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December 08, 1953 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-12-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

M I

PAGE SIX
Cards Carry
Good Wishes
For Season
New Year's Greetings
Date Back To Rome
In First Century A.D.
By ELAINE EDMONDS
When those Christmas greetings
begin filling mailboxes this holi-
day season, don't think this is a
relatively new custom.
People have been doing it for
the past 8,000 years. Even before
there was a Christmas and per-
haps since mankind first recog-
nized the eoming of a new year,
people have sent good wishes to
their friends at this season.
Personal New Year's messages
attached to gifts have been found
in Egyptian tombs of the sixth
century B.C. Ready-made New
Year's greetings were probably
first sold and were quite the "rage"
in Rome in the first century A.D.
AFTER ROMAN times no record
of ready-made greeting cards ex-
ists for over a thousand years.
Then in Germany about 1450,
woodcut New Year's cards sudden-
ly appeared in numbers with the
invention of printing. Although
the style was medieval, the sub-
jects used were often similar to
those of today, a favorite being

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, DECEMBER8, 1952

SPACE HELMET OR CHEMISTRY SET?
Shopping Suggestions Given for All Members of Family

'p

By PAM SMITH
Stumped about what to give the
members of your family for Christ-
mas?
The shopper who is staggered by
the wealth of new and fascinating
toys on the market might do well
to choose a toy that will reflect his
own little brother's or sister's spe-
cial interests.
* * *
A LITTLE girl who has her heart
set on becoming a nurse would
probably love a nurse's uniform
and cap and a kit full of Red Cross
essentials for taking care of ail-
ing dolls.
If little brother has to be
dragged away from his electric
trainsatanight, he'll love any
one of the many working models
of railroad apparatus, such as
electric switches or an exact rep-
lica of a signal tower.
Or maybe you have an embryo
scientist in the family. The per-
fect gift for such a child might be
a chemistry set complete with
chemicals, and clear instructions
on how to do experiments that are
both fascinating, and safe for the
youngsters.
* * *
IF HIS scientific interests are
concentrated on space travel, he
might be interested in a rocket
gun, space helmet or space port
for his space ships.
Dolls are an ever-present
must on every little girl's list,
and this year the shopper can
choose among dolls that walk,
drink, and cry, or have hair that

-Daily-Dean Morton
OLD CUSTOM-Marilyn Masters, '57, and Pat Mooney, '56P,
shop for Christmas cards. This is not a new custom, as people
have been sending greetings to their friends for 8,000 years.

can be permanented and skin
that is specially treated so the
budding coquette can practice
the art of make-up.
The pre-school set might en-
joy a tooth-brush gun, miniature
gardening or housekeeping equip-
ment or a cuddly 'dog that walks
and talks.
* * *
FATHERS are always a problem
on anyone's Christmas list but
here, too, a little thought about
his special interests will lend some
valuable clues.
If he is a ski enthusiast he
might appreciateea pair of ski
boots with a new widened toe
section for comfort and warmth.
This boot also features an ankle
strap that wraps around the an-
kle four times for added support,
and a "V" cut at the ankle to
accommodate the forward lean
of the skier.
If he gets up before dawn the
day the deer season opens, he'll
love a water repellent hunting
jacket and pants set, complete
with a rubber-coated fabric lin-
ing the game pocket, back, front,
yoke and upper sleeve.
* * *
A FISHERMAN might appreci-
ate a stainless steel fishing knife
with a cork handle to prevent his
losing it if it falls into the water.
Cuff links and tie pins that
indicate his pet hobbies are also
high on a man's preference list.
These sets come in patterns of

antique guns, golf clubs and
trout flies.
If he's not too conservative, or
if the shopper wishes he were less
so, a brightly patterned vest
might be just the thing for him.
A pink shirt or a pair of black and
pink argyles would also be a good
choice.
* * *
IF DAD SPENDS most of his
time downstairs in his workshop
he would probably appreciate a
new tool. or some fascinating gad-
get. One such gadget might be a
"talented tool" that is a hammer,
pliers, nail remover, axe, screw
driver and wire cutters all in one.
Big brother is the one who will
really appreciate the pink shirts
and bright vests that women ad-
mire so much in men's stores.
For women who can knit, a pair
of socks featuring a beer mug
complete with angora foam could
be just the thing for a brother
who prides himself on his clothes
taste.
A BROTHER who treats his
jalopy with all the tenderness and
concern of a mother for her first
born, would appreciate a novel
horn that plays tunes or a flashy
hood ornament.
Any one of the new miracle
fabric shirts in a plaid or bright
pattern would please a big
brother on Christmas morning.
For brothers, little or big, who
love to swim an unexpected and

well-received gift might be a pair
of swim fins, a fishing spear and
a snorkel attachment to enable
him to stay under the water for
long periods.
* * *
A CHESS FIEND would prob-
ably welcome a minature leather-
covered chess set to take with him
on his travels.
For mother or an older sister,
the shopper can choose anything
ranging from a practical gift for
the house to something wholly
frivolous.
A soft, pastel-colored orlon
sweater would rate high on any l

