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November 17, 1953 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-11-17

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN'DAILY

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 1?,1953

.

WORLD SCHOLARS:
Students from 128 Areas
In U.S. for 1952-53 Year

Some 33,671 foreign students-
more than ever before in history-
spent the 1952-53 academic year
studying in the United States.
The influx of world-wide schol-
ars hailed from 128 different na-
tions and dependent areas. Of 2,-
270 colleges, universities and pro-
fessional schools polled by the In-
stitute for International Educa-
tion, 1,149 reported at least one
foreign student enrolled.
* * *
A THIRD of the students were
from Asiatic countries while a
fourth came from some part of
western Europe. Another fourth
was from Latin America and one
seventh came across the boarder
Art Collection
Shown Here
The "Fleischman Collection of
American Paintings" an exhibition
sponsored by the Museum of Art
is now on display in the West Gal-
lery of Alumni Memorial Hall and
will be shown until Dec. 6.
The collection of paintings, bor-
rowed from Lawrence A. Fleisch-
man of Detroit, includes 33 paint-
ings, 11 of which are watercolors
by John Marin. Other artists rep-
resented are Stuart Davis, John
Sloan and Albert P. Ryder.

from Canada. The remainder came
from parts of Africa and Oceania.
With such highly diversified
origins the census pointed out
the impossibility of describing
any "typical" foreign student.
Humanities were among the
most popular subjects of study by
foreign students, the report indi-
cated. More than 21 percent were
studying liberal arts followed by
large groups studying engineering,
physical and natural sciences, so-
cial studies, medicine, business ad-
ministration, education and agri-
culture.
* * *
ENGINEERING attracted ap-
proximately 22 percent of the
Asian students while another 15
percent studied humanities. The
reverse was true of European and
Canadian students who can get
their technical training at home.
Latin American enrollment
was about equally divided be-
tween engineering and human-
ities. African students were
found to study the physical and
social' sciences, pointing up the
varied needs of that continent.
The average foreign student was
older than his American counter-
part, the report showed, and us-
ually had several years of practi-
cal experience before his arrival
in the U.S.

