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December 08, 1953 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-12-08

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P'AG Si

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, DECEMBER S, 1953

HST Policy
n Reds Hit
By Sallade
"In the years 1946-48 ... refus-
al of Truman Democrats to regard
Communists, in government as
anything more than a 'red her-
ring' is ample testimony to their
ineptitude and unfitness for of-
fice," City Council President
George W. Sallade said at a Re-
publican City Committee luncheor
yesterday.
Speaking of the accomplish-
ments of the present Administra-
tion, Sallade mentioned termina-
tion of hostilities in Korea, econ-
omies in government operation
and the fact that 1,400 security
risks have been eliminated from
the federal payroll.
"I AM HIGHLY amused at the
moans and groans of so many ofl
our well-meaning fellow citizens at
the exposures of obvious laxity or
the part of the Truman Adminis-
tration. I cannot believe that the3
would suppress history merely be-
cause its revelations were disturb-
ing to them," he continued.
"Excuses about the 'moral
climates of the times,' or 'pro-
motion to a safer job where he
could be watched,'have not ex-
plained the inconceivable blind-
ness evidenced by the Truman
Administration in the White ep-
isode," Sallade added.

NEW TECHNIQUES:
Anemia,

Daily Reviews LYL Case History

-y

__/ l.a

-Daily-Chuck Kelsey
A RADIO FIELD DAY WITH OPERATION 4006
OPERATION 4006:
Speech Students To Duplicate
Commercial Radio Routine

Developed
Victims of gout and pernicious
anemia may get relief from re-
cently developed techniques and
medicines made public here at
the regional meeting of the Amer-
ican College of Physicians.
Gout, a painful and sometimes
serious condition despite continued
ridicule by cartoonists and gag-
writers, is a form of arthritis-
an inflammation of the joints.
* * *
DR. WILLIAM D. Robinson of
University Hospital offered hope
to sufferers of the disease in a
paper presented Saturday before
the College, reporting the success-
ful use of a hew drug, Benemid,
in treatment.
The doctor reported that
Benemid appears to be the most
effective agent for diverting
uric acid-thought to be the
acid which forms the crystals
responsible for gout-into the
blood stream and subsequent
elimination as a body waste:
Dr. Robinson said that after
two years of use on patients at
University Hospital the drug hasI
demonstrated a "sustained reduc-
Noted Author1
To Talk Today
At Hillel
Maurice Samuel, noted author,
critic and translator, will speak at
8:30 p.m. tomorrow on "Modern
Jewish Literature; Its Content and
Milieu" in a lecture in the main
chapel of Hillel Foundation, 1429
Hill.
The lecture, sponsored jointly
by the Beth Israel Community
Center and the B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundation, honors Jewish book
month and will deal primarily with
works now available in English.
* *

