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September 22, 1953 - Image 16

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-09-22

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THIE 1IIICGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1953

SEEN AS 'NORMAL FLUCTUATION':

Wins Award

'U' Grade Point Average Dips to 2.57

Zerman Sees Few Shifts
In Policies on Deferment

By PAT ROELOFS
Undergraduate grade point aver-
ages for the 1952-53 year dropped
a minute .01 from the previous
year's 2.58 record with women
undergrads still holding the up-,
per hand academically, accord-
ing to registrar's .office tabula-
tions.
The accelerated examination
schedule initiated in the spring
of 1953 generally was not held
responsible for the slight drop in
the overall average. Most students
saw the grade dip as a "normal
fluctuation."
UNDERGRADUATE women
maintained their traditional mar-
gin of grade superiority over men.
According to breakdown figures
women matched their 2.66 record
SAC Adopts
IFC Rushing
Plan Change
Interfraternity Council rushing
counselors will be allowed to rush
in the future under a decision'
made by the Student Affairs Com-
mittee last week.
In approving the IFC by-law per-
mitting counselors to rush, SAC
reversed its unanimous vote taken
last spring against the plan.
REVERSAL came on an 11 to
one vote after IFC president C. A.
Mitts, '54, asked the group to re-
view its decision.
Appearing before SAC along
with William Zerman, Univers-
ity counselor to fraternities, and
IFC vice-president John Baity,
'55, Mitts stressed the public re-
lations role of counselors and
the bulk of their work consisted
of "selling the fraternity sys-
tem" to prospective rushees.
Chief objection to allowing
counselors to participate in house
rushing was the possibility of con-
flicting loyalties which might.arise
between counseling and rushing
activities.
Mitts pointed out, however,
that this conflict would seldom
arise since only five or six men
come in a day during rushing
to ask counselors questions
about individual houses.
The IFC president stressed the
experimental aspect of the change
which was undertaken to im-
proye the calibre of men in the
counseling program.
IFC officers had felt fraternitiesj
were holding back their best men
under the old system because they
wanted them to participate in
rushing.

of 1951-52 while men dropped .02
points to a 2.51 average.
A rise from 2.37 to 2.38 was
reported for the freshman class
with first year men gaining .02
and women raising their aver-
age .01.
Although independent women
established a new record of 2.66
grade points a breakdown of var-
ious housing divisions shows that
women's resi Ience halls lost .03
from the preceding academic year.
COMMENTING on the drop in
scholastic averages of residence
hall women Dean of Women Deb-
orah Bacon saw the change from
the previous year as "insignifi-
cant." She noted that despite the
minute drop, every form of wom-
en's housing had higher scholastic
standing than men's housing units
on campus.
Pointing out the top grade
earners among women's housing
units-Martha Cook dormitory,
Henderson League House, Couz-
en's Hall for nurses and Alpha
Xi Delta sorority-Dean Bacon
noted that these four groups
have one thing in common: no
freshmen women. "Freshmen
are naturally always in the low-
er grade bracket groups," she
reported.
Sororities show the most notice-
able grade decline among women's
housing groups, dropping from
2.70 to 2.64. According to Martha
Hill, '54, president of Panhellenic,
this .06 drop may be attributed to
a combination of factors. First,
the 1951-52 average of 2.70 was a
record high for sororities. The ac-
celerated examination schedule
put into effect last spring was
listed by Miss Hill as a factor of
slight significance.
Dean Bacon pointed out that
another factor having an effect
on the grade averages of sorori-
ties was the inclusion of grades
of fall pledges in the computa-
tions. Previously sorority pledg-
es were taken only in the spring,
and freshmen women became
accustomed to University scho-
lastic work before their grades
went into the sorority average.
C. A. Mitts, '54, president of the
Interfraternity Council, reported
that the .05 drop in the overall
fraternity average for last year
was the result of a policy of aver-
aging all pledge grades, including
those who later depledged. In the
past, fraternities depledged men
failing to maintain a two point
overall, but under the present
plan each fraternity is held re-
sponsible for the scholastic aver-
age of all men pledging.
Breakdown figures according to
housing groups are as follows

