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November 13, 1953 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-11-13

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OVLllGER 13, 1351,

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 195~
I U

MANY CAUSES:
Stomach Aches May Bec
"A child's stom'ach-ache is a intestine, liver, gall bladder, bileI
very real problem," according to ducts, spleen, pancreas and ap-I
Dr. William Rottschaefer of Uni- pendix, Dr. Rottschaefer said.
versity Hospital.p

Stomach-aches cover a broad
area of abdominal organs, such as
the stomach, small intestine, large
Liller To Present
Space Timetable
A space traveler's timetable will
be presented at 7:30 p.m. today in
Auditorium A, Angell Hall, during
the astronomy department's
fourth visitors' night this year.
Following the talk by William
Liller the student observatory on
the fifth floor of Angell Hall will
be open for views of the moon and
Jupiter.

IF THAT weren't enough, there
are the so-called "referred pains,"
those connected with pneumonia,
pleurisy and inflammations of the
pericardial sac, the line of the
cavity where the heart is located,
he added.
Dr. Rottschaefer lists several
possible causes of abdominal
pain-contamination by bacter-
ia, appendicitis, blood disturb-
ances, injuries, inflammation,
poison and aches caused by the
nervous system.
Even a misplaced gesture or a
scolding may enter the stomach
via a child's emotions, causing a

Order Your
Christmas
Cards
t C
Choose from our New Selections!
Let us show you our samples! Beautiful new
styles and designs to choose from! Prices
include imprinting of name and envelopes.
Don t delay! It's time to order now!
OPEN MONDAY EVENINGS
Ramsay Printers, Inc.
119 E. Liberty Ann Arbor Phone 7900
r MMMMMMMMMM

)me Problem
tummy-ache. All in all, the doctor
said, "the child's stomach-ache
may truly be a hard puzzle toj
solve."
Don't belittle the stomach-
ache, the surgeon said. If junior
complains of one at the supper
table, and doesn't want to eat,
don't insist on his finishing the
meal, he added.
Any severe abdominal pain thata
lasts longer than six hours usual-
ly indicates a serious condition in
the abdoman. Miracle drugs not-
withstanding, if not treated quick-
ly, stomach trouble can lead to
long drawn out illness and pos-
sibly major surgery.
"Above all, lay off the castor
oil," Dr. Rottschaefer said. It3
merely adds an irritant to an al-,
ready irritated stomach.
Civil Service~
Jobs Offered
Temporary part-time and full-
time clerks are needed by the In-
ternal. Revenue Service for offices
in Chicago and Springfield, Ill.,
Detroit and Milwaukee.
Male accountants are wanted by'
the General Accounting Office to
staff regional audit offices in large
cities throughout the country. Ap-
licants for this and the internal
revenue jobs can inquire at the
Ann Arbor post office.
Qualified engineers are being
sought by the Puget Sound Naval
Shipyard in Bremerton, Wash., to
complete modernization of the air-
craft carrier USS Franklin D.
Roosevelt.
N. B. Wright will interview in-
terested engineers today in thea
Michigan EmploymentySecurity
Commission Office at 111 Felch
St.

Union Student Offices

The electromyograph, long used
for diagnostic purposes in Uni-
versity Hospital polio cases, may
now prove to have therapeutic
value.
According to Dr. Oeorge H. Ko-
epke of the Department of Phy-
sical Medicine and Rehabilitation
in the Medical ,School, the ma-
chine notifies both the eye and
the ear of muscle action in much
the same way as an electrocardi-
ograph measures heart impulses.
* * *
MUSCLE SPASMS picked up by
the machine, now in the experi-
mental stage, can be heard as
they come through a loudspeaker#
and are simultaneously seen as
waves projected on a screen.
A patient seeing the reactions
of his own muscles "is often en-
couraged to use those muscles
which appeared to him to be.
hopelessly impaired," Dr. Koep-
ke explained.
By providing the doctor and
his patient with a visible and au-
dible picture of muscular spasms,
the electromyograph can be used
as a guide in developing a better
pattern of breathing.
The restoration of polio patients
suffering from a weakness of res-
piratory muscles has proved dif-
ficult, Dr. Koepke said.
"Whenever we finda device or
technique which promises to be a
useful method of treatment, we
are a step closer to recovery, he
added.

ciecemver

OLD MACHINE:
Device Proves
To Be Useful Attentionr Ann:l ue...
As Polio-Cure

V :.Y
y ' "
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S4S. P1 dPSA

m m - -

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PLASTERER AT WORK--The new student and business offices
will probably be finished within a month, according to Union
officials. Plastering is now being done in the offices, and fluores-
cent lighting should be installed soon.

