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December 08, 1953 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-12-08

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TESDAY, DECEMBER S, 1953

Faculty

Cooks

Reveal

Favorite

Menus,

I

Dishes

4

PROF. GRAF SELECTS A RECIPE

PROF. SCANIO SHOPS FOR INGREDIENTS

'MIX WELL' SAYS PROF. O'NEILL

PROF. KISH MAKES THE CRUCIAL TEST

By JANET FORD
Voila le potage!
That's how to say "soup's on"
in French, but several University
faculty members find it enjoyable
to cook and eat in other languages
as well.
To Prof. Otto G. Graf of the
-German department; cooking is
an art and not just a utility. He
specializes particularly in French,
Chinese and Japanese cookery.
His cookbook collection includes
over 60 volumes written in a
variety of languages. One of the
books, ° valuable 17th century
Postmaster
Gives T]ips
For Mailing
The proper way to wrap Christ-
mas packages, that tediously be-
wildering job most people dislike,
was explained to Ann Arborites by
Postmaster Oswald Koch.
"Use a solid box," he began, "and
fasten it with twine, wire or a
banding material. Boxes sufficient-
ly wrapped for ordinary mail eas-
ily get damaged at Christmas
time. Also gummed paper wrap-
ping has little chance of holding
because of the beating that the
boxes take- in the large postal
terminals."
THE ADDRESS should be writ-
ten plainly, the postmaster con-
tinued, using a ball point pen or
indelible pencil to insure that the
writing won't smudge off when
exposed to the elements.
Books are subject to a reduced
rate if declared on the outside
of the package. The rate is eight
cents for the first pound and
four for each additional pound
in all mailing zones.
No additional charge is made
for enclosed greeting cards; how-
ever, no other personal corres-
pondence can be enclosed in such
a case.
"The sooner you send the pack-
ages the better," Koch said. "Put
'Do Not Open Till Christmas' on
them if you like. But don't wait
until the last minute."-
"Everyone knows there's no
Santa Claus anyway."

cookbook written in Latin by aa
Spanish Cardinal who was librar-
ian of the Vatican, Prof. Graf
keeps locked in a vault.
* * *
BY "MAKING it a point of
peering into pots," the German
professor has collected recipes
while traveling in Japan, China
and Europe.
Prof. Graf, who is particular-
ly partial to Chinese curries and
Mosem Chinese cooking, counts
curried shrimps and sweet and
sour spareribs among his fa-
vorite dishes to prepare and eat.
The shrimps are cooked with
green pepper, onion and season-
ings while the sweet and sour
flavor of the spareribs is achieved
with soy sauce, sugar and cider
vinegar.
HIS TASTES do not extend to
pastries, however, and in this he'
tends to agree with Prof. Vincent
A. Scanio of the Romance Lan-
guages department who considers
pastry cooking "a purely feminine
activity."
Prof. Scanio pointed out that
Italians prefer fruit for dessert
and while Italian pastry is "far
superior" to French, it is usual-
ly served at tea time and not
as a dinner dessert.
The Italian professor has eaten
Italian style cooking most of his
life and claims he has taken his
mother's recipes as he remembered

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tem aiu uimproveu upon ueumt. ime is eat aiu eayi or J W IU an nour or s, aneyW t De
* * * through, not red." just right," he said.
THE BASIC thing to remember Close friends of the profes- Prof. Kish likes wine in or with
in culinary art is that some things sor's are very enthusiastic all types of food. He claims it is
don'tsgortogethr andhotherstdo
don't go together and others do, about his "omnibus pizza." The "half the meal." Many California
Prof. Scanio said. essence of pizza is "tomatoes wines are as good as European if
"Marshmallow and onions- and onions plus something else," not better, he added.
no! But onions and mushroons the professor divulged. He con- Copper and stainless steel
fried together, plus tomatoes, bines all the possible pizza reci- cooking utensils are best to use,
two lightly beaten eggs and pes and comes up with an "om- if they are available, the geogra-
cheese is delicious." nibus." pher said. He also noted that he
Prof. Scanio first took up cook- .can get most of the ingredients
ing seriously while a graduate stu- Pure nostalgia for his native necessary for his recipes right in
dent at Princeton and later at the Hungarian dishes started Prof. Ann Arbor, or no farther away
University. "It was during the George Kish of the geography de- than Detroit, "if you look hard
depression and much cheaper to partment on the road to cookery. enough."
do m ow coking" h aded. Three basic ingredients of Hun-* * *
* * *y garian cooking, red paprika, white ANOTHER enthusiast of this
used very suc- noodles and green peppers, have art, is Prof. James C. O'Neill, of
SAUCES can beusodnary suc- their colors immortalized in the the Romance Language depart-
tablesand get away from tradi- country's flag. Noodles are eaten ment. He considers himself a
tional eating, according to Prof. as a dessert and are usually served good meat and potato cook. "My
Scanio who likes to fry cauliflower with sugar and poppy seeds, powd- real interest in cooking lies in
and serve it covered with Par ered nuts or cottage cheese. experimental preparation of new
{ neasan cheese. > * *1 dishes from interesting foreign
sPROF. KISH tried out French traditions and adapting them to
Besides the traditional garlic Frhe materials and budget at
and onion found in Italian cook- recipes while a graduate student hand.
ing, the Italian professor uses in Paris and became interested in
basil, Greek thyme and mint for the Italian cuisine while spending Prof. O'Neill claims that he is
seasoning. a year in Italy. already a good cook and all he
would need to be a terrific cook
"Don't go to' great lengths to But his first love is for old- .. .