P U.U/ ' .3. ~'~' ' U~-' ~(Continued from Page 1)
D octors5) Throughout its existance the
by D octors LYL never knowingly has deviat-
ed from the views and policies ad-
vanced by the Communist Party.
tion in serum uric acid (too much This is the crux of the Govern-
acid in the blood stream)." ment's case and their strongest1
* * bargaining point is based on the
PERNICIOUS anemia-a mark- decision reached by the SACB in1
ed increase in the average size of finding, the Communist Party to
red corpuscles-may be relieved be a Communist-action organize-t
by a technique announced at the tion
meeting by Dr. Raymond W. Mon-
to of the Henry Ford Hospital in The McCarran Act defines a
Detroit. Communist-front organization
Vitamin B-12 has been prey- as "any organization in the
iously recognized as an effective United States . . . which is sub-
control of the disease. However, stantially directed, dominated orI
Dr. Monto indicated that suf- controlled by a Communist-ac-
ferers of pernicious anemia fre- tion organization and is primar-
quently demonstrate a defect in ily operated for the purpose oft
the stomach which prevents giving aid and support to a
them from absorbing the vita- Communist-action organization,1
min in tablet form. a Communist foreign govern-
Intra-muscular injection of B-12 ment or the world Communist
was developed to counteract these movement ... "
affects, but requires a physician According to Mike Sharpe,
and a tiresome and expensive chairman of the local' LYL the
routine for the patient, according organization is basing its defense
to Dr. Monto. on the following:
The new method developed by 1) A denial that LYL is domi-
Dr. Monto consists of inhaling nated by the CP. Sharpe main-
vitamin B-12 in crystalline form tains that the organization "elects
through the nose, much like nose its own officers and decides its
drops. The needle is side-stepped own policies."
and sufferers of the disease may 2) Although there may be offi-
inhale the remedy on prescription cers of the organization who are
by the family physician. members of the Communist Party
the Labor Youth League sets down
} eno qualifications for holding of-
Pe tLn ons fice in the group and that off i-
cers are "democratically elected"
Petitions are now being ac- by the membership of the group.
cepted for positions on the En- Sharpe said the LYL's interest
gineering Honor Council. being the study of Marxism and
Petitions can be turned in to Leninism members of the Com-
members of the council or left munist Party might join the group
at 221 West Engineering Bldg. but the fundamental purpose of
The Honor Council consists the organization was to study the
of eight members whose duties teachings of Marx and Lenin.
are both educational and ad-
ministrative. They familiarize "The question of Communists
all new students with the ideals in LYL is no criterer" Sharpe
and workings of the Honor said, "one only has to have an
System and decide upon rthe interest in carrying out one or
guilt and punishment of the vi- more of the policies of LYL."
olators. The group is concerned with en-
cornuraring and providing onnor-

tunities for its members to study The defense of LYL is based or
Marxism." their belief that an attempt to say
3) Sharpe said there is a nat- the organization is dominated by
ural "relationship" between the the Communist Party is subter-
CP since both the LYL and the fuge whereby the SACB sets up its
Communist Party were both Marx- own political ideas as criterea for
ist organizations. political orthodox.
Since the LYL is orientated to The final verdict no matter
the role of the labor movement, which way it turns out will in all
according to Sharpe, on this basis probability be contested by one
there is a fraternal feeling be- of the parties involved and will no
tween the tw'o organizations. doubt resolve in a long, drawn out
4) The LYL condemns what it battle.

terms "guilt by parallism" to the
Government's charge that the or-
ganization has never knowingly de-
viated from the line of the Com-
munist Party.
And so with the Government's
charges and the LYL's counter-
charges the case continues to be
heard before the Security Activi-
ties Control Board.
The basis for the Govern-
ment's case seems to be that
LYL is dominated and control-
led in every aspect by the Com-
munist Party and indeed is close-
ly affiliated with the Party.

The decision by the courts may
make it one of the most signifi-
cant cases in the annals of Amer-
ican jurisprudence.
We feature-1
Ladies' styling

Styled haircuts
Sparkling shines
715 N. University

r"

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14 to 16 weeks. Fastest and quickest
system. Increase your salary.
in 6 WEKS -
TYPING OPTIONAL,
Schools in over 400 cities. Over 150,000 graduates.
Free employment service. One low fee. No extra tuition,
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
Pounded 1915 Phone NO 8-7831 State end Williams St..

