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December 04, 1953 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'I PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY,DECEMBER C,?W3

PAGE EIGHT FRIDAY, DECEMBER 44 ?95

SPORTS ENTHUSIAST:
Civil Law Expert To Retire In June

By FREDDI LOEWENBERG
Forty-three years ago a young
lawyer quit his Chicago practice
to join the University law school
faculty.
Prof. Ralph W. Aigler, who will
terminate his teaching career in
June, has since become known as
one of the outstanding civil law
professors at the University and
the "Dean" of the Western Con-
ference, a title earned as Michi-
gan's faculty representative.
* *.*
ENTERING THE business world
immediately after graduation from
-high school, Prof. Aigler looked to-
ward banking as his life's work.
But boyhood ambitions and a talk
with his brother, then a law stu-
dent at the University, led him to
Michigan first to get his law de-
gree and later to begin a long ca-
reer as professor of civil law.
Accepting a job in Chicago af-
ter graduation, he remained in
general practice only three
years.aLaw as a practice didn't
suit him. Serving the needs of
a client made him take one side
or the other, while he had the
interest in the law as it was or
should be.
"The law teacher looks at the
law not as an advocate but as a
student," he explained, "and can
go one step further and ask him-
self what the law ought to be."
So in 1910, on the advice and re-
commendation of the then Law
School Dean Henry M. Bates, he
joined the faculty and has been
affiliated with the University ev-
er since.
INVOLVEMENT WITH the Big
Ten came about by accident. Re-
lating the story, Prof. Aigler re-
called that when Michigan with-
drew from the Conference in 1908,
there was much debate on the
question of re-entry. Finally when
a public debate was held by the
Union, Prof. Aigler was chosen
to argue for joining because of
his previous endorsement.
The debate attracted a great
deal of, attention and when a
positio~n became vacant on the
athletic board, Prof. Aigler was
SL Approves
Committee
Appointments
Students named by Student Leg-
islature's cabinet to head up SL
committees for the present term
were approved Wednesday by the
Legislature.
Hank Berliner,''56, was named
chairman of the Campus Action
Committee. Larry Harris, '56, and
Tom Bleha, '56, will head the Cul-
ture and Education and Human
Relations Committees respectively.
* * *
INTERCOLLEGIATE Relations
Committee will be chaired by Dick
McKenzie, the International Re-
lations Comnittee by Cris Reifel,
'55, and the Public Relations Com-
mittee by Marc Jacobson, '55.
SL Treasurer Vic Hampton,
'54, will head the Finance Com-
mittee and Book Exchange
Board. Chairman of the Cin-
ema Guild board will be Dave
Gross, '56.
Coordinator of the Executive
Wing will be Donna Netzer, '56,
while Hank Crapo, '54, will be SL
Comptroller and Nan Howe, '56,
Secretariat Head.
Fred Hicks, '54, SL vice-presi-
dent will chair the special tempor-
ary committee which plans a study
of SL's constitution and structure.
Other members of the committee

include Bert Braun, '54, Leah
Marks, '55L, Bob Neary, '54BAd.,
Steve Jelin, '55, Bob Ely, '54E,
Ruth Rossner, '55, Janet Netzer,
'54 and Ned Simon, '55.
Neary and Jelin will also sit on
the University Lecture Committee
which approves speakers who
have been requested to speak on
campus.
Shopping Days
Until Christmas
CHRISTMAS GIFT
CHECK LIST
Rings ... Bracelets
Jeweled Pins ... Earrings
Cuff Links ... Tie Bars
Jewel Boxes ... Compacts
Lighters ... Cases
Necklaces ... Bar Pins
Handbaas ... Billfolds

Ban Removal
Plans Given
To Regents
(Continued from Page 1)
Another reported reason for de-
lay in Regents' action has been
to enable further study of the
parking problem in the campus
area.
* * *
A THOROUGH study of cam-
pus-area parking was made by the
business operations committee of
the University Senate last March.
The committee report showed
there are 968 restricted park-
ing spaces on campus in addi-
tion to 425 open spaces for a to-
tal of 1,393 available off street
parking slots.
In the University Hospital area
there were found to be a total of
1,268 spaces, 408 of them restrict-
ed and 860 open.
SOME 2,500 permits for restrict-
ed parking spaces are issued to
faculty and full-time employes of
the University each year, that is
2.5 cars for every space. Because
of considerable turnover in park-
ing during the course of a day the
problem here is not acute.
The report estimated that be-
tween 3,200 and 3,500 cars be-
longing to campus people (not
students) are parked in the
campus area daily.
Conclusions of the survey indi-
cated no immediate solution to the
parking problem.
A petition this fall to the Ann
Arbor City Council to close all or
portions of five streets in the
campus area signed by 11 Uni-
versity and city administrators
was temporarily withdrawn from
the council's agenda at their
Oct. 5 meeting.
At that time University Vice-
President Wilbus K. Pierpont said
the University has an interest in
closing the streets. He said the
University is interested in co-op-
erating with the city in controlling
traffic in the campus area and in
some cases in providing additional
parking areas.
The streets involved were all lo-'
-cated on the north, east and south-{
ern fringes of the campus area.