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Academic
Freedom
Week Opens'
(Continued from Page 1)
pamphlets, it is likely that no
literature will be made available
at today's forum.
Recording of proceedings of the
Internal Security Committee head-
ed by Sen. William E. Jenner (R-
Ind.) will be played from 4 to 6
p.m. tomorrow in the Union, as a
continuing part of Academic Free-
dom Week.
A second panel discussion on
"Have Legislative Investigating
Committees in Education contrib-
uted Favorably or Unfavorably to
Amedican Education?" will be held
at 7:30 p.m. Thursday in Audi-
torium A, Angell Hall.
Members of the panel include
Prof. Edwin Moise of the mathe-
matics department and Prof. Paul
G. Kauper of the Law School.
Students scheduled to participate
in the discussion will be Eugene
Hartwig, '55, Myron Sharpe, Grad.,
Jack Danielson, Grad., Donn Mil-
er, '54, and Dave Kornbluh, '54,
Prof. Algo Henderson of the
School of Education will moderate
for the panel.
SUNDAY an all-day conference
has been scheduled in the Union.
Beginning at 10 a.m. the session
will meet in Plenary session and
then break up into five discussion
sections.
Topics scheduled to be dis-
cussed are Congressional inves-
tigations, student rights, criteria
for judging teachers and teach-
ers' rights, American traditions
in academic freedom and secur-
ity and loyalty programs.
SL President Bob Neary, '54BAd.,
will call the five sectins back into
plenary session at 4 p.m. Sunday,
and at that time resolutions con-
cerning academic freedom may be
proposed.
The THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
in Ann Arbor
presents
ALVIN BOYD KUHN, Ph.D.
public lecture
RELIGION AS
ANTHROPOLOGY
Wednesday, November 18
8:00 P.M.
Michigan Union, Room 3B
Public Cordially Invited
EUROPE
If you wish to go with a small
group of congenial companions
with outstanding tour leadership,
we have a wide choice of summer
programs to meet your desires.
If you wish to go independently,
we have a special department to
assist you in planning and
completing your Atlantic passage
and foreig travel arrangements.
Thousands of students have trav-
eled abroad with us since 1919.
Send for descriptive folders.
INTERCOLLEGIATE TOURS
419 Boylston St., Boston, Mass.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construe-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday).
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1953
VOL. LXIV, No. 49
Notices
Restricted Parking Lot No. 10, Thay-
er and Washington Streets: To accom-
modate our guests who will be in at-
tendance at the Conference on Higher
Education, Lot No. 10 at the corner
of Thayer and Washington Streets will
be reserved for those attending the
Conference on Wed., Nov. 18.
Herbert G. Watkins, Secretary
Selective Service Examination. Stu-
dents taking the Selective Service Col-
lege Qualification Test on Nov. 19 are
requested to report to 100 Hutchins Hall
on Thursday morning at 8:30.
Messiah Orchestra. The University
Musical Society's "Messiah" Orchestra
will hold a full rehearsal Tuesday even-
ing, Nov. 17, at 8:30, on the stage of
Hill Auditorium. Members are request-
ed to enter via the rear doors of the
auditorium.
Choral Union. The regular full re-
hearsal will be held Tuesday evening,
Nov. 17, at 7 o'clock sharp in the
Choral Union rehearsal room in Angell
Hall.
Late permission for women students
who attended the Cleveland Symphony
concert on Sun., Nov. 8, will be no later
than 11:05 p.m.
Late permission for women students
who attended "Elizabeth, the Queen"
on Thurs., Nov. 12, will be no later than
11:30 p.m.
Late permission for women students
who attended the Trygvie Lie lecture
on Wed., Nov. 11, will be no later than
10:45 p.m.
Employment Opportunities. Repre-
sentatives of Cutler-Hammer, Inc of
Milwaukee, will interview February and
June graduates in Electrical, Industial,
and Mechanical Engineering for posi-
tions in manufacturing, industrial and
sales engineering on Nov. 20. For in-
terview appointment, telephone 635 or
2917.
Teachers for Guatemala, Central
America. Teachersare needed at the
elementary and secondary levels for the
American school in Guatemala, Cen-
tral America, for Jan., 1954, as well as
for the summer and fall sessions. In-
terested persons please contact Bureau
of Appointments for further informa-
tion, NO 3-1511, Ext. 2614.
PERSONNEL INTERVIEWS.
Thursday:
The City of Detroit Civil Service Com-
mission will have a representative on
campus Nov. 19 to interview February
and June gen and women graduates in
Bus. Ad., Liberal Arts, and the Social
Sciences for Technical Aid trainee po-
sitions in the fields of accounting, au-
diting, budgeting, personnel, public
housing, personal and real property a,.-
praising, survey and systems work, pub-
lic welfare, public health, civil defense,
and museum work. The Commission is
also interested in February and June
men and women graduates in the phys-
ical sciences, forestry, nursing, and pub-
lic health.
The Linde Air Products Co., Tona-
wanda, N.Y., will have a representative
at the Bureau of Appointments on Nov.
19 to talk with February and June, Bus.
Ad, and LS&A grads with engineering
background or aptitude for industrial
sales.
The National Carbon Co. (Division of
Union Carbide and Carbon), Fremont,
Ohio, will be here on Nov. 19 to inter-
view February and June men for sales
and Office Management positions Bus.
Ad. and LS&A students may make ap-
ponitments.
Friday:
The Washington National Insurance
Co., Evanston, Ill., will visit the campus
on Nov. 20 to talk with February Bus.
Ad. and LS&A graduates about posi-
tions as Traveling Group Field Repre-
sentatives. Both men and women may
schedule appointments.
The Eli Lilly & Co., Indianapolis, Ind.,
will have a representative here on Nov.
20 to interview Bus. Ad. grads about
their training program, Psycn. grads
with Master's degrees about a positon
as Training Studies Asst., and women
Bus. Ad. grads about Secretarial Trainee
positions. Junior men may also apply
for summer trainee positions.

