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December 02, 1953 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-12-02

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1953

I

TRADITIONAL MUSIC, CAROLS:
Christmas Season To Feature Four Concerts

CARS 'THE COMING THING':
Horses No Longer Found on Campus

By NAN SWINEHART
This year's Christmas season will
be highlighted by four concerts:
the "Messiah," Dec. 5 and 6; the
University Choir, Dec. 10; the Chi-
cago Symphony Orchestra, Dec.
13 and the Christmas sing, Dec. 12.
Considered by many an essen-
tial part of the Yuletide season,
Handel's Christmas oratorio, "Mes-
siah," has a long history. Parts of
it were presented as far back as
1878 by the Choral Union under'
the sponsorship of the University
Musical Society.
Over the years the perform-
ance has ranged from portions of
the musical piece to the present
performance of the entire work
with guest soloists. This year four
singers not previously heard here,
Maud Nosler, Carol Smith, Walter
Fredericks and Norman Scott, will
appear in the solo roles.
MISS NOSLER, soprano, is
widely known for her work in the
oratorio. She has sung with many
groups throughout the country in-
cluding the Apollo Club and Swed-
ish Choral Society of Chicago, the'
Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the
Bach Choir of St. Louis and the
6t. Louis Symphony.
Miss Smith, contralto, has
performed in opera with orches-
tra, in recital and in oratorio.
Among roles she has sung are

E
I

Ann Arbor is no longer a place
' for horse enthusiasts.
For a sight or even a whiff of
their favorite animals, local eques-
trians must turn to riding stablest
or private farms.
Horses, sleuthing revealed, just
aren't to be found within the city
limits. Every source contacted
brushed off the horse-hunt with a'
"We don't keep any here, but you
might try so-and-so's farm out-
side town, or the stables."
EVEN IN DETROIT, where at
the turn of the century 40,000
horses provided the city with its
chief means of transportation,
their number has dwindled to 350.
Ann Arbor has a total of 35, all
maintained for leisure riding pur-
poses at the Huron River Stables.
While the Detroit police force
keeps fifty horses for use at
Belle Isle and the Bethune Sta-
tion, mostly Morgans and Ten-
nessee Walkers, Ann Arbor po-
lice limit themselves to automo-
bile transportation. "Let's face
it," one member commented,
"cars are the coming thing."
Even farmers in this area re-

ported their horse population is tion to the campus. Dave Car-
diminishing. Tractors, they agree, penter, '56, pointed out that a
are much less expensive to main- vast saving in gas could result
tai and, according to one, "rare- from riding to classes and dates
ly get sick." on horseback.
* * * When questioned about adding
DETROIT can claim only one horses to the campus population,
operating commercial stable to- Cynthia Stone, '56, added an en-
day, which rents out its stock of thusiastic "Yes!" Pedaling up
38 animals to junkmen, vegetable Washtenaw Avenue, she pointed
salesmen and fishmongers. out, "Horses take a lot less up-
A random student survey keep than bikes. And even if
showed that in some respects they're dirtier, the change would
horses could be a valuable addi- be worth it in the long run."

MAUD NOSLER NORMAN SCOTT
.. . soprano ... bass

WALTER FREDERICKS CAROL SMITH
...tenor ... contralto

music SHOPS
THE BEST IN RECORDED MUSIC
205 EAST LIBERTY 211 SOUTH STATE
NOrmandy 2-0675 NOrmandy 8-9013

Carmen, Amneris and Ortrud
and she has been heard with the
New York City Orchestra, San
Carlo and other companies.
Walter Fredericks, tenor, began
his career in opera in 1947 and has
sung with the San Francisco Op-
era Company and with opera com-
panies' in Philadelphia, Los An-
geles, Pittsburgh, New Orleans and
New York.
Norman Scott, bass, is the fourth
member of the quartet. For two
seasons he has sung leading bass
roles at the Metropolitan Opera
and has been guest soloist with
orchestras which include the New
York Philharmonic and the Min-
neapolis Symphony.
Performances of the "Messiah"
are scheduled for 8:30 p.m. Dec.:
5 and 2:30 p.m. Dec. 6 in Hill
Auditorium.
* * *
ALSO COMING to Ann Arbor at E
Christmas time is the Chicago
Symphony Orchestra with Fritz
Reiner conducting.
Reiner is' the sixth conductor

Application
and
Passport Photos
$1.50
24-HOUR SERVICE
IVORY PHOTO
606 S. Main at Madison
NO 8-8413

of the symphony sincei
62 years ago. He has sp
of his conducting car
the Pittsburgh Symph
part with the Metropol
era. This year is his fi
son as permanent cond
the Chicago Symphony
Reiner previously appe
in 1950 when he was g
ductor for the Chicago S
The orchestra ownsi
Orchestra Hall, in Chica
was built by contribution
from 10 cents to $25,000f
8,500 contributors. In Ch
ing its 28 week season th
tra gives 113 concertsv
elude a series of 28 Thurs
ing and Friday aftern
certs, 12 Tuesday aftern
certs, 16 Popular Satur
noon concerts and 12 yo
ple's concerts on Tuesd
noons.
The group will perforr
p.m.,- Dec. 13 at Hill A
with a program that wi
The Brandenburg Conce
by Bach, Symphony No
Minor by Mozart, "Ti
spiegel" by Strauss, "Ibe
by Debussy and Overture
hauser" by Wagner.

