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November 15, 1953 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-11-15

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1153

mm

'54 Outlook COLLEGE ROUND-UP: MARCHING BAND ---146 STRONG:
Ho Siberians Produce TV;

0

"W

J1-F LI%3umuu

Business leaders and economics
department faculty members met
yesterday in the second session of
a two-day conference which dis-
cussed "Analyzing the Econonic
Outlook."
Beginning yesterday morning's
session was an address on "The
Agricultural Outlook" by Francis
C. Jones of a Minnesota food-
packing firm. Jones said "the great
bulk of farm production costs are
fixed, while cyclical fluctuations in
our economy are generated in the
non-agricultural sector."
' AGRICULTURE suffers more
froms the down-swing than does
the industrial sector, he said.
Speaking on the short-term
outlook for farmers, Jones said
"there is considerable sentiment
in some quarters for a return. to
the original concept that direct
programs should be used only to
prevent disasters from striking
the farm community."
Jones noted that recently there
has been an 18 per cent decline in
farm prices and a sharp decline
in exportation of agricultural pro-
ducts.
Also on the morning's agenda
was Prof. Lawrence R. Klein of the
economics department. Prof. Klein
spoke on "Statistical Models of
General Economic Activity, as Ap-
plied to 1954."
"With a population growing in
sizeand productivity, we need
a growing national product to
maintain full employmeflt," he
said. Prof. Klein forecasted an
increase in unemployment un-
less the length of the working
week is cut.
Conference sessions continued
(all day yesterday. At a ,luncheon
meeting Prof. William Haber of
the economics department spoke
on "The Labor Outlook for 1954."
Students Visit
Drama Clinic
Maxwell Anderson and the
speech department collaborated
yesterday in the department's an-
nual high school drama clinic.
Twenty-nine Michigan h i g h
schools sent representatives to the
all-day clinic which included a
performance of the current speech
department production "Elizabeth
the Queen."
The 350 students and teachers
also participated in a discussion
concerning problems encounter-
ed in producing the play.
Speeches were given by Prof.
William Halstead, acting direc-
tor of play production, Phyllis
Pletcher, in charge of costuming
Joel Sebastian and Frances
Reitz, the leading actors in "Eliza-
beth," also discussed their roles
and answered questions on their
performance.
The drama clinic is designed
to give high school students a
knowledge of what goes on be-
hind the scenes, and how an un-
professional group solves its
problems.
Haberler To Talk
On Business Cycle
Prof. Gottfried Haberler of Har-
vard University' will speak on
"Some Reflections on the Current
State of the Business Cycle The-
ory" at 8 p.m. tomorrow in Rack-
ham Amphitheater.
Prof. Haberler's address is spon-
sored by the Economics Club.

'Diamondback' Banned
By JANET FORD er the set-up that took 50 students
At colleges throughout t h e 18 months to build.
world: .
Students at Tomsk Polytechni- SEVERAL thousand copies of
cal Institute in Siberia are now the "Diamondback," student news-
producing their own television pro- paper at the University of Mary-
grams on a student-built trans- land, were confiscated by the
mitter. a r school's dear of men, Geary Ep-
News, documentary and variety pley, who objected to a photograph
shows are broadcast regularly ov- of crowded dormitory conditions
which appeared in the paper.

B~and~smen Display

Perfection
Marching

In

Musical

Ability,

Lawson To Give
Cooley Lechures
Prof. Frederick H. Lawson of
Oxford University will begin a
series of lectures on "A Common
Law Lawyer Looks at Civil Law"I
at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow in Rm. 120

When a reporter from the
"Baltimore Sun" came to the
Maryland campus to cover the
university's censorship activities,
he was arrested by campus police
and temporarily prohibited from
phoning the story to his paper.
'D * Eo
DEAN HUGH Taylor of Prince-

