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December 11, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-12-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE Sx

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1953

CULTURE BY THE TERM:
Students, Staff Rent Art Reprints

By JIM DYGERT
When a student is seen strug-
gling across the diag with a large,
framed picture, the first impres-
sion is that he has made a fruit-
ful visit to a local art gallery, or
is a member of an int'ernational
smuggling ring.
** *
THE COLLECTION, housed in
Rm. 510 of the Administration
Bldg., contains 948 framed repro-
ductions of famous paintings,
which may be rented by students,
faculty and staff members for 50
cents a semester.
During orientation week at
the beginning of each semester,
about 600 of. the prints are ex-
hibited in the Rackham Gallery.
Prints may not be rented dur-
ing this week because of the
confusion that would be caused,
but students may sign up for
one print in the first week of
school.
Faculty and staff members are
eligible to rent a print in the sec-
ond week. Although the original
limit is one picture to a person,
more may be obtained after the
first rush.
In charge of the collection is
Mrs. Michael Conkey, reception-
ist in the office of Student Af-
fairs. According to Mrs. Conkey,
many students initially rent a
print merely to cover up con-
spicuously bare walls, but often
develop an , attachment for the
picture they rentedsand are re-
luctant to return it at- the end of
the semester.
A MORE or less educational
function is also served by the pic-
tures, for students previously un-
acquainted with art often become
interested after a semester with
a print -from the collection.
Manuel Krashin, a fine arts
'student, assists Mrs. Conkey
with the collection. Since he
began work with the collection
this fall, the office in 510 has
been open daily from 3 to 5 p.m.
and the former storage room
has been redecorated to' look.
more like an art office.
- The collection was born seven
years ago when a Detroit depart-
ment store donated 400 prints to
the University and a fund was set
aside to frame the pictures and
buy more.
Since then, the collection has
grown through other gifts and
purchases made from rental fees
to become the largest collection
of its kind in the United States.
Although the popularity of the
prints is evidenced by the bare
shelves in the office, Mrs. Conkey
intends to make more students
aware of the collection, which is
primarily for them, by a campus-
.wide poster campaign before the
end of the semester.

U' Linguists
To Gather
Four papers on the teaching of
languages will be read during a-
meeting of the Michigan Linguis-
tic Society at 1:30 p.m. tomorrow
in Rackham Amphitheater.
Papers written by Prof. Charles
C. Fries, director of the English
Language Institute, Prof. Hide
Shohara of the Far Eastern Lan-
guages department and Prof. Yeo
Shen of the English Language In-
stitute will be read.
The reading of two other papers,
one -by James Downer of the De-
partment of English and the other
by Edward Anthony of the Insti-
tute will conclude the meeting.
Medical Directors
To Discuss Health
Industrial medical directors from
all over the United States will
discuss developments in industrial
medicine and evaluate the impact
of present practices on future pro-
gress at 9:30 p.m. today in the
School -of Public Health.

Excite . ent,

Suspense

t

Reign at o cl ey Game

-Daily-,Dick Gaskill
MRS. CONKEY BEAMS OVER ONE OF THE PRINTS FOR LOANING

U Telecourse
Series Slated
"The Land and Peoples of Latin
America" will be brought to tele-
vision screens throughout the state
at 1 p.m. this Sunday as part of
the University's weekly television
hour.
The program, which will at-
tempt to create a better under-
standing of our neighbors to the:
south, is the first in the series of
a new seven-week telecourse.
Coordinator of the course on
Latin America will be Prof. Philip.
B. Taylor, Jr., chairman of the
program in Latin American Stud-
ies Committee.
Also slated for Sunday's pro-
gram is "The Casting of Metals,"
as taught by Prof. Richard A.
Flinn, of the engineering college.
The one-hour show will be pre-
sented over WWJ-TV, Detroit,,
WJIM-TV, Lansing, and WKZO-
TV, Kalamazoo.
Bull-Ring Group
To Hold Meeting
The Bull-Ring, a group com-
prised of faculty members and
graduate students, will meet at 9
p.m. today at the Roundtable, 1114
W. Huron.1
Organized in 1949 by Prof. Aus-
tin Warren of the -English depart-
ment, the club was formed to ef-
fect an intellectual exchange be-I
tween the various departments of
the University.

Where will your education take you? Is it a part of your
plan for a successful and remunerative career? If not,
we invite you to investigate the opportunities for young.
Americans in FOREIGN TRADE or FOREIGN SERVICE
The American Institute For Foreign Trade is a graduate-level
institution specifically designed to give you the training need-
ed to fulfill the exacting requirements of American business
and government in their international operations. Advanced
degrees given.
.'r.
At the end of your one-year intensive course of training,
you will be able to speak and understand one of the modern
romance languages, you will understand the complexities of
foreign trade and international exchange and you will be
familiar with the history, politic's, geography and sociology
of one of the major world areas-Latin America, Western
Europe, or the Far East,
Write to:
The Committee on Admissions
American Institute for Foreign Trade
Thunderbird Field I. Phoenix, Arizona

"The greatest spectator sport in
America."
That's the way an ardent hock-
ey fan would describe the action,
the excitement and the thrill of
watching his favorite sport.
OFTEN referred to as being
second only to the South Ameri-
can game of Jai Alai as the
world's fastest sport, ice hockey
certainly rates high on the list
when it comes to offering its
watchers a great exhibition com-
bined with the suspense of rugged
competition.
Here at Michigan, hockey en-
thusiasts are doubly fortunate
for not only does the University
possess a hockey squad, but it
happens to have the nation's
finest, the National Collegiate
Athletic Association champions.
Six times the Wolverine puck-
sters have journeyed to Colorado
Springs to compete in the annual
N.C.A.A. collegiate championship
tournament after sweeping
through rigorous 20 to 25-game
schedules with only few losses.
Four times the Maize and Blue
returned to Ann Arbor with the
huge trophy symbolic of United
States collegiate hockey suprem-
acy.
Last March, after an uphill
struggle to even qualify for the
tournament, Heyliger and - his
team again went west and once
more the Wolverines swept
through their two games to the
title.
This season the team will be
out to retain its crown. This week-
end the Wolverines battle Toronto
University in two non-league tilts
before engaging the Nodaks of
North Dakota in the first Midwest
Collegiate Hockey League clashes
of the season' at Grand Forks,
N.D., on the 18th and 19th of the
month.

-4

THE PUCK GETS TOO CLOSE FOR COMFORT

'I

4

SCARVES AND HOT COFFEE ARE ALWAYS IN ORDER

HOCKEY WHETS THE APPETITE

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