s

s --

By DEBRA DURCHSLAG
' In speech department jargon,
Operation 4006 means practical
radio broadcasting.
From 3:15 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.
today, students will duplicate the
VRC Provides
Intensive Care
For Neurotics
(Continued from Page 1)
tally deficient, epileptic and crim-
inal insane. In addition to State
facilities, mental care is provided
by counties, universities, and
groups within the State.
In connection with University
Hospital and the State Veterans
Trust Fund, Michigan is able to
maintain a unique institution in
the public mental health field.
A squat building behind Univer-
sity Hospital is one of few hospit-
als that limits itself to intensive
psychiatric hospital treatment at
no expense. This Is the Veterans
Readjustment Center, an institu-
tion for the treatment of mentally
disturbed..
The Center was built in 1947
bry the State with funds appro-
priated by the Legislature out of
the Veterans Trust Fund. The
State directly supports the VRC,
but it is run by the University as
an integral. part of the University
medical center and has complete
access to medical facilities.
* * *
THE PRESENT building of the
VRC can accommodate 50 patients,
but has not always operated at
capacity because 'of staff limita-
tions. The Center also runs an out-
patient clinic which treats cases
of neuroses" which do not need
hospitalization as well as follow-
up treatments on discharged pa-
tients.
There are only two definite
restrictions on patients treated
at the Center: they must be vet-
erans of World War II or the
Korean conflict and Michigan
residents. However, this is a hos-
pital for neurotics, and only
those whom the doctors feel will
benefit from the non-restrictive
environment are, admitted or al-
lowed to remain.
In the public mental health field
the intensive hospital treatment
of the VRC is unusual. Dr. Moses
M. Frohlich, director of the Cen-
te', is a psychiatrist and psycho-
analyst, as are the two senior sup-
ervisors. The psychiatric staff is
completed by six doctors who are
residents in training.
This medical staff enables each
patient to receive psychothera-
peutic interviews at least three
times a week. The ratio of one doc-
tor to seven or eight hospital pa-
tients is in marked contrast to
the large public mental hospitals
such as the Eloise Institute, where
the staff averages one doctor to
every 280 patients.
Within an average of six
months, men who might otherwise
be dependents of the state are able
to take up a normal life through
the services of the Veterans Re-
adjustment Center.

operations of a commercial sta-
tion through a typical program-
ming day. Station breaks for ad-
vertising, strict time schedules
and standard program procedures
will be followed just as in net-
work productions.
- * -
THE ONLY deviation from com-
mercial station programming will
be to shorten each production to
one-third the timie of the actual
broadcast. Programs will run from
five minutes for a 15-minute news-
cast to 20 minutes for an hour
drama'.
Although following standard
program types,such as breakfast
shows, soap-operas, and quiz
programs, Operation 4006 uses
original student scripts. Direct-
ing, producing, casting and
studio work will all be handled
by students. Every student in
radio classes will participate in
the day's programs.
* * *
PROGRAMS will eminate from
six studios, including the hall for
the inquiring reporter broadcast,
on the fourth floor of Angell Hall.
No television programs will be in-
cluded in this 'semester's Opera-
tion 4006 due to the department's
television work on WPAG-TV.
Operation 4006 is a closed sta-
tion exercise with programs being
broadcast to Rm. 4203 Angell Hall.
The public is invited to listen to
the .student project.
Harrington Cites
Health Education
It is our job in health educa-
tion to give the public an appre-
ciation of the meaning of good
health so they will fight to have
it and insist on it as a natural
right," Mark Harrington, presi-
dent of the National Tuberculosis
Association said here yesterday.
"Deaths as a measure of tu-
berculosis control are a dangerous
index," he said. "We must think
of the patients who are sick with
the disease, most of whom will
live and will be in need of total
rehabilitation."
'To Speak Today
Prof. Sydney Chapman, visit-
ing professor of solar and terres-
trial physics, will speak at 4'10
p.m. today at the Observatory on
"Theories of the Aurora and Geo-
magnetic Disturbance."
FARMERS
PRODUCE
MARKET
SALES FROM FARMER
DIRECTLY TO CONSUMER
Open Every Wed. and Sat.
8 AM. to 3 P.M.
DETROIT STREET
between Catherine & Kingsey

- .

Sallade cited accomplishments
of the Ann Arbor Republican Par-
ty as the new fire station and the
Maynard Street carport. He also
mentioned progress towards a new
city hall and an effort to study the
problems of recreation and hous-
ing in the city.

.