Students wishing to schedule ap-
pointments to see these companies list-
ed above should contact the Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Administration
Building, Ext. 371.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS.
The Buffalo Forge Co., of Buffalo,
N.Y., a firm in the industrial heating
hiring Mechanical Engineers graduat-
ing in June. If there is enough inter-
est in the company, a representative
will come to the campus to interview
candidates.
Robert Hall Clothes, New York City,
is recruiting college graduates for their
Executive Management Training Pro-
gram. Students in Bus. Ad. and LS&A
are invited to apply.
The Connecticut State Service has an-
nounced an examination to fill Social
Worker positions. Residents of the state
who have an A.B. degree with courses
in sociology and psychology are eligible

to apply. The last date for filing appli-
cations is Nov, 26, 1953.
For applications and further informa-
tion about these and other employment
opportunities, contact the Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Administration
Building, Ext. 371.
Lectures
Lecture by Prof. Sydney Chapman,
auspices Departments of Astronomy,
Aeronautical Engineering, Physics, and
Geology, Tues., Nov. 17, 4 p.m., 1400
Chemistry Building. Topic, "Magnetic
Storms and Changes on the Sun."
Academic Notices
Seminar in Mathematical Statistics
Tues., Nov. 17, from 3-5 p.m., in 3201
Angell Hall. Professor P. S. Dwyer will
be the speaker.
Seminar in Complex Variables will
meet Tues., Nov. 17, at 3:30 in 3011 An-
gell Hall. Mr. James M. Osborn will
speak on "Doob's Proof of the Iversen-
Gross Theorem."
Logic Seminar, Tues., Nov. 17, at 4
p.m., in 2203 Angell Hall. Prof. Hao
Wang, of Harvard University and Bur-
roughs Corp., will speak "On Some New
Undecidable Propositions Generated by
Semantic Paradoxes."
Engineering Mechanics Seminar. H.
M. Hansen will speak on "Some Geomet-
ric Aspects of Conics" at 3:45 p.m. on
Wed., Nov. 18, in 101 West Engineering
Building. Refreshments will be served.
Doctoral Examination for William Levi
Cash, Jr., Education; thesis: "Relation
of Personality Traits to Scholastic Ap-
titude and Academic Achievement of
Students in a Liberal Protestant Sem-
inary," Wed., Nov. 18, East Council
Room, Rackham Building, at 4 p.m.
Chairman, H. C. Koch.
Concerts
University Woodwind Quintet, Nel-
son Hauenstein, Flute, Albert Luconi,
Clarinet, Lare Wardrop, Oboe, Ted Ev-
ans, French Horn, and Lewis Cooper,
Bassoon, with Colette Jablonski Rom-
zick, Pianist, will be heard in a concert
at 8:30 Tuesday evening, Nov. 17, in
the Rackham Lecture Hall. The pro-
gram will include Hartley's Divertis-
sement, Mortensen's Quintette, Rivier's
Petit Suite, Weis' Serenade, and Thuil-
le's Sextett, Op. 6, The general public
will be admitted without charge.
Exhibitions
Museum of Art, Alumni Memorial
Hall, Framing - Right and Wrong,
through Nov. 20; Michigan Printmakers
Society, through Nov. 18; Fleischman
Collection of American Paintings, Nov.
15-Dec. 6. Open 9-5 on weekdays; 2-5
Sundays. The public is invited.
Events Today
The University of Michigan Law
School presents the seventh in its ser-
ies of Thomas M. Cooley Lectures. Fred-
erick Henry Lawson, Professor of Com-
parative Law at the University of Ox-
ford, will speak on the general topic
"A Common Lawyer Looks at the Civil
Law." These lectures will be presented
November 16 to 20, at 4:15 p.m., Hutch-
ins Hall, Room 120.
Tues., Nov. 17-"The Form and
Sources of the Civil Law"
Wed., Nov. 18-"The Contribution of
Roman Law"
Thurs., Nov. 19-"The Advance Be-
yond Roman Law"
Fri., Nov. 20- Non-Roman Elements
in the Civil Law"
These lectures are open to the public,
free of charge.
Conference on Higher Education.
Theme: Implications of the Reports of
Three Commissions on Higher Educa-
tion.
Tues., Nov. 17, 2 p.m., Rackham Am-
phitheater, addresses by John D. Millet,
President, Miami University and former
Director of the Commission on Finan-
cing Higher Education; and Thomas R.
McConnell, Chancellor, Buffalo Uni-
(Continued on Page 4)

