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December 02, 1953 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-12-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE ZTGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER , 1953

I

Plant Dept. IT'S JOULUPUKKI IN FINLAND:
Picks, Cuts Many Different Custom

s Surround Yule Celebration

Y By SHIRLEY KLEIN and. all the lights went on," she on Yule logs and even presented
Although Christmas cards and said. as symbolic gifts.
Santa Claus seem traditional to * * a ~ * * * t
For the past three weeks, the Americans, discussions with stu- MEXICAN children are already AMERICANS are indebted to
plant department's grounds crew dents from other countries reveal celebrating Christmas nine days the Dutch for Santa Claus. The
has been working on the task of a variety of customs that make beforehand. They utilize the pinta, name is a corruption of the Dutch
choosing and cutting the pine and Christmas a universal as well as a large clay container filled with "Saint Nicholas" who, dressed in
fir trees that will decorate the personal holiday. gifts and candy and suspended a cardinal robe and hat, rides a
campus during the Christmas sea- from the ceiling. At the appropri- white steed through the towns. He
son. Germany, the originator of the ate time, the pinta is broken and is accompanied by a servant who,
In cooperation with the United Christmas tree, begins its celebra- presents are scattered for all. frightens the children by telling
States Forestry Service on Peach tion early in December by lighting Food is central to Christmas them they will be stuffed in his
Mountain near Dexter, the plant candles every Sunday. Annette in Norway as it is in most bag and carried off if they do not
department selects the 150 trees to Brinkmann, exchange student countries. Eigil Aas, Grad, com- behave.
be used, at a cost of $400 for ththe cfrom Germany, can remember mented that in the old days so Finland's version of Santa
lot. They will be set up in various the children on Christmas eve many cookies were made for Claus is called Joulupukki, ac-
departments, dormitories, and in clean and expectant, waiting out- Christmas that they lasted until-~_
front of President Harlan Hatch- side the Christmas room for the Easter. The feast there begins on
er's house, the Union, the League, t " to see if Jesus had been Christmas Eve and lasts for 13
the University Hospital and other edays.
clt nlIsh

cording to Ahti A. Lohivesi,
Grad. Finland lore places Mr.
Claus in a Lapland toy factory,
making presents for all Finnish
boys and girls. "Otherwise, our
Santa is much like yours," Lo-
hivesi said.
The names for Christmas differ
nearly as much as the customs do.
Hungarians call their day of cel-
ebration "Adam and Eve's Day."
The shortening of Christmas to
"Xmas" comes from the Greek let-
ter Chi which is written as X. The
k has also been said to represent
the cross.
our argus
as "gift gallery"

.,

BOB McMASTERS PRACTICES CHIPPING IN FRONT OF TH
Former Cadies ere on S

By JIM DYGERT
Those students often seen
swinging golf clubs on the lawn in
front of the big yellow house at
1026 Oakland are not just chop-
ping weeds.
They are Standish-Evans Schol-
ars practicing their favorite game,
a game they learned as caddies be-
fore enrolling at the University.
SCHOLARSI4PS donated by
the Western Golf Association and
the Detroit District Golf Associ-
ation are responsible for the Mich-
igan chapter of the Standish-Ev-
ans Scholars. A group that now
numbers 26, the Scholars realized
the beginning of a formal organi-
zation a year ago around a nuc-
leus of 16.
This, their second year as an
organization, has been high-
lighted by the donation of a
three-story structure by the
DDGA. Known as the Standish-
Evans House, the dwelling has
room for 35 Scholars plus Mr.
and Mrs. Gerald Waltz, resident
advisors.
Last year Standish-Evans jump-
ed off to a good start by taking
third place in the Independent
League of intramural sports. In-
dividual standouts were not un-
common either. Bud Stevens, '57A
was a member of the varsity links
squad; Bob McMasters, '56E,
played freshman golf; Bobb Har-
dies, '56, captured the all-campus
bridge title; and president Roland

Zagnoli, '55P, was named class
representative to the students'
group of the American Pharma-
ceutical Association.
THIS YEAR, with the increase!
in membership, the Standish-
Evans 'Scholars havehset their aims
much higher, not only in sports,
but in other activities as well. The
main motive behind their spirit
is a desire to justify the opportu-
nities given them by the WGA
and the DDGA.

Self-government consisting of
an exectuive board elected by all
the members and committees
appointed by the executive board
has been set up to further this
purpose.

campus buildings. ' "After reading the Bible, father In Czechoslovakia the story is
* * jgave out presents and all the com- slightly different with the day be-
ACCORDING to Samuel Wylie, pany had dinner together. At fore Christmas being a fast day.
grounds crew foreman, the trees Midnight mass, everyone sang in the Ukraine and Yugoslavia
-Daily--Malcolm Shatz are chosen for their durability and and the church was dark with only grain plays an important part in
E STANDISH-EVANS HOUSE height. Only trees whose needles one candle burning. The priest the Christmas celebration. Wheat,
will not fall are picked. The trees then proclaimed Christ's birth, rye and other grains are scattered
range from two feet to 15 feet
chola " shi in height with the two-footers be-
ing used for table decorations at
dormitory parties and the 15-foot
ing over 20 colleges and univers- trees for display at the Hospital
ities, making it the largest schol- and Lane Hall.
arship program supported by in- The plant department's elec-
dividual contributions in the trical division will handle all the pJI IS 4 A
United States. Individual dona- lighting of outside trees, includ-
tions by members of golf clubs ing those in front of the Gen-
that belong to the WGA provide eral Library and Lloyd House
the capital for the program. in the West Quadrangle. with GIFTS from Staeb & Muss
An applicant must have been All the work is expected to be
a caddie in good standing for at completed next week and-the trees o help the shopper, m a. ae suggest
least two years at a member club will be taken down shortly aftere-
of the WGA New Year's Day. Neckwear Jewelry
::::>o;;>o o <;;;;:> o o<;;;;;;;>omo o Shirts Hosiery
Pajamas Pocketbooks
Sport Shirts oa , Handkerchiefs
Robeso┬░ Warm Jdckets
Sweaters d Belts-Suspenders
ea b Scarfs Raincoats I
Gloves Overcoats
Hats Suits, Topcoats
ALL GIFTS APPROPRIATELY BOXED
Thas year, more than ever before, it is smart
l 34to start your Christmas shopping early.
V~fSTOR E H OURS DA ILY 9 A.M. to 5:30 P.M.
MONDAYS until Christmas 9 A.M. to 8:30 P.M.
'THE DOWNTOWN STORE FOR MICHIGAN MEN"
O p e n da il y 2 t o 9 :3 0 P .M .
c3715 JACKSON ROAD 309 South Main
"'WE SERVE TO SERVE AGAIN"
cscsc> asoooeoncnc_ co c> <®> :

reaiure in
Christm4

i.

s

/

At the top of the organization
is president Zagnoli, unanimous-
ly re-elected to his post last spring.
Vice-president Fred Gerhardt,
'57D, heads the work detail that
keeps the house in top shape.
* * *
The group's activities have re-
sulted from the Standish-Evans
Scholarship program which makes
it possible for a caddie to attend
college. Originally initiated by the
famous 'Chich' Evans about 25
years ago for the WGA, the pro-
gram has spread to include small-
er groups such as the DDGA
where James Standish pioneered
the idea,
The scholarship program now
includes 156 Scholars represent-

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