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December 12, 1953 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-12-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ZAr VoT7y

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 195?

i I I

MUSIC AND DRAMA:
Norton Describes Europe
By PAT ROELOFS
A three-and-a-half month Eu-
ropean tour made an intense im-
pression on Prof. Hugh Z. Nor-
ton of the speech department.
The trip included visits to mu-
sic and drama festivals in Milan,
Verona and Rome in Italy, Munich
in Germany and Salzburg in Aus-
tria.
* * * MA,

WHILE in Europe, Prof. Norton
and his, wife made their head-
quarters in Paris. Frequent visits
to the theater, including the Co-
medie Francaise with its classic
productions and modern theaters,
were an important part of their
visit. The writing of some of the
French dramatists he describes as.
"brilliant," including in this cate-
gory the works of Giradoux and
Sartre.
Contemporary French drama
reflects problems of the French,
a. terribly disillusioned people,
according to Prof. Norton. The
results of two world wars fought
within her borders has made a
bitter France, he observed, and
the artists of today are trying
to reflect the tragic feeling in
their work.
Although the European visit
was the first for the~Nortons, vis-
its to "out of the way islands in
the Caribbeans" and Mexico have
been a regular part of their lives.
* * *
WHEN at work at the Univers-
ity, Prof. Norton does more than
teach courses in theater. One of
his most enjoyable duties is serv-
ing for more than six hours each
week as a counselor for fresh-
men and sophomores. "It is by
learning tb understand' the prob-
lems that I can become a better
teacher, and by teaching that I
can be of better help to the stu-
dents" he analyzed.
Work on committees for can-
didates for doctoral degrees is
another task which requires

Botanists
To Sponsor
Open House
Green-thumbed Botany 2 stu-
dents will display the results of
this semester's gardening at a hol-
iday-decorated Botanical Gardens;
Open House from 1 to 5 p.m. to-
morrow.'
Taught by Prof. Elizabeth Clo-°
ver of the botany department, the
course is' based on principles of
plant growth, propagation, graft-
ing, and the preavention of disease.
Students get practical experience
in all these fields through their
individual projects.
Providing extensive facilities
for the growth of plants, the
Gardens serve as the Botany 2
laboratory. Students travel there
twice a week to check on the
progress of plants, which range
from violets for their rooms to
mushrooms and other fungi.
Plants which will be featured at
the display tomorrow include cit-
rus fruits, water-lilies, dodder (a
parasitic, colorless plant) and
papaya and other tropical growths.

(Continued from Page 1)
sued bonds at the lowest interest
rates it could.
AS INTEREST rates throughout'
the country fell during the 1930's
and 1940's, the bonds were "re-
funded." They were bought back
from their holders, and new bonds
were issued at a lower interest
rate.
How complicated the set-up is
can be seen from the compara-
tively simple case of the South
Linguists To Meet
"The Oral Approach to Teach-
ing Languages" will be discussed
at a meeting of the Michigan Lin-
guistic Society at 1:30 p.m. today
in Rackham Amphitheater.
Prof. Charles C. Fries, director
of the English Language Insti-
tute, Prof. Hide Shohara of the
Far Eastern Languages depart-
ment and Prof.- Yao Shen of the
English Language Institute will
read. papers on the subject of
languages.

Quadrangle. In 1950, two sep-
arate bond issues were used to
finance the $5,700,000 structure.
= The first of the two bond issues
amounted to $5,700,000. But a large
part of this money-2,909,000 to
be exact-went to pay off a bank
loan which helped in turn to re-
finance some other dorms in 1946.
The rest of the money from
this first bond issue ($2,544,000)
provided part of the money to
build the new quad. To back up
this bond issue, the University
pledged the revenue of East Quad,
Victor Vaughan and Alice Lloyd
Hall.
Then a second bond issue the
same year provided the rest of the
money ($3,300,000) to build South
Quad, and this issue was backed
by the revenue of South Quad it-
self. The extra cash collected be-
yond the cost of the quad, went
for a "debt service charge," a re-
serve cushion for annual payments
to bondholders.
Tomorrow's article will discuss
effects of the financing on the
quad resident's wallet.

