Watehes Over Youngsters

Problems

2000 Miles Away

By MURRY FRYMER
Santa Claus comes only once a
year, but some men like Fred Wet-
terhall play the part the year
round.j

Fred, or more formally, C. F.
Wetterhall, is the patrolman at
the busy Washtenaw and South
University crossing. He says he's
69, but adds that he doesn't feel or
act it.
"I can still smack a golf ball
with the best of them," he boasts,
"and the men I play with are all
younger.'"
TO THE CHILDREN from An-
gel school that he helps cross with
the light three times a day, he's
"Fred" and he knows them all by
name, too. The little boys get
a friendly tap in the back as they
greet him, while the girls some-
times want a hug and get it.
"They're a wonderful bunch,"
I Fred beams like a father. "Why,
there's one little fella, comes
everyday in a pair of riding
breeches. He's always got a
smile on his face, as sweet as
can be."0
Fred took the patrolman's job
three years ago after retiring from
a travelling salesman's position.
** *
HIS TWO children, Roy, now
47 years old, and Mrs. Ruth Re-
mius, 38 years old, are both Uni-
versity graduates. Roy earned
degrees in Business Administra-
tion. and Law here and is now a
tax lawyer for a firm in Milwau-
kee.
"After I retired, I had to have
something to do," Fred recount-
ed. "I can't just sit around, so I
took this job. Anyway, I love
the kiddies."
Fred has his own system work-
ed out for teaching the children
safety habits.
"I let them help me across. They
take my hand and I tell them,
'watch the light and take me
across.' It doesn't help when Uni-
versity students cross against the
light though. It sets a bad exam-
ple."
* * *
FRED KNOWS all the habits of

Confronting M
Santas Told~
By RONA FRIEDMAN
"People want to believe," said
Rha Arnold, who works part time
as Santa Claus in one of the local
department stores.
"The trouble is," Arnold con-
tinued. "that parents destroy the
myth of Santa Claus for their
children but fail to replace it
with any other belief, not bother-
ing to tell them of the real mean-
ing of Christmas.""
* **
"I CAN always tell," he said, "if
a child believes or not. Those that
do look' me straight in the eye,
sometimes even trembling from
excitement, while those that don't
try to see where the whiskers end
and the beard begins."
"First I ask the children what
they want for Christmas and
some even bring long lists which
I go over with them to eliminate
what I can. Then I ask them if
they have been good. Before I
promise them a gift I always ask
the parents if the child deserves
it. This is my way of finding
out if it is possible for them to SCHON STUDIES WHILE MAR
give the gift to the child," he
added.
Arnold claims that most of thelM a iage iTa
boys this year are asking for all
types of cowboy suits including a
two-gun holster and sometimes!W hile Gfooni
even a horse. "Surprisingly, even

-Daily-Dean Morton
'FRED' TAKES THE CHILDREN ACROSS
the children in crossing and tries couple of days," he said. "Those

-Daily-Don Campbell
RRIAGE TAKES PLACE
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Studies

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to correct the bad ones.
"Now take this little guy," he
pointed out as a youngster came
to the opposite curb. "He al-
ways jumps the gun." And just
then the light turned green and
the boy came racing by to the
call "watch it Billy," from the

lady drivers . .

FRED THINKS his hardest,
difficulty in compromising the
fights the young fellows get into.-
"I wouldn't give a darn for a
"youngster without a temper,
though," he added.

patrolman.
patroman.I Fred now lives on Walnut Ave.
Fred's duty is not only restrict- with his vies an oatsd of hi
ed to helping the youngsters cross job h lie to hutsde fih
thejob he likes to hunt and fish
"m sthe information bureau," "I guess I'll keep this job till I
"I' th inormtio get fired. I like the young people.
he laughs. "Cars going south down Makes me feel younger myself,"
Washtenaw stop and ask me, 's he uded.r
this the road to Lansing?' I say cn
'this is the right road but you'r1
going the wrong way.'
Just then a car raced through tP
the intersection after the light
had turned red. Fred took out O H l a t-
his little notebook and enteredI
the license number.
"She'll get a nice letter in a Three language clubs, French,
German and Spanish, will give a