His tastes also extend to "young
leg of lamb rare, loaded with gar-
lic and served with watercress;
thin slices of Spanish onion and
oranges in French dressing, good
coffee and fat, juicy hamburgs,'
rare."
* * *
WHEN SPEAKING of wines,
the professor's eyes light up. His
motto is "red or white, hot or cold,
with fish or meat."
Wine as an ingredient in
cooking is also highly praised
by Prof. Glenn D. McGeoch, of
the music school. Recently
Prof. McGeoch has been work-
ing to perfect an Italian can-
nelloni - a rolled pasta filled
with chicken, truffles, mush-,
rooms and seasoning. The con-
coction is then rolled like a
horn (hence the name) and
covered with cheese. The mix-
ture is broiled until the cheese
melts.
When ordering ingredients for
his cooking, Prof. McGeoch some-
times finds it necessary to order
from an importer's shop in New
York or to send to Chinatown for
a bird's nest.
The famed bird's nest soup is
very expensive to make and "real-
ly not worth it." The nest is soak-
ed in water and boiled with other
ingredients. "Its consistency is
similar to tapioca pudding and
it has a delicate flavor," Prof. Mc-
Geoch said.
"The test of a good cook," he
added, "is whether he can take
leftovers and make something de-
lectable."

* * * try filled with mushrooms, chives,
PROF. RICHARD C. Boys of the mint, marjoramn, and red wine),
PoOF. RICHARD C. oys of thecolor]

English department gives this ad- '
vice to beginning cooks-buy a
copy of "The Joy of Cooking" byl
Irma S. Rombauer.
Prof.. Boys started cooking
when he was a graduate student
at Johns Hopkins University.
A bushel of oysters cost one
dollar at the Baltimore docks
and would last all winter. Thus,
he learned many ways to pre-
pare oysters and other seafoods.
His specialties include clam
chowder, mussels, oyster stew and
green tomato preserves. Prof.
Boys recommends using a variety
of spices and herbs, but in mod-
eration, and he reports "no ul-
cers," either..
He hascompiledra list of De-
troit restaurants for the Modern
Language Association and has a
large collection of menui ,from
restaurants all over the country.
* * *
ANOTHER English professor,
Karl Litzenberg has always been
interested in cooking: His mother
was a "fancy cook" and he picked
up much of his culinary skill by
observation and experiment.
Prof. Litzenberg who special-
izes in "continental improve-
ments on American dishes" has
prepared a dinner menu for
men.
His "American steak dinner"
consists of a broiled sirloin steak
two and one-half inches thick
marinated in red wine and herbs.
Mushroom timbales (a rolled pas-

a green saiaa ana a rea saiaa

I :

(greens, onions sliced paper thin
and the whole thing turned red
with a liberal supply of paprika)
and French green beans cooked
with sweet summer savory com-
plete the menu.
* * *
THE REASON that the best
men cooks are better than the
best women cooks is that men
don't do it often enough to get
bored, Prof. Litzenberg said.
"The main thing in cooking
is to stand over the stove," he
added,, "and women can't be
bothered with long hours in the
kitchen after a day of house-
keeping."
As advice to beginners, Prof.
Litzenberg suggested that once
they have learned the rudiments
of cooking they "start experiment-
ing with flavors." This is the dif-
ference between a good and an
excellent cook," he said.
He also suggested that perhaps
American housewives ought to
throw away their frying pansand
use the broiler and the oven more.
"The greatest sin in American
cooking is overcooking vegetables,"
he concluded.

i

cooking because then it becomes:
real labor and all the joy is gone,"
is his motto.
* * *
THE FRENCH cuisine, Prof.
Scanio leaves to his wife who is a
"superb cook." When meat is to
be broiled, however, the head of
the Scanio family does it. He

style Hungarian dishes-gulyas
(goulash), noodles with prune
jam and pancakes which are
first fried in a skillet and then
filled with jam, folded, sprinkled
with confectioner's sugar and
placed in a moderate oven.
"If you prepare pancakes before
dinner, and forget about them

is "more time and more money."
The French professor's reper-
toire of recipes includes a "perfect
French dressing," a sea-food cas-
serole of oysters, scallops, had-
dock, shrimp and mushrooms in
white wine and cream sauce, glaz-
ed strawberry tarts in custard and
veal knuckles in white wine.