RESIDENCE HALLS
Grade-Point
Rank Student Group Average
1 Martha Cook Building ...3.06
2 Henderson House ........2.88
3 Couzens Hall ............2.79
4 Betsy Barbour House .....2.72
5 Greene House ............2.69
5 Palmer House ............2.69
7 Mary Hinsdale House .....2.65
7 Angell House ............2.65
9 Reeves House .............2.61
10 Kleinstueck House ........2.60
11 Helen Newberry Residence.2.59
Women's Residence Halls . .2.59
12 Adelia Cheever House....2.56
13 Michigan House ..........2.55
13 Van Tyne ................2.55
15 Gomberg House ..........2.54
1~5 Scott House ..............2.54
17 Adams House ............2.53
17 Huber House .............2.53
19 Strauss House ............2.52
20 Taylor House , ..........2.51
21 Mosher Hall .............2.50
22 Jordan Hall ..............2.49
Men's Residence Halls ....2.49
23 Anderson House ..........2.47
23 Stockwell Hall ....,......2.47
23 Wenley House ............2.47
26 Allen-Ruisey House .....2.46
26 Winchell House ...'...,...2.46
28 Kelsey House ............2.45
28 Lloyd House .............2.45
30 Chicago House ...........2.43
30 Hayden House ...........2.43
32.Williams House .......,...2.42
33 Hinsdale House ..........2.38
34 Vaughan House..........2.33
34 Cooley House...........2.33
36 Fletcher Hall.........2.26
37 Prescott House..........2.18
* * * ' '' '
LEAGUE HOUSES
Grade-Point
Rank Student Group Average
1 Williams ................3.13
2 Gorton ..................2.93
3 Icheldinger..............2.91
4 Freeman 1805 ............2.90
5 Reeves ..................2.84

6 Yost.....................2.81
7 Hobbs ...................2.78
8 Elliott ...................2.73
League Houses ...........2.70
9 Voght ...................2.69
10 Shaefer ...............2.67
11 Field ...................2.66
12 Gucker .... .............2.57
13 Freeman 1811 ............2.53
14 Wilcox ..................2.4
14 Anger.................2.43
14 Freeman 902 .............2.49
17 Hodges ................x.2.48
* * *
CO-OPERATIVE HOUSES
Grade-Point
Rank Student Group Average
1 Osterweil Co-op House ....2.86
Women's Co-op Houses ...2.71
2 Stevens Co-op House ....2.70
3 Robert Owen Co-op House .2.61
4 Nakamura Co-op House ...2.50
5 Michigan Co-op House ...2.49
Men's Co-op Houses ......2.48
6 Nelson International Hse. .2.46
7 Lester Co-op House .......2.41
.' * *
GENERAL FRATERNITIES
" Grade-Point
Rank Student Group Average
1 Zeta Beta Tau4.....
2 Phi Gamma Delta.......2.67
3 Alpha Epsilon Pi........2.64
4 Sigma AlphaMu........2.62
5 Acacia .................2.61
6 PiLambda Phi..........2.57
7 Phi Kappa Sigma ........2.55
7 Delta Upsilon...........2.55
9 Beta Theta Pi,...........2.54
9 Chi Psi ..................2.54
9 Sigma Phi ...............2.54
9 Sigma Nu ...............2.54
13 Tau Delta Phi ...........2.53
All Men .................2.51
14 Phi Sigma Delta .........2.51
14 Kappa Sigma ........,...2.51
16 Theta Xi ................2.48
16 Delta Sigma Phi..........2.48
16 Sigma Chi......... 2.48
19 Tau Kappa Epsilon ......2.47
20 Phi Kappa Tau ..........2.46