Complicated Bond System
Pays for Residence Halls

lOc each
25c each

week for 50 weeks=$

week

50c each week

for 50 weeks=$
for 50 weeks=$
for 50 weeks=$
for 50 weeks=$

5.00
1 x,50
25.00
50.00
100.00

$1.00
$2.00

each
each

week
week

It

Be smart!
Join our
Christmas Club
Now

$3.00 each week for 50 weeks=$ 150.00

a {

$5.00
$10.00

each
each

week
week

for 50 weeks=$ 250.00
for 50 weeks=$ 500.00
for 50 weeks=$1000.00

$20.00 each week

ANN ARBOR BANK
Main at Huron
330 South State Street
1 108 South University Avenue

-Daily-Dick Gaskili
PROF. NORTON DISCUSSES EUROPEAN TOUR

I.

n.'

much of Prof. Norton's time. HeT
is at present serving on com-
mittees for students doing dis-
sertation work in fields related
to the theater, including mu-
sicology, English and fine arts.
The speech department's next
major production, scheduled for
January is the Moliere drama
"Tartufe," which Prof. Norton is
directing. The play, according to
the director, is a "period play,"
defined as a play written in the
past reflecting the time in which
it was written. ,
. The 17th century drama about
an imposter is a difficult produc-
tion, according to Prof. Norton,
for it must reflect the motivations
of the actors according to the so-
cial conditions, environment, even
the costumes of the day-"it must
reflect the feeling of that period."

Chance Discovery of Scrolls
Leads to Intensive Research

x- in our Jewel Touched
BLOUSES and SWEATERS
Mmml What beauties!
BLOUSES, little jeweled collars and scoop
necks in nylons, tissue failles, wool jer-
seys, and boucles. Priced from 5.95 tof
12.95.
SPARKLE TRIMMED CARDIGANS in'
zephyr light wools from 8.95 to regal
orlons at 14.95. Sizes to 40.
530 S. FOREST CAMPUS TOGGERY
just off South U. 1111 South U. near the Diag

By JANE HOWARD
Wandering around caves which
surround the Dead Sea area in
Palestine six years ago, an Arab
idly, tossed a rock into one of the
caverns.
To his amazement he heard
something shatter inside, and went
in to find ancient jars containing
scrolls. His discovery opened the
door for intense research by Bib-
lical scholars and archaeologists
all over the world.
* * *
THB SHATTERED item was,
only one of a collection of jars
which held scrolls believed to have
been inscribed between 7 B.C. and
3 A.D. The documents pertain to
affairs of people who lived in Pal-
estine in the period between events
prtrayed in the Old and New
Testaments.
At a recent discussion on
these "Dead Sea Scrolls" Prof.
Kenneth Mendenhall of the
Near Eastern Studies depart-
ment traced the significance of
the manuscripts throughout his-
tory.
"No decisive conclusions can be
made yet," Mendenhall explained,
"since the discovery of the scrolls
has led to years of research."
Written in Hebrew and in Arama-
ic, the documents include a book
of 200 hymns of David, various
manuscripts, a book called "Wars
of the Children of Light and the
Children of Darkness," a frag-
mentary history of King Herod
the Great, and parts of Ecclesias-
teb and other Biblical books.
s * s
AS WELL as official records and
histories, some of the scrolls tell
of the day-to-day customs of the
Palestinians who probably wrote
them. Mendenhall pointed out
that their way of life was commu-
nistic, since records show the
people of the time owned little but
their clothing.
"Every two years," he re-
marked, "people in this society
gave up their wealth to the com-
munity."
There was no money in these
Palestinian communities, but in-
Jividuals were penalized for of-
fenses, such as "falling asleep at a
meeting of the many," by.cutting
short their food rations for a spec-
ified period.
Although the manuscripts have
as yet given no clear reference to
AFROTC Band
To Play Carols
The Air Force ROTC band will
make a tour of the campus play-
ing Christmas carols and hymns
at 8 p.m. tomorrow.
After leaving North Hall the

Christianity, Mendelhall predicted
that they would have "quite an im-
pact on the text of the Bible."
Discovery of the scrolls also leads
to speculations on the history of
human languages in general, he
said, and may lead to a "drawing
up of the story of the development
of the alphabet."
Petition Deadline
Deadline for those who wish to
submit petitions to become J-Hop
photographers is Thursday.
Interested photographers may
turn in petitions to Donna Hoff-
man, 1520 S. University, NO-
2-2569. Petitions should include
suggestions for background and
list equipment, prices and a sam-
ple of work.