some of the girls are requesting! 4
coyvgirl suits also with holsters By LEE MARKS the dense tropical jungles of Ven-
but the top item on their lists is While his marriage was taking ezuela and Brazil. On one of these
dolls," he said, place more than 2000 miles away expeditions a group of Indians, an-
** in Venezuela, Miguel Schon, '56,
WHEN I receive unreasonable was calmly studying for a bluebook yed because they felt the ex-
"WhEN Iwpeditionywasuviolatingrtheirusacre
requests," he continued, "I try to in his room at Allen-Rumsey house. groundsi tinaptheirec
reason logically with the child and Because Schon could not go to tgrounds tied to kinap thoe direc-
it usually works. If a small child Venezuela for the ceremony, and Schon said, "are very short in sta-
asks for an expensive gift such his bride, whom he will meet in t
as a locomotive which the parents New York during the Christmas six feet tall. We explained our pur-
could not afford, I tell him there holidays, was not permitted to'poses, gave them some trinkets
is a limited supply of locomotives come to the United States unless and beads and the expedition was
this year and that first preference married, the marriage was per- allowed to continue.
should go to the older children.'' formed by proxy. f r

MAKE FOLLETT'S
YOUR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING
HEADQUARTERS

Christmas party at 7:30 p.m. to-
morrow in the Michigan room of
the League.
The French club will feature;
Lillemor Aronsson who will pre-
sent 'a dialogue in French, the!
German club will dramatize "The;
Night Before Christmas" and the'
Spanish club will entertain with
posadas and a pignata.
To complete the festivities,
which are open totthe public, re-
freshments will be served and
Christmas carols of each country
represented will be sung.a
t s n

Arnold recalled one little boy,
who wanted a saddle because he
knew of a horse he could ride
if he had it. The parents were
rather relieved when Arnold
convinced the boy that the
saddle was impractical.
When children tell me they saw
Santa Claus in Detroit last week
*and ask how I could also be Santa
Claus, I tell them that I am the
spirit of Santa Claus for he is
very busy and has many helpers."
Arnold feels there is a- definite
psychology to being a Santa Claus
and that there are definite tricks
to the trade such as over-hearing
conversation in which the child's
name is mentioned or noticing it
on a pin or bracelet, thus keep-
ing a step ahead of the child which
is always important, he empha-
sized.

DURING the unique ceremony,I
in which a Venezuelan friend act-
ed the role of groom, Schon, a 23-
year-old anthropology major, pur-
sued his studies in routine fashion.
Schon explained, "I nominat-
ed a friend to act for me dur-
ing the marriage rites. Ile goes
through the motions of being
a groom, and signs the certifi-
cate." Asked if it would be pos-
sible for the friend to double-
cross him and sign the wrong
name to the certificate, Schon
replied, "No, he's too good a
friend and besides the authori-
ties have a signed statement that
he is acting only as my repre-
sentative."
Schon's first official notification
that the civil ceremony, performed
last Thursday, had been consum-
mated arrived the next morning by
telegram. The second half of the
marriage rites was performed last

in anthropology when he joined
the Society of Natural Sciences
at the age of 17. It was through
the Society of Natural Sciences
that Schon made his jungle trips.
On one such trip, they were ac-
companied by King Leopold of
Belgium who, "acted just like any
other member of the expedition,
and expected no special favors,"
he added.
Although the majority of the
primitive tribes encountered by the
anthropologists were f r ien dly,
Schon said, the group was careful
to avoid certain very dangerous
Indians. "They are essentially war-
riors and are deadly with the bow
and arrow. Some of the Orinoco
tribesreven use curare (a deadly
poison) on the tips of their ar-
rows," he noted
Commenting on the dangers of
the jungle, Schon said the worst
things he had ever encountered
were the clouds of mosquitos. "Al-

Books

Toys

Christmas Cards
Wrappings
Stationery

Games
Records
Children s
Books

Saturday in the church. though the jungle is-full of dan-
* * * gerous animals and insects, they
A NATIVE of Caracas, Schon shy from human beings," he claim-
has made several expeditions into ed.

It's WILKINSON'S
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