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November 18, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ftri'G! S IX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1953

________________________________________________________________________ I

SL Agenda
Student Legislature will meet
at 7:30 p.m. in Strauss Dining
Room, East Quadrargle, to dis-
cuss the following topics:
By-Law Changes
Conclave Report
Motion for establishment of
an Anti-Discrimination Board
Announcement of Cinema
Guild sponsors
All interested students and
faculty members have been in-
vited by SL to attend the meet-
ing.
New Math Club
Officers Elected
The newly formed Undergradu-
ate Mathematics Club recently
elected officers.
President is James Stasheff, '56,
vice-president is Judy Stone, '57
and secretary-treasurer is Peggy
Crim, '57.

Meader Talks
On Academy
Appointments
Ann Arbor Congressman George
Meader yesterday announced the
procedure he will follow in making
appointments to the U.S. Military
and Naval Academies .next year.
Applicants will be required to
take both physical and mental
examinations in order to prove
qualification, and Meader stress-
ed that nomination "will be
made on the basis of merit rath-
er than friendship or political
favor."
Two vacancies at each academy
will be filled from the Second
Congressional District, with ap-
pointments to begin next July.
Application blanks, available at
libraries, schools, chambers of
commerce and other agencies
throughout the four-county dis-
trict, must be submitted to Mead-
er's Washington office not later
than Dec. 7.

PI

TI1

J4

NEWS

t

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
PROF. FREDERICK H. LAWSON TELLS ABOUT BRITISH
LAW EDUCATION METHODS
Barrister Cites Differences
In English, American Law

. I'

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1

Z3e
LUNCHES

ondo er
DINNERS

GOOD H U N T I N G IN, KO R E A - Members of
Navy contingent in Munsan, Korea, are silhouetted against twilight
sky as they head back to camp after bagging a pheasant.

By FREDDI LOEWENBERG
Law is taught in England pri-
marily as an undergraduate sub-
ject, according to Prof. Frederick
H. Lawson of Oxford University.
The English barrister, in Ann
Arbor to give a series of lectures,
noted several differences in legal
eudcations offered in the two
countries. He said that there are
no regular graduate law schools
as'in America but that the would-
be la.wyer serves as an apprentice
to learn his trade.
A SQLICITOR, who takes care
of the "business end" of the law,
has to serve, three years "in arti-
cles" after completing his school-
ing, he explained. Those without
undergraduate work have to serve
five years, according to Prof. Law-
son.
In contrast, a barrister who is
a specialist, needs a year "in
chambers" studying the law un-
der the guidance of a lawyer, the
attorney said.
The English separate the practi-
cal aspect from the academic, he
said. Englishmen do not study tax
or patent law in school but obtain
this knowledge from practical ex-
perience.
Players Group
To Meet Today
Student Players will hold its sec-
and general meeting of the semes-
ter at 7:30 p.m. today . In the
League.
Composed t students who are
interested in play production as
an avocation rather than a vo-
cation, the group considers itself
in a distinctive position.
"We're interested in the theater
as entertainment," Jim Brodheaft
'54, president of Student Players
said, "not as education." Studept
Players has opportunities for work
in acting as well as in stage work.
Next production of Student
Players will be -decided at today's
meeting. All those interested in
working on the production must
be present, according to Brod-
head.
City Seeks Action
On Buildingr Issue
Ann Arbor's city council decid-
ed late Monday night to get down
to legal brass tacks on the several
months old controversy involving
building permit fees for the new
senior high school and the new
Courthouse.
The council instructed the city
attorney to attempt through dis-
cussion with Board of Education
and Washtenaw county attorneys
to reconcile the existing difference
of opinion of the groups. If this
remains a stalemate he is to obtain
a declaratory judgement from the
courts on the questions at issue.
Hutchins To Speak
Lee Hutchins, president of a
Grand R a p i d s pharmaceutical
firm, will address members of the
Pharmaceutical Association at the
student branch of the Ameri-
can Pharmaceutical Association at
7:30 p.m. today in the League.

In undergraduate work, a simple
exam is given after half year to
determine whether the student is
qualified to continue in law. The
remaining exams are not given un-
til the third year.
*, * *
TURNING to differences in the
two legal systems, Prof. Lawson
said that even in appelate cases
in England no brief is submitted,
but oral argument is used.
lHagazine 'If'
offers Prize
For ANovelette
What will life in America be like
100 years from now?-
$1000 will be given by the aci-
ence fiction magazine, "If," for the
best novelette of approximately
10,000.words depicting future life
in America. There is a second prize
of $500 and seven $100 prizes for
runners up.
* *: *
THE SCIENCE fiction contest is
only open to full-time undergrad-
uate students in America and Can-
ada who have not written profes-
sionally.
Students may base their pre-
dictions on classwork, interpre-
tations of the trends today or
their own imagination.'
"The only limit for the plot,"
emphasized the editors of "If," "is
the author's own imagination. For
the story can take place in a cisy,
village or the country and may
deal with either a family group .or
single character.
Ideas, originality and plausibil-
ity, they stated, will be considered
more important than writing skil.
The deadline for the contest is
May 15, 1954 and the winners wiil
be afnounced the first week in
September.

C O N G R A T U L A T O R Y K I SS-Miss Greece, Alex-
andra Ladikoutrprepares to kiss cheek of France's Denise Perrier
after latter won "Miss World" title at London's Lyceum ballroom.

COCKTAIL LOUNGE
For Private Parties - Phone 935S3YP
HovRS: 11:00 A.M. to 2:00 A.M.
1322 Washtenaw on Highway 23
YPSILANTI, MICHIGAN

-11

MORE DAYS
If you wisb to select your
Personalizel
CHRISTMAS CARDS
SChester Roberts Gifts g
The Largest Collection in Ann Arbor
312 SOUTH STATE
50 cards for $1.25 and up
California Artist - Hallmark American Artist
'"When You Care Enough To Send The Very Best"

it

'ROCKING CHAIR CONSULTANT'--owen
D. Young, 79, former General Electric board chairmani, lights up
in Van Hornesville, N. Y. He is proud of sobriquet "rocking chair
consultant" because of his work for the Van Hornesville school.

THlE THAI WEIGH._--A sturdy baby is weighed in
the United Nations International Children's Fund headquarters of
the Chiengmal health project in Thailand. In background Is a
poster illustrating proper food and feeding times.

i

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NEW NEWS CHIEF
-Theodore C. Streibert, former-
ly of Mutual Broadcasting Sys-
tem, heads government's over-
seas information service, includ-
ing, Voice of America program.

A

D 0 G G Y . S U B I E C T - Colonel, of uncertain ancestry, is most cooperative in modeling for
sketch by Maureen Moccia, 41, for blue ribbon contest at New York's Children's Aid Society.(

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