its origin ANOTHER ADDITION to Ann
pent part Arbor's musical Christmas season
eer with will be the Christmas Sing, at 7:30
ony and p.m. Dec. 12 at Hill Auditorium.
itan Op- The program is sponsored by
irst sea- the Citizens of Ann Arbor, a
uctor for group made up of 11 Ann Arbor,
. residents.
eared here Directed by Gail W. Rector, of
uest con- the University Musical Society,
symphony. the program will include "The Na-
its home, tivity Story," "T'was the Night
igo, which Before Christmas," and tradition-
as ranging al Christmas music and carol sing-
from some ing by the audience assisted by
icago dur- local choral groups.
he orches- "The Nativity Story and "T'was
which in- the Night Before Christmas" will
day even- feature a cast of city residents and
loon con- University students. Background
noon con- music will be sung by a combined
day after- choral group made up of Ann Ar-
oung peo- bor and University High School A
lay after- Capella Choirs, Lyra Male Chorus,
the St. Thomas Boys Choristers,
m at 8:30 The Ped-Ford Chorus and the
uditorium University of Michigan Men's Glee
ill include Club.
rto No. 3 Fourteen different carols will be
. 40 in G sung in addition to other Christ-
11 Eulen- mas music. Lester McCoy will lead
ria" Suite the singing and will encourage the
to "Tan- audience to join in. Community
church choirs will be scattered
i~or el "M A"tchesP

throughout the audience to bolster
audience singing.
THE UNIVERSITY Choir and
the Michigan Singers will hold
(heir concert at 8:30 p.m. on Dec.
10 at Hill Auditorium.
The program will be divid-
ed into two parts with the
first part featuring traditional
Christmas music and the second
the Bach "Magnificat." The
Michigan Singers will partici-
pate in the first part of the
program which will be largely
without accompaniment.
Michigan Singer soloists will in-
clude Perry Daniels and Mary Ann
Tinkham, '54SM. Singing solo
parts in the "Magnificat" will be
Mary Ellen Roosa, '55SM, Joan
Marie Dudd, '54SM and Charles
Wingert, '55.
Directed by Maynard Klein, the
program is open to the public,
free of charge.
Tickets for the Messiah are
priced at 50 and 70 cents and may
be obtained at the offices of the
University Musical Society in Bur-
ton Tower.
Symphony Orchestra tickets
priced at $1.50, $2, $2.50 and $3
may also be purchased there.
There is no admission charge to
the Christmas Sing.

y .:. FOR CHRISTMAS
STATIONERY GIFT BOXES
FOUNTAIN PENS
OFFICE FURNITURE
TYPEWRITERS
CALENDARS
Typewriters
All makes, Portable
and Standard.
Plain Cards Immediate delivery.
Photograph Albus Fountain Pens
otrap k A Sheaffer, Parker,
Scrap Books Esterbrook.
RUSTCRAFT CHRISTMAS CARDS
We imprint cards purchased here.
Since "JPhone
1908 IM-OURILL S NO 8-7177
314 South State Street
OPEN SATURDAY TILL 5 P.M.
.f5

4.

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0 COOK BOOKS

Children's Books
Stationery -- Games"-- Toys - Cards
A Fine Selection of Christmas Cards
OVERBECK BOOKSTORE
1216 South University
Phone NO 3-4436

By JOEL BERGER
Students can still find a ride
home for Christmas to almost
every place but Timbuctoo.
Placed directly in the middle of
the Union lobby is a large signup
board operated by the Union trav-
el service. Supervised by the stu-
dent offices, the board holds cards
for drivers and riders to sign and
a large map of the United States.
* s *
DRIVERS seeking passengers
for their Yuletide trip should sign
a blue card and drop it in the box
underneath the map, according
to Union councilman John Munn,
'54E. Red cards are provided for
prospective passengers.
Each day the boxes contain-
ing the two types of cards are
emptied and the date is placed
on each card. They are filed
alphabetically each day so that
riders and drivers are taken care
of on a first-come, first-served
basis.
When enough passengers have
been found for each driver, the
Union notifies him of the names
and telephone numbers of the pas-
sengers. The driver makes all fur-
ther arrangements.

WITH BETWEEN 40 and 50
per cent of all requests filled dur-
ing the service's four year exist-
ence, some weird things have hap-
pened.
Two years ago a driver head-
ing for Washington, D.C. with
four passengers in his convert-
ible ran into a heavy rainstorm.
IWhen he stopped to raise the
top lie found the mechanism
was broken. So the damp five
continued driving through the
rain for four hours, as there was
no shelter available.
Dogs have given some passen-
gers trouble in the past, too. Last
year a driver brought along a
junior-sized great dane weighing
about 60 pounds. Mistaking a
passenger's suede jacket for a
teething ring, the little "pup-dog"
commenced teething. Result-one
slightly chewed jacket.
A final touch to travel difficul-
ties came three years ago when
two quiet passengers were left
behind in a restaurant. The driv-
er told them after backtracking
50 miles: "You were so quiet I
didn't even realize you weren't in
the back seat."

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