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November 15, 1953 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-11-15

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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

MAGAZINE PAGE--PAGrE ' TIMEE

SUNAYNOVMBE 15 193 'AGAiNEPAG-PAE TRT

Leslie Bassett Compositions
Will Be Performed Today

A program of compositions by
Leslie Bassett, Music School in-
structor in theory and composi-
tion, ranging from a sonata for
horn and piano to a trio for viola,
clarinet and piano will be perform-
ed by faculty members at 4:15 p.m.
today in Auditorium A. Angell
Hall.
Bassett, who hails from Fresno,
California, "and area" studied
composition with Arthur Honegger
and Nadia Boulanger at the Ecole
Normale de Musique in Paris when
there on a Fullbright scholarship,
1950-51.
OPENING the composition pro-
gram will be a Sonata for Horn
and Piano. The horn part will be
played by Ted Evans and Prof.
Helen Titus will perform at the
piano. Both are members of the
music school faculty.
Six Piano Pieces. will appear
on the program with Prof. Ben-
ning Dexter as the piano solo-
ist. This set of compositions won
a performance award sponsored
by the California Federation of
Music Clubs when it ,was per-
formed in Los Angeles.
A set of Five Songs, to be sung
by Miss Norma Heyde, instructor
in the music school, will be 'given
their first public hearing at the
concert. Poetry by George Herbert,

William Blake and Edwin Arling-
ton Robinson will furnish the lyr-
ics. The composers wife, Mrs. Ani-
ta Bassett will accompany on the
piano.
* * *
AN UNUSUAL Trio for Viola,
Clarinet and Piano will be heard
publicly for the first time in to-
day's program, and will be per-
formed by David Ireland, viola,
Prof. William Stubbins, clarinet
and Mary McCall Stubbins at the
piano.
The most recently completed
composition to be heard is Bas-
sett's Brass Trio, to which the
finishing touches' were added
three weeks ago. It is an unus-
ual work, he asserts in that it
is composed of three fast move-
ments. Donald Haas, trumpet,
Glenn Smith, trombone and Ted
Evans, French horn, will per-
form the trio.
Final number in the concert is
Bassett's Second String Quartet
which will be performed by the
Stanley Quartet. More of a pro-
duction number than the other
works on the program, the quar-
tet won a performance award
when first played in Los Angeles.
The concert is open to the public
without charge.

22(e VAN BUREN Shop

Engel's New
O'Neill Study
Interpreted
By ANNE STEVENSON
The Haunted Heroes of Eugene
O'Neill by Edwin A. Engel, Har-
vard University Press.
For anyone interested but not
profoundly versed in American
drama this book should be inval-
uable. Without contributing, one
would guess, any astounding post-
humous insights into the mind of
Eugene O'Neill, Professor Engel
has traced the development of his
"Haunted Heroes" .in the light
both of his character and of the
artistic climate in which he wrote.
Perceptive analyses of O'Neill's
dramas interspersed with relative
comments on their themes, their
motivating impulses, their wide di-
versity of value, and the reasons
for their success or failure are fur-
ther eludicated by an attention to
the prevailing intellectual winds
of his time. These, as you will re-
member, were not balmy April
breezes.
Now, although O'Neill,' as Mr.
Engel points out, was in many
cases not directly influenced by his
stormy contemporaries (he is out-
spokenly opposed to Expression-
ism), he could not, beings tormy
himself, well defend his ideas
against the slings and arrows
which his fortune, h o w e v e r
outrageous, hurled unremittingly
against him. He ducks this way
and that, looking in every corner
of the pigsty in which he houses
humanity, for shelter and salva-
tion. As he does so, his "heroes,"
in most cases reincarnations or
partial reincarnations of himself,
undergo parallel agonies. They are
victims of universal forces, of in-
eluctable passions, supernatural
manias; as O'Neill passes through
successive stages of his life, he
generously endows his protagonists
with all those qualities which ren-
der it insufferable. Concerned ear-
ly in his career with "monomani-
acal monsters" and "darwiniam
brutes" (the adjectives are Mr.
Engel's) of the Glencairn plays,
O'Neill moves through portrayals
of "the man of feeling" among the
unfeeling, to an enduring and ob-
sessive preoccupation with man
searching for something to feel
about. This is man primitivistic,
paganistic, puritanistie, pantheis-
tic, symbolistic, and heaven knows,
pessimistic, seeking for answers
to the unanswerable under the
guise of every conceivable "com-
plex" modern psychology can ac-
count for.
The plays are individually treat-
ed in detail-too much detail. For
a reader unaquainted with O'Neill,
the plot synopses are useful,. but
for the man who knows the plays
already, they are superfluous. Be-
yond this, however, everything Mr.
Engel has to say in evaluation of
O'Neill is to the point. Although
couched in all the proper analyt-
ical language, his conclusions are
sound and made, one feels, with-
out prejudice and with perspec-
tive. He neither 'over or under es-
timates his subject, but allows him
his justly earned place among the
greater American writers with the
observation that "while O'Neill ad-
vanced along technical lines, while
he sharpened certain perceptions,
while he probed more deeply into
some conditions, he failed general-
ly to move intellectually and emo-
tionally beyond early manhood."
This seems a fair judgement. It
may be added that Mr. Engel
draws from an apparently deep
fund of knowledge, that his schol-
arship seems impeccable and that
his style is lucid and pleasant to
read.