Youthful 'U' Hospital Patients
Play, Rest in Galens Workshop

Daily-Betsy Smith
PROF. RALPH W. AIGLER
. . . 43 years with the University

selected to fill it, two years lat-
er becoming chairman of the
board. When Michigan return-
ed to the Big Ten, he was ap-
pointed faculty representative.
Athletics, his main avocation,
provides him "wit something to
do other than deal with the law."
Prof. Aigler has known personally
virtually all Michigan athletes,
wfth his enthusiasm for. football
stemming from an interest in the
activities of young people. An ar-
dent fan, he follows .the football!
team to most of its games.
HIS SPORTS interests are not
limited to football, however. A
friend of Branch Rickey's, he has
passes to all National League
baseball parks.
His students know him for his
compelling classroom manner. He
has the habit of stating facts
without giving the answer in such
a manner that the student will be
motivated to go look it up in the
library.
* * *
TUNING TO his philosophy,
Prof. Aigler stated that one should
do the best he can. "I do believe
that one should hold to his pre-
sent course until he is reasonably
sure that things will be better if
one were to travel another road,"
he continued.
Prof. Aigler takes pride in the
fact that he was largely res-
ponsible for the creation of Mi-
chigan's Forty Year Marketable

Title Act, which has since been
adopted by three other states.
An author, he has written case
books, law review articles and
is an authority on the legal doc-
trines which govern those who
find things.
Other interests include travel-
ing and reading in the field of
law. He especially likes to go to
California. Often accepting vaca-
tion teaching jobs, he recently
spent a summer at Harvard.
Termed by one of his friends
"the youngest man of his age I
know," Prof. Aigler doesn't be-
lieve in glorifying the good old
days. "When you start talking
about the good old days, it is a
sign that you are getting old," he
concluded.
ROTC Cadets Set
To See Tank Plant
Several Army ROTC cadets will
leave today for a tour of the Ford
Livonia Tank Plant arranged by
the military science department.
The tour, designed to acquaint
cadets with varied activities of the
Army, will include a detailed study
of the tank assembly line which is
in the process of greatly modifying
the T-48 tanks. Cadets will also
view the Army Engineers construc-
tion of a warehouse for "moth-
balling" the machines used in the
actual production of the T-48 tank.

Annual Drive
For Funds
This Week
goal of $6,500
Set by Society
Rm. 9005, University Hospital,
isn't the tidy sort of room you
generally expect to find in a hos-
pital, but the happy voices of busy
children blend pleasantly with the
whine of a jigsaw and sander.
Here in the Galens workshop
young patients .spend many of the
long hours and days of recupera-
tion and waiting in interesting,
useful and active pursuits.
A FULL-TIME therapist, Har-
vey Katchan of the University
Hospital school, supervises and
guides the activities of the young-
sters in the shop.
"'The first thing to be remem-
bered is that sick children don't
like being sick. Unlike some
adults, sickness very quickly
bores the child," Katchan warn-
ed.
The Galens shop uses every pos-
sible means to prevent this bore-
dom. Equipment includes looms,
Jigsaws, a sapd table, a drill press,
a sander, pottery kilns, and num-
erous stores of "raw materials"
for use with the machinery or
other arts and crafts work.
* * *
GALENS Medical Society is sole
supporter for the shop, and de-
rives funds from its annual tag
days at Christmas time. Mem-
bers of the honorary medical so-
ciety will man buckets during this
year's drive today and tomorrow
to try and meet their goal of
$6,500.
The society also sponsors an
annual Christmas party for
children in the hospital and do-
nates money for the purchase of
children's books and games used
in the hospital.
A garden is carefully planted'
and cultivated on a sunporch ad-
joining the workshop during the
summer time and a small collec-
tion of animals entertains the pa-
tienst.
"Sparky," a pet racoon donated
by a former patient, is the most
favored animal in the shop, along
with a rabbit. A hive of bees in
glass containers is safely observed
during warm periods by the
youngsters.

t

"SPORTY" ASSISTS A YOUNG PATIENT WITH A PROJECT

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STUDENT
INTERNATIONAL
TRAVEL
ASSOCIATION
Summer Tours
Area Representative,
Carol Collins on Canipus
FRIDAY, DEC. 4
11:30 to 4:30
Women's League Lobby

DAILY
PHOTO
FEATURE
Story by
Wally Eberhard
Pictures Courtesy
Galens Society
and
University Hospital

II

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'1

YOUNGSTER USES GALEN LOOM

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visua I arts
music
cretiv wrtig

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CLAY FIGURE TAKES SHAPE IN GALENS SHOP PATIENT USES MATERIALS FURNISHED BY GALENS

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