Help fight TB
Buy Christmas S .jls

,A

DECEMBER OR MARCH?
Christmas Celebrations, Date Once Controversial

/

By ARLENE LISS
Controversy once raged over the
celebration of the now well-estab-
lished institution of Christmas.
The earliest disagreement came
when the early church fathers
could not agree when or indeed if
it should be observed.
ONE FACTION supported the
claims that December 25 as the
date of Christ's birth was the right
day to celebrate while' another
group insisted that March 25, the
date of the resurrection, should be
a day of feast and thanksgiving.
For some time the two groups
waged a verbal war over the is-
sue. King Arthur is reputed to
be the first to celebrate Christ-
mas in December. But the March

SAY 1
0
erry iit
*. TO HER.,. e
vwth a Vt/rfrom 6.itler'
Just a few suggestions'
WATCHES PEN & PENCIL SETS
BRACELETS TRAVEL CLOCKS
RINGS SILVERWARE
EAR RINGS LIGHTERS
NECKLACES COMPACTS
All articles gift wrapped
and mailed if desired
en

faction clung to its belief until,
threatened with excommunica-
tion in the fourth century, it
was forced to give in.
For the next 14 centuries no-
body opposed Christmas celebra-
tions until Oliver Cromwell, Lord
Protector of England, banned the
festivities. The joy that reigned at
this time of the year was incom-
patible with Puritan principles
which advocated more restrained
observances.
This view was echoed in New
England in 1659 when a law was
passed subjecting any p e r s o n
found celebrating Christmas tol
fine or imprisonment.
* *.*
OBJECTIONS FROM the Puri-
tans were aimed at the wild revels
which turned England into chaos
at Christmastide. A Lord of Mis-
rule was appointed in most vil-
lages and towns, legalizing the
pranks and mischief-making pre-
valent at the time. Such pageants
even disturbed church services by
frequently interrupting the ser-
mon.
In more modern times Christ-
mas was not officially banned in
Nazi Germany, but it was strong-
ly disapproved. Christmas was
against the Nazi race and reli-
gious theories and therefore the
"COME IN AND
TRY IT! the
0NvW ROYAL
PORTABLE
WITH SENSATIONAL NEW
SPEED SELECTOR!
g *

celebrations had to be modified
to fit into the National Social-
ist doctrine.
Some fervent Nazis went as far
as to abandon the Christmas cele-
bration in favor of a festival to
the sun god whom old legends des-
cribe as returning to earth soon
after December.
* * *
IN AMERICA, except during the
Puritan interlude, Christmas has
been celebrated regularly in a fa-
shion that incorporated the cus-
toms of many lands. Ancient
Rome, H o 11 a n d, Scandinavia,
France, Germany and England
have all contributed to American
tradition.
The practice of hanging green
boughs comes from Rome where
at the Saturnalia the Romans
decorated their homes with
greenery. The ancient and en-
joyable custom of mistletoe had
its origin in England where the
Druids used it in their religious
ritual. Legend dictates that

when a kiss is given under the
mistletoe a berry must be pluck-
ed. There can only be as many
kisses as there are berries.
Santa Claus is the anglicized
version of the Dutch Saint Nico-
laas. However, the American ver-
sion of Saint Nicolaas differs from
the Dutch as it has gathered many
other customs around it. The ori-
ginal legend of a kind-hearted
man who gives gifts to children
on Christmas arose from stories
about Bishop Nicholaas of Myra
who lived in the fourth century.
Nicholaas did many good deeds
and, according to legends, gave
gifts anonymously to many people.
In Holland, Dutch children get
their gifts on December 6 and cele-
brate Saint Nicolaas Day they as
this was the date of his birth.
French children put wooden shoes
by the stove for the Christmas
gifts, but as English children did
not own wooden shoes the custom
arose of hanging up stockings in-
stead.

I

V

FOR. CHRISTMAS
STATIONERY GIFT BOXES
FOUNTAIN PENS
OFFICE FURNITURE
TYPEWRITERS
:.. CALEN DARS
Typewriters
Billfolds.All makes, Portable
Brief Cases and Standard.
Immediate delivery.
Playing Cards~
Photograph Albums Fountain Pens
Sheaffer, Parker,
Scrap BooksEsterbrook.
RUSTCRAFT CHRISTMAS CARDS
We imprint cards purchased here at a small cost.
Since Phone
1908 MO RNO 8-7177
314 South State Street
OPEN SATURDAY TILL 5 P.M.
W AHR'S 'UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
*.. .316 SOUTH STATE
fr ChHttina
' h F tedGPTS louSk tM
Fountain Pen and Pencil sets
Leather Goods
Oil Painting Sets
Glasses and Ash Trays

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I rl A -/ '1 I I I I t r t. /'1 1 i l 1 th 7^ n^ 1

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