in

Honor Gale

C

At Dine
Tonight
Esson M. Gale, director of the
University International Center,
will be guest of honor at a testi-
monial dinner celebrating his 69th
birthday at 7 p.m. today in the
Union ballroom.
Counselor to some 1,050 foreign
students on campus, Gale has help-
ed many students with financial
and immigration problems. Gale
is planning to retire within the
next few months after 11 years
here.
TOASTMASTER for the occa-
sion will be John J. Danhof, '07,
Detroit lawyer and former class-
mate of Gale. Arthur Pound, '07,
will be the main speaker. Pound is
former editor of the "Atlantic
Monthly" and a former classmate
of Gale.
Also seated at the main table
will be Regent Roscoe O. Boni-
steel and Mrs. Bonisteel, Uni-
versity President Harlan H. Hat-
cher and Mrs. Hatcher, Univer-
sity Vice-President Marvin L.
Neihuss and Mrs. Neihuss and
Professor Emeritus J. RaleighI
Nelson, founding director and
counselor of the University In-
ternational Center.
A testimonial will be presented
to Gale on behalf of the Univers-
ity. The class of '07, the Ann Ar-
bor community, the Orientalists
and Old China Hands, the National
Association of Foreign Students
Advisors, the staff and students at
the International Center and oth-
er friends will also honor Gale in
testimonials.
. The invocation and benediction
will be given by tlie Rev. Dewitt
Baldwin, head of Lane Hall Stu-
dent Religious Association.
J. Paul Sheedy* Switche
Because He Flunked

vv ua su6 aaab aa aau xrsvrau uag v,} ,iva

SAMUEL is best known for his
analysis of anti-Semitism in "The
Great Hatred" and essays on Pal-!
estine in "Harvest in the Desert."
His most recent book, titled "Level
Sunlight" is a series of essays on
the history of the State of Israel
and its achievements, problems
and relationship to America.
In .addition to his own pub-
lished works, Samuel is widely
known for his translations of "
classic works of Yiddish litera-
ture. "The World of Sholem
tAi.eichem," "The Prince of the
Ghetto," and a collection of
short stories of Sholem Aleichemor ex
are among works he has trans-
lated. holiday tir
The lecture, open to the public,
is one in a series of programs to be'
presented by the Hillel Founda- G O E
tion and the Beth Israel Center on
various phases of Jewish religion I
and - culture.
First Election
Get Home So'
can't cut vacat
Bid n ou ce the fun, too. S
first hat has been thrown safely stretch
The back to schoolo
in the Ann Arbor political ring a 25% of
for the spring city council elec- two r more fr
tions to be held in April. on trips of 00
Mrs. Louise G. Cain, wife of ou can each s
School of Natural Resources train.., then,
Chairman Stanley Cain, announc-
ed her candidacy for alderman in Consult You
the sixth ward on the Democratic of De
ticket at a city-wide party con-
clave held Thursday. EAS
Now a research assistant in
pollen analysis at the University,
Mrs. Cain was president of theI
Michigan League of Women Vot-
ers from 1951 to 1953 and a mem-
ber of the state vocational reha-
bilitation commission in 1951-
1952.
ed to Wildroot Cream-Oil
The Finger-Nail Test
o .
v
} ti e
.s in a stew about his hare until his paw n
your girl left you. Now, lettuce look at
y huggin', smart rabbits foot it down to

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oner and Surer. Weather and holiday traffic delays
ion time. The train trip with your crowd is part of
So are those swell dining car meals! And you can
vacation's end to the very last party, yet still get
on time!
the Coach Fare by traveling home and back with
iends on Group Economy Plan Tickets. They're good
miles or more. Gather a group of 25 or more and
ave 28% traveling long-distance together on the same
returning as a group or individuaily.
r Local Railroad Ticket Agent Well in Advance
eparture Date for Detailed Information
TERN RAILROADS
.. : . Y A h . .X . : . .} " : : :" :: ;a " : :i4

"

I

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arcade jewelry
shop

December 8, 1953

Dear Sir:

, An

The Omega Automatic had its beginning many years ago. In fact since the
eighteenth century, horologists havebeenstrying to perfectraself-winding watch. Their early
efforts were called "jerk-winding" watches because the jerking motion of a man's walk
kept them going.
More than a score of years ago Omega designed and marketed a self-winding wrist
watch worthy of the name Omega. A name which for more than a century had established
tself as the aristocrat of fine watches.
In a few short years, this automatic movement become the talk and challenge
of the industry. So remarkable were the results that today the Omega automatic is the
world's most copied watch. We believe such imitation of design to be a very sincere form
of flattery.
Olt is our opinion that you cannot justly select your next watch without knowing

I"

Here's a sad cotton tale: poor Paul wa
wrote: "I ear you got a bun on because
the bre'r facts. To get in on the bunny

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