Twenty-five thousand miles, or a distance greater than the cir-
cumference of the globe, is traversed each season by the University
of Michigan Marching Band without leaving its practice field in Ann
.Arbor.
The Band steps this distance in preparation for approximately
45 minutes on the field at halftime. But all this work shows up in
flawless performances that have earned the group a reputation as the
finest college marching band in the country.
* * * *

Hutchins Hall. ton University's graduate school
Opening the Thomas M. Cooley of liberal arts has ruled that all
lecture series with an address on his students must wear their aca-
"The Historical Background," demic gowns to dinner.
Prof. Lawson will give one address Students voted to have the or-
each day from Monday through der abolished, but Dean Taylor
Friday on other phases of com- said, "there are certain things
mon and civil law. that votes do not decide."
0 -e
Fabulous Faille
Takes to print
JONATHAN LOGAN
adds glamour to the life
of every junior with
exciting paisley
patterned faille in
cover-up dress with low
neckline, so perfect for
day or evening wear.
The fitted waist area is
held in place with
shaped self belt above
whirling skirt.
Sizes 7 to 15 $14.95
R "*.
9 Nickels Arcade 217 South Main

I

PRECISION FORMATIONS range from the traditional Block "M"
to dance stunts that are so complex they have never been attempted
by any other band.
Under the direction of Prof. William D. Revelli, the band
practices from 4:20 to 5:40 p.m. four days a week. Instruction
sheets bearing a maze of circles and crosses that wduld astonish
the uninitiated are given to each bandsman and out of the seem-
ing chaos the perfect show is developed.
Prof. Revelli also demands superior musicianship from his band,
believing that marching is being over-emphasized when a band march-
es better than it plays.
THE MARCHING BAND dates back to 1895 when the official
band was organized by order of the Regents to play at football games,
socials and other events. It has been growing ever since and today
146 take the field at halftime led by drum major Floyd Zarbock, '54
A&D.
It is the Band's unusual balance between music quality and
marching which gains the attention of boththe layman and the
professional. An instrumentation is employed with a balance be-
tween w6odwinds and brasses that is generaly absent from col-
ege bands. Instruments are spread throughout the band instead
of in separate sections so that the quality sounds equally good
from all sides. It is really four bands in one, Prof. Revelli ex-
plained.
All music is tailor-made for the Band. Prof. Revelli and George
Cavender, assistant conductor, spend about 35 hours each on a show.
A firm believer in fundamentals, Prof. Revelli feels that.if one stress-
es the fundamentals instead of the performance itself the show is
boundto be good. In addition, Revelli often hears each member of the
band individually so that he can be sure the tone is just right.
Entering the field at a snappy 210 steps per minute, the band
maintains a cadence ranging from a slow 100 steps per minute to 176
during formations, depending on the music. However, Prof. Revelli
rhaintains that the cadence which dazzles spectators takes second
place to unity, precision and coordination which is what really'makes
a band stand out.

THE LONE RANGER RIDES DOWN THE FIELD

{1 H4 .4
4 . . . f( F 4
} 1 " M r., e Trfa !a
A ASERPANISALAS ECSSR

PROF. REVELLI
... Band Conductor

PERCY, THE BAND'S 147TH MEMBER

DAILY
PICTURE
PAGE
Story by
FREDDI LOEWENBERG
Pictures by
CHUCK KELSEY

A

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a u) Wt~w

With a whole winter season ahead-
ZIPSTERS, STORMCOATS, CASUALS
at 39.95

CASUAL COATS of Kamakurl,
Glamalure, Zibeline, Fleece,
and Tweeds. . . Orig. were to
98.95. Sale priced from 39.95
to 79.95.
FUR TRIMMED COATS now
from 59.95 to 85.00. Orig to
115.00.
ot right: Tweed casual, milium lined
now 49.95.
at for right: The fabric-exciting Glam-
alure. The fur-beaver, a warm won-
derful coat, milium lined, in natural,
now 69.95.
The velvet oill box hat at 5.95.

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THEIR PERFORMANCE OVER, 13ANDSMEN RELAX AND WATCH THE GAME

RON BORNSTEIN
. . Announcer

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