0f

Ic! INl

;

School .Board
Announces Bid
Opening Date
Bids on the new ,Ann Arbor High
School building will be taken be-I
ginning Jan. 13, the Board of Edu-
cation announced yesterday.
Cost of the new high school has
been set at an estimated $5,500,-
000, which will include a swim-
ming pool and other modern inno-
vations.
The University has an option on
the present school building facingI
South State which is expected to!
be vacated by 1955.
Although purchase price of the.
building has not yet been set, the
University capital outlay request
calls for a planning fund of $50,-
000 from the State Legislature to
establish extent and estimated
cost of modernization.
Present plans indicate the build-
ing will beused by the University
to house social science and lan-
guage courses.
Jurai To Speak

Proofs
Proofs for senior pictures for
the '54 'Ensian may be return-
ed to the Student Publications
Bldg. between 10 a.m. and noon
and 1 and 6 p.m. Monday
through Friday next week.

READ DAILY

CLASSIFIEDS

ACADEMIC FREEDOM
FACULTY, STUDENTS, STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
About $300 is urgently needed to print the booklet on
ocademic freedom to be distributed on campus next
week.
Please mail your contributions to PAULA LEVIN,.
Student Legislature Building, as soon as possible.

_
r
i
I

114 E. William St.
Between Main and
Fourth Ave.
PHONE 7191
OPEN .
Daily 10 A.M. to 10 P.M.
Sundays Noon to 7 P.M.

Save Time!
NO PARKING PROBLEM
NO WAITING -
JUST DRIVE THROUGH
ICE CUBES
KEG BEER

Prof. J. M. Juran of the mathe-
matics department of New York
University will speak on "Success
and Failure in Quality Control
Programs" at 8 p.m. today in
Rackham Amphitheater.

We have ICE CUBES

" BEER * WINE

0 SOFT DRINKS

U .. _ _ . _ . . _ _

Graduating
Engineers,
Are you looking for a
career in the field
of aviation?
Northrop
Engineering Representative,
Charles Griffith,
will conduct
Campus In terviews
Friday
November 13
Please call Engineering-
Placement Service for
appointment.
Northrop Aircraft, Inc.

A famous playwright revisits the scenes
of his college days and brings back an*
affectionate,.soul-searching and controversial
essay on the life and times of a great university.
by ARTHUR MILLER
author of "DEATH OF A SALESMAN"
How has Michigan changed since the thoughtful,
thunderous thirties? How has the University's person-
ality been affected by its rivalry with Michigan State?
What makes today's student so different from yester-
day's?
See if you agree with the answers to these and many
other questions offered by playwright and Michigan
alumnus Arthur Miller. It's one of the most penetrating
articles on the University of Michigan ever written .. .
and it's ready for your reading in the beautiful December
Holiday magazine!
Here is the new and the old University seen through
the eyes of one of its most sensitive graduates. Here are
many of the prominent professors-their feelings toward
the present-day practicality. Here are young gals and
guys who represent a new attitude toward college
education. It's your Michigan ... all of it!
If you're interested in the past, present or future of
this great University, be sure to read this contro-
versial Holiday article. Get your copy of the December
Holiday today!
Millions of Americans will read about ... Ann Arbor
. Hill Auditorium . . . depression years . .. Prof. Kenneth
Rowe . .. Avery Hopwood .. . the Arboretum .. . Willow Run
Airport ... TV station . . . fraternities . . . Michigan Daily ...
the Phoenix Project ..., student theater . . . Generation,.
modern architecture . . . Psychology Department . . . steel
furniture *. . Haven and Mason Halls . . . engineers .. .
Michigan football ... The Values ... feeble backtalk ... girl
students . . . panty raids . . . course changes . . . absence of
student expression ... fear of name calling ... gumshoeing
... academic rating ... politics ... and aoy other subjects
of interest to everyone.
NOW AT YOUR NEWSSTAND!

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