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Brown and Gold framed Eye
Glasses, Larkim, Optical case. Vacin-
ity, Univ. Hospital, Sun. Afternoon.
Call Ypsi 3588M after 6 p.m. )62A
LOST-Blue Hufzman bicycle No.
18541-C, license 2657. 545 Mosher.
WOMEN'S GLASSES-Plaid with white
frames. Renee Badner, 416 Mosher.
)61A
LOST - Woman's silver -watch on S.
Forest, of sentimental value, If
found, please call Kay Eggleston at
NO 3-5974. )63A
FOR SALE
ALL STUDENTS heed this 1940 Ford
2 door. $105. Huron Motor Sales.
Phone NO 2-3163. )156B
BRAND NEW Webeor phonograph and
tape recorder. Excellent buy. Call
NO 3-0521. Extension 627. )88B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxford-6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. 14B
SPECIAL Holiday Car-1946 Ford Sta-
tion Wagon. $439.75. Huron Motor
Sales. Phone NO 3-3163. )157B
CORONNA PORTABLE-Call NO 2-7326.
)56B
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Argus C 3 with case and flash. Like
new. $49.50. Purchase Camera Shop,
1113 So. Univ. )143B
CANARIES in full song. Parakeets, ex-
hibition quality. Also used :cages.
Mrs. Ruff ins, 562 S. 7th, NO 3-5330.
)144B
RADIO-PHONOGRAPH table combina-
tion, 3-speed changer. $60. NO 32554.
THANKSGIVING SPECIAL-1939 Chevy
2-door. $94.70. 'Huron Motor Sales.
Phone NO 2-3163. }158B
50 YARD LINE SPECIAL - 1949 Ford,
2 door, radio and heater $666.35.
Huron Motor Sales. Phone NO 2-3163.
)155B
MIDNIGHT blue tuxedo, size 36 regular.
Excellent condition. Ph. NO 2-0330.
)153B
TURKEY-TIME SPECIAL - 1941 Ply-
mouth,-$79.25. Huron Motor Sales.
Phone 2-3163. )1598
3 SPEED portable Hi-Fidelity phono-
graph. $75. Ph. NO 3-0190 after 8:00
p.m. )161B
FOR RENT
33 FT. HOUSE TRAILER - Sleeps six,
occupancy in one week. Phone NO
3-0965. )14C
READ AND USE
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

FURNISHED

CAMPUS APTS.

baths. One and two bedroom units for
men or women. For appointment
phone NO 3-8454. )13C
ROOMS FOR RENT
LARGE double room near campus.
Cooking privileges. Men students.
Phone NO 3-8454. )17D
PERSONAL
READ LIFE for little more (lc) than
the cost of your daily paper. Student
Periodical. Ph. NO 8-6007 )34F
HER MOST imperial highness, Empress
of all the Russias, Englands, and
Byzantines, declares spontaneous re-
joicing today, honoring the birthday
of his holiness, SAINT L. H., Patri-
archial See of all the Russias, Eng-
lands, and Byzantines. )36F

FOR RENT

TRANSPORTATION

WANTED-Riders to share expenses to
Pittsburgh or Washington, D.C. Call
346 Mosher Hall. )17G
TWO PASSENGERS for New York leav-
ing November 20 or 21. Call Nelson
Isada, NO 2-2051, 10 to 4 P.M. )20G
WANTED-A ride to Chicago, Thursday,
19th. Share expenses. Call NO 3-2653.
)19G
HELP WANTED
YOUNG LADY for part time work at
soda fountain. Swift's Drug Store,
340 S. State. Ph. NO 2-0534. )43H
MUSIC STUDENT -Wanted to sell
Hammond Organs and Chord Organs.
Must be able to play and demonstrate.
Part or full time position. Apply in
person to Mr. Hand. Grinnells, 323
S. Main. )45H
STUDENT to wait table for meals.
Phone NO 2-6422. )46H