LAB
Play BillI
Set To Open
Laboratory bills, with students
taking over complete production
responsibility are the cause of
much excitement around the
speech department.
Students who have directed or
theorized in class now have an op-
portunity to put their ideas in
practice. Directing, costuming and
set designing talents are put to
the test of audience approval.
* * *
LABORATORY bills, open free
of charge to the public, are of a
more experimental nature than
other speech department produc-
tions. The bills are composed of
short selections and are flexible
enough to allow student ingenu-
ity.
The semester's first laboratory
bill will be presented Friday and
Saturday in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater. This will be a comedy
bill, with three short selections
of a humorous tone.
Christopher Fry's subtle wit will
be exhibited in "A Phoenix Too
Frequent."
An Irish comedy, "The Shadow
of the Glen" by J. M. Synge, will
take audiences from poetry to di-
alect, with a liberal share of the
Irish humor.
"The Neighbors," by Zona Gale,
and Act II of Smetna's opera "The
Bartered Bride" complete the pro-
gram.

'Mandragola'1
A non-evistent drug and the oft-
woven eternal triangle will high-
light the second Arts Theater pro-
duction of the season, "Mandra-
gola."
Beginning its run Friday, the
story concerns the conflict between
a husband and wife over her lov-
er's affections. The theme centers
about the lover's use of the hus-
band to help him win the wife.
A * *
STARRING in the Machiavelli
comedy are Bernard Tome as the
husband, John Bennes as the lov-
er, Nancy Born as the wife, Kay
Keppler as her mother, Gerald
Richards as the procurer, Teresa
Hughes, Strowan Robertson and
newcomer Robert King.
The play is being directed by
Robert Hughes with sets by Roy

oOpen Friday
Stafford, original music by Karl
Magnuson and costumes by
Joyce McPherson.
The first production in this
country of a short farce by Cer-
vantes will also be presented.
"Show of Wonders" is a 15-minute
burlesque of military life and
pokes fun at town officials.
"Mandragola" will be presented
for four weeks at Arts Theater
Club, 2091/2 E. Washington.
Math Club To Meet
The Undergraduate Mathema-
tics Club will meet at 8 p.m. to-
morrow in Rm. 3-R of the Union.:
Officers will be elected and
Prof. William J. LeVeque of the
mathematics department w ill
speak.

CLOSING PERFORMANCE SUNDAY NIGHT
"DESIRE UNDER THE- ELMS"
By Eugene O'Neill
ARTS THEATER CLUB
2091/ East Washington Phone 7301
YEAR OR SEASON MEMBERSHIP- ON SALE
Bob Marshall's Book.Store Wahr's Book Store
Music Center Arts Theater
WOMEN STUDENTS PLEASE NOTE:
Late permission is granted for Arts Theatre perform-
onces only if the customary .permission is obtained
from the individual house director. It is not auto-
matic.

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