U

woman's gift list. For a touch of
added glamour, a sweater decor-
ated with pearls or rhinestones
might be chosen.
* * *
SILVER, crystal or china in her
particular pattern is a good choice
for an older sister about to be
married. An engaged girl-and her
fiance--might also appreciate one
of the many excellent and compre-
hensive cook books on the market.
If Mother is a cat fancier, what
could please her - or the whole
family-more than a tailess Manx
cat or a blue-eyed Siamese kitten
purring under the Christmas tree
on Christmas morning?

the Christ Child pulling a wagon
of good wishes.
By the sixteen century the
style had changed to pure Ren-
aissance and the crude German
rhymes had been replaced by
elegant Latin verse. At this time,
however, the greeting card cus-
tom disappeared again.
Up until this time and for sev-
eral centuries to follow only New
Year's cards were exchanged. Not

MAKE FOLLETT'S
YOUR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING
HEADQUARTERS

until early in the Victorian era did
the Christmas card make its ap-
pearance
One of the most novel of the
New Year's greetings was the "ad-
dress" circulated by newspaper
carriers around the first half of
the seventeenth century. These
"addresses" were seasonal greet-
ings often containing a resume
of the past year's efforts and in-
variably signing off with a more
or less outspoken request for a tip.
* * *
THE NEWSBOYS did not keep
a monopoly. on New Year's "ad-
dresses" for long. Firemen, letter
carriers, billposters, lamplighters,
messengers and other public serv-
ants soon adopted the idea.
After 2000 years of New Year's
greetings the honest-to-goodness
Christmas card appeared in Eng-
land in the 1840's.
In 1846, J. G. Horsley designed
and published the first authentic
Christmas card in London.
The design consisted of three
panels in a rustic framework. The
central section depicted a festive
drinking scene, which caused great
wrath in temperance circles, and
the two flanking panels were de-
voted to acts of Christmas charity
entitled "Feeding the Hungry" and
"Clothing the Needy.

1 '
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Books
Christmas Cards

Toys
Games

Wrappings
Stationery
Pens
Typewri ters

Records
Children's
Books
Playthings

Open Saturday Afternoons and Monday Evenings
SHOP AT

UNDER the design there ap-
peared probably for the first time
those well-known words "A Merry
Christmas and a Happy New Year
to you."
Horsley claimed to have in-
vented the Christmas card and
it is very probable that he was
the first to produce a full pic-
torial effect; but he drew his
inspiration for the " greetings
that people in England had been
sending to their friends for
years.
The polite people of that day
were accustomed to sending greet-
ings to their friends on special oc-
casions such as New Years, Christ-
mas and birthdays.
Christmas cards really got go-
ing commercially when London
and Paris firms seized upon the
idea with gusto and began pro-
ducing pictorial cards with de-
signs, many of which are rare
beauties.
Modern Christmas cards run the
gamut from flue art to home-made
snapshot cards.
Each year more and more peo-
ple express their good will and
their wishes for a happy holiday
season to their friends by send-
ing cards.

MAIN AT LIBERTY ANN ARBOR
Only the finest quality at prices that are fair
Permanent
pleated to last through all your
travels whether from dorm to class .
from campus home for holidays . .
that magic fabric of orlon plus wool,
Lorette ... keeps you neat and clean
'cause it truly launders.
Blue, green, .pink in misses sizes.
16.95

~ <f
d'

Heap Big Style
at papoose Pice!

Cozy and snug as a tepee, soft-sole
Indian beaded moccasins with matching Bunny
fur collar . . . designed to pamper your feet.
with comfort. Full sizes 4 to 9.
COLORS: Red, white, powder blue.
MAST'S CAMPUS STORE 619 E. LIBERTY
Please send me pairs of "Honeybugs" at $2.99 each.
COLOR SIZE . COLOR SIZE
1 CHECK C.O.D._
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
T IE
2 STORES

MICHIGAN BOOKSTORE
State Street at North University
* *
# w E9
" , A A

619 East Liberty
Ph. NO 2-0266

121 South Main
Ph. NO 2-6326

h

SSHE'LL BE "NECK-HIGH" IN FASHION WITH
STHAT MINK COLLAR and cuff set she's been
Sdreaming about, at 16.95 .
Collars only, at 10.00.
MATCHING MINK EARRINGS, pins, and brace-
lets, too, at 3.00
and there's collar magic in our heathers or an-
gores at 2.25--plus ties of all kinds from 1.00
GOING ROUND in the "best circles" are our
waist whittling belts. Narrow leathers, velvets,
\ metals. Wide cinches and contours. from 1.00
to 10.95
Wits-N
Y{, :): :S .6 +r : ':::'';: " 0

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POITNTERS

FOR

CHRISTMAS GIVING

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give gloves for warmth and beauty

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