20 Triangle................2.46
General Fraternities .....2.46
22 Trigon ..................2.44
23 Alpha Sigma Phi .........2.43
24 Psi Upsilon ..............2.42
25 Sigma Phi Epsilon ........2.41
26 Phi Sigma Kappa ........2.39
27 Delta Chi... .............2.38
28 Sigma Alpha Epsilon .....2.37
29 Lambda Chi Alpha .......2.36
30 Delta Tau Delta ..........2.35
30 Alpha Delta Phi .........2.35
32 Theta Delta Chi .........2.33
33 Alpha Tau Omega........2.32
33 Phi Kappa Psi ...........2.32
33 Chi Phi .................2.32
36 Delta Kappa Epsilon .....2.29
37 Phi Delta Theta ..........2.28
38 Theta Chi ..,............2.27
39 Alpha Phi Alpha ........2.26
40 Zeta Psi .................2.22
41 Kappa Alpha Psi .........2.12
* * *
GENERAL SORORITIES
Grade-Point
Rank Student Group Average
1 Alpha Xi Delta ...........2.86
2 Pi Beta Phi,...........2.82
3 Chi Omega ..............2.75
4 Alpha Epsilon Phi........2.71
4 Kappa Kappa Gamma .... 2.71
4 Alpha Delta Pi ...........2.71
7 Alpha Gamma Delta .....2.69
8 Alpha Phi.............2.68
9 Delta Gamma ............2.66
9 Sigma Delta Tau ........2.66
All Women ..... ........2.66
11 Gamma Phi Beta.......2.65
11 Delta Zeta.............2.65

Draft elegible male students
pursuing a full course at the Uni-
versity and maintaining a fairly
good grade average generally will
be allowed to complete the school
year, according to William Zer-
man, selective service counselor.
However, Zerman emphasized,
much is left to the discretion of
the student's local draft board,
GENERALLY, few changes have
been made in last year's policies.
on drafting students. Most draft
boards base their to-draft-oir-not-
to-draft decisions on two main
factors: the student's academic
standing and/or his grade on the
selective service college deferment,
test given once a semester.
No date has been announced
for this semester's test as yet,
but Zerman urged students who
have not taken the test previ-

Draft quotas for the year are
expected to remain about the
same, with no decrease becauseof
the Korean armistice, Zerman
said.
Zerman added that the draft
situation has not come to the point
where the engineering student is
given deferment preference over
the English major. He pointed out
that high academic standing is
usually a more important consid-
eration than course of study.
Students anxious to keep draft
board "greetings" out of the mail-
box were urged by Zerman to fill
out and file in the registrar's office
forms 109, which was distributeed
during registration.

T

$1,000 PRIZE-Prof. George A.
Peek of the political science de-
partment this year received the
1919 Literary College class
award of $1,000 given annually

Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

13
14
15
16
17
18
18
20

General Sororities 2.65
Alpha Chi Omega .........2.64
Delta Sigma Theta .......2.57
Delta Delta Delta.......2.51
Alpha Omicron Pi ........2.50
Collegiate Sorosis ........2.49
Kappa Alpha Theta ......2.47
Kappa Delta ,...........2.47
Alpha Kappa Alpha .......2.33 1

PENS REPAIRED AT
PEN 115 WEST
DSPITAL LIBERTY

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STUDENT TRAVEL
LET BOERSMA TRAVEL SERVICE HANDLE
ALL YOUR DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL
TRAVEL ARRANGEMENTS
REGISTER NOW FOR STUDENT TOURS
TO EUROPE IN 1954
ALSO:
THE BOERSMA SPECIAL
FOR THE EASTER HOLIDAYS:
COLLEGE WEEK
IN BERMUDA
SEVEN NIGHTS AND SIX FULL DAYS IN BURMUDA

f.

OFFICIAL JEWELERS TO MOST NATIONAL SO-
CIAL AND HONORARY FRATERNITIES AND
SORORITIES . .
Your campus headquarters for:
Official jewelry, favors, gifts, rings, pledge pins,
Recognition pins, Beer Mugs, Paddles, Sweat-
shirts, Medals, Trophies and Awards, Station-
ary, Formal Invitations, Dance Programs, and
all types of Crested items . .

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