arcadejewelry
shop
December 12, 1953
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I1

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Dec. 13-God the Preserver of Man,
5:00 P.M.: SundayEvening Service.
8:00 PM.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained, at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings from
7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30 to
4:30,
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH,
502 East Huron, Phone 7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Pastor and Student Coun-
selor
9:45 A.M.. The Student Class discusses "What
Students Can Believe About Heaven and Hell."
11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship Service. "Christian
Joy"-Rev. Loucks.
6:45 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild. Mr. and Mrs.
John Reed present a program of Christmas
music and dramatic readings.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.- Student Seminar, Topic: "Immor-
tality," led by Dr. Abbey.
10:45 A.M.: Worship, "Beyond Discovery," Dr.
Abbey preaching.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship supper. Miss Eunice
Sluyter of the Methodist Board of Missions
will speak briefly.
6:45 P.M.: Christmas program, play, "Dust of
the Road" and readings.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan). ,
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205. Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M.: Morning Service.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Sts.
Masses Daily at 7:00 AM., 8:00 A.M., 9:00 A.M.
Sunday at 8-9:30 A.M, 11-12.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings 7:30 P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in Father Richard Center.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 North Division St.
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Dr. Robert H Whitaker, Chaplain for
Student Foundation
Mrs. Elizabeth M. Davis, Social Director
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and commentary,
(followed by Student breakfast, Canterbury
House.)
10:15-10:45: Junior High Classes
11:00-12:15: Church School..
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer and Sermon.
12:15: After Service Fellowships,
4:30 P.M.: Student Confirmation Class, Canter-
bury House.
6:00-7:30: Youth Group.
6:00 P.M.: Student Supper Club, Canterbury
House.
7:00 P.M.: Confirmation Class for Parish adults.
8:00 P.M.: Evensong and Commentary.
DURING THE WEEK
Tuesday and Friday 4:00 to 6:00 Student Tea,
Canterbury House. Wednesday and Thursday
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion, followed by stu-
dent breakfast. Friday 12:10 P.M. Holy Com-
munion; 6Friday at 4:00 to 5:30 student tea,
Canterbury House.

11

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
William H. Bos, Minister to Students
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service. Rev. Press will
speak on "The Way of God's Word."
7:00 P.M.: Student Guild at Bethlehem Church.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
William and State Sts.
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
10:45 A.M.: Dr. Parr will speak on "The Un-
quenched Light."
6:00 P.M.: Student Guild will meet at the Guild
house for a Christmas buffet. Following that
program the Guild will join the S.R.A. in the
Campus Carol sing.

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y M.C.A. Auditorium

Sundays: 10:15, 11:00 A.M., 7:30P.M,
Thursdays: 7:30 P M., Bible Study.
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth"
WXYZ-ABC Network
Sundays: 1:00-1:30 P.M.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenow Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips. Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Two Worship Oppor-
tunities, with the pastor preaching on "Making
Christmas Worthwhile." (Holy Communion in
both services.)
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper.
Sunday at 7:00: Candlelight Christmas Song Ser-
vice, "Joy to the World."
Wednesday, 8:00-11:30: Christmas Open House in
the living quarters of Pastor and Mrs. Scheips.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship Pulpit Speaker:
Mr. E. W. Franklin, Director of Public Instruc-
tion,Central Provinces, India.
Nursery for children during service.
9:45 A.M.: Church School.
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Christmas Buffet and program at Guild House,
6:00 P.M.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:00 A.M.: Matins Service.
10:00 A.M.: Bible Class.
11:00 A.M.: Worship Service.
7:00 P.M.: Christmas Program.
Wednesday, 7:30 P.M.: Annual Christmas Party.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
AND STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenow Ave.
Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Charles Mitchell, Assistant Minister
William S. Baker, Student Pastor
Donna B. Lokker, Program Assistant
9:15 A.M.: Breakfast discussion on "Our Lord
Jesus Christ."
9:15 and 11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship. Dr.,
Kuizenga preaching on "On Being Biblically
Embarrassed. "
5:30P.M.: Westminster Student Fellowship Sup-
per Cost, 50c.
6.45 P.M.: Special Christmas Service with car-

0

4

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rDA Ir 12101 C rflh1fDf1Li 11

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