A1

SChicago College of
OPTOMETRY

BUSINESS SERVICES

BUSINESS SERVICES
HOME TYPING SERVICE done at rea-
sonable rates. Call Mrs. Conner,
NO 2-7605. )13B
and efficient. Phone NO 8-7590. 830 S.
Main, )31
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono and T.V.
Fast and Reasonable bervice
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV.
"'Student Service"
1214 So. Univ., Ph. NO 8-7942
1%, blocks east of East Eng. )5I
WASHING, Finishpd Work, and Rand
Ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Ir ee pick-
up apd delivery. Ph. NO 2-9020. )21
HOME TYPING-All kinds by profes-
sional secretary. Fast, accurate ser-
vice. Reasonable- rates. Campus lo-
cation. 820 E. University. Phone NO
8-7391. )171
TYPING cirefully done. No job too
small. Phone NO 8-6075. 340 East Wil-
liams St. )191
BABY SITTING teenager willing to
work evenings, weekends. NO 2-9020.
)201

(Fully Accredited)
An outstanding college serving
a splendid profession.
Doctor of Optometry degree in
three years for students enter-
ing with sixty or more semester
credits in specified Liberal Arts
courses.
REGISTRATION FEB. 8
Students are granted profes-
sional recognition by the U. S.
Department of Defense and
Selective Service.
Excellent clinical facilities.
Athletic and recreational activi-
ties. Dormitories on the campus.
CHICAGO COLLEGE OF
OPTOMETRY
1851-C Larrabee Street
Chicago 14, Illinois

APPLICATION PHOTOGRAPHS while
you wait at SNIDER STUDIOS. 213
So. Main St. )16I
WAFFLES, Sandwiches, Dinners. An-
gelo's Restaurant, 1100 E. Catherine.
Open Tuesday thru Sunday 7 a.m. to
8 p.m. Ph. NO 8-9538. )18I
TYPEWRITERS! Portable and Standard
for rent, sales and service.
MORRILLS
314 State St., Phone NO 8-7177
T E A T R

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Ending Tonight
RANDOLPH SCOTT
in
"The Stranger Wore A Gun"

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BUY AS
YOU RENT!
ANN ARBOR
OFFICE MACHINES

I

STARTS WEDNESDAY
THE PICTURE
EVERYONE IS TALKING ABOUTI
if the one about the
'girds and the bees bores you....
if irate fathers
don't scare you-
bta vine-covered
cottage does..
may we suggest:
WI[[IAM HOLIN DAVIDNIVEN ,MAGI[ McNAiMARA

,

211 East Liberty
Phone 8727

I_

BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY 9Y
ANN ARBOR COCA COLA BOTTLING CO.

-Coke- isa sregistered trode-mortc.

1953, THE COCA-COLA COMPANY

Daily Classifieds Bring Quick Results

o a
ti PAUL McDONOUGH 0
U HIS PIANO AND ORCHESTRA AT THE
CANBE RY B
TTHIS SATURDAY NIGHT
9 to 1 .,. UNION ONLY $1.50 per couple.
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"HARMONY HARVEST"
Saturday, November 21
Ann Arbor High School Auditorium
featuring The ONCHORDS - International
Semi Finalists - and 9 other quartets.

If you like Barbershop Harmony, don't miss

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INFANTRY CHORUS

8:30 P.M.

Tickets at the Union

$1 eperson

U

NOW
SHOWING!

l Ehi

Mats. 50c
Eves. 70c

ON THE GIANT MIRACLE MIRROR SCREEN
M-G-M's GIGANTIC ADVENTURE!
THRILLS IN TECHNICOLOR!
ROBRTE R
ST WARRTA
GRANGER- t
NEXT - DORIS DAY in "CALAMITY JANE"

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Student irect ries
ON SALE-

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BLENDED
B AIR STYLING
SIX EXPERTS
715 N. University

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DELICIOUS FOOD

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