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November 01, 1953 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1951

Ivan Parker
Discusses'U'
Scholarships
Ability, character and-need are
the qualifications taken into con-
sideration when allocating schol-
arship funds, according to Assist-
ant to the Dean of Students Ivan
W. Parker, who is secretary of the
Committee on University Schbl-
arships.
The grade average a student
must hold in order to qualify.for
an award depends on the range of
averages of all applicants. Because
of this competitive comparison
process a student may win a schol-
arship one year yet be unable to
qualify the next, Parker explain-
ed.
* * *
APPLICANTS are usually advis-
ed by the scholarship committee
to work part time to help pay their
own way.
Parker said that no monetary
awards are given solely on the
basis of ability. However, there
are a few honor awards that are
given for superior achievement
which are not accompanied by

Candidates Race

for SL

* '- *

-Daily-Chuck Kelsey
SPACE AND LIGHT ABOUND IN THE CLASSROOM OF TOMORROW
e * * * * * * * *
Boyd Designs 'Cassroom of Tomorrow'

CANDIDATE BEGINS BY FILLING OUT PETITION,
WRITING PLATFORM

<t7

By JOAN SARFIN
What is now a laboratory ex-
periment in classroom architec-
ture may soon become a reality
through efforts of research physi-
cist Robert A. Boyd, and his as-
sociates.
"The Classroom of Tomorrow,"
designed for fifth grade students,
is a product of many months of
research directed by Boyd, who
heads the University's daylighting
laboratory.
LOOKING like a modern play-
rbom, the classroom is equipped,
with a television set, blackboards
which reverse to becQme drawing
easels, a movie projector for visual
education and white glass panels
for painting.
The designers' purpose was to
create an atmosphere of comfort

and relaxation with the belief
that such an environment con-
tributes to a child's ability and
willingness to learn.
Furniture in the room is light-
weight and portable so the teach-
er may rearrange tables and chairs
to suit any activity and conduct
the class from any angle in the'
room.
Colorful green curtains of fi-
berglass can be adjusted so part!
of the class may watch a movie
in darkness while the rest of the
children go on with their usual
work.
* * *
ACCORDING to Boyd, lighting
is the most important factor in
the experimental classroom. "I'd
estimate about 75 per cent of the
nation's schools don't -meet mini-
mum light recommendations of

the Illumination Engineering So- financial aid. Among these
ciety," he said. awards is the James B. Angell
Boyd's daylighting system of- Award.
fers almost twice as much The committee on University
light as conventional systems. Scholarships is made up of the
Through the use of special glass Dean of Women and the Deanof
block on windows, incoming Students as ex-officio members,
light is directed toward the cei- and Parker as executive secretary.
ling. In most classrooms light is At present, representatives from
directed toward the floor, the literary, engineering and ar-
The lighting system is construct- chitecture and design faculties are
ed so a high percentage of sunlight serving on the committee. The
will be transmitted in winter and committee duty is to compare the
a lower percentage in summer. eligibility of applicants and select
On dark days, additional floures- recipients.
cent lights go on automatically. Largest contributor to the schol-
Completed in September,' the arship sums available is the Re-
"Classroom of Tomorrow" is only gents Alumni Fund. Last year 488
an experiment, but Boyd hopes entering freshmen from Michigan
many features of the experimental received these tuition awards. A
room will be used by architects in total of 1,267 students now hold this
designing future classrooms. Regents scholarship.
YOU CAN'T BUY HEALTH
but you con go a long way in y
taking the proper care of your
Sbody.To obtain healthful relaxa- "
tion ... and build up resistance,
-<we offer services in hand mas-
sage, body contour and spot re-
ducing treatments. Make your
appointment without delay.
K. Jewell R. Jewell
K and 11-J Health Studio
Ground Floor 324 E. Liberty, Phone 2-6428. OPEN EVENINGS
Located next to Colonial Yarn Shop
SE PARATE S

Thirty-f ive Run
For 23 Po0sitions
Would-be Legislators Face Crowds
Of Faces, Pirolonged Questioning
As November election time draws near, each of the 35 candidates
for Student Legislature is heightening his efforts to gain one of the
23 longed-for positions.
Since time this year between turning in petitions, filled with 150
signatures, and Election Day was shortened to two and a half weeks,
candidates have had to intensify last-minute efforts to get their pos-
ters printed, draw up platforms on which to run and speak to multi-
tudes of faces at lunches, dinners and open-houses all over campus.
* * * *
BECAUSE only four of the candidates have been elected before
to the Legislature, for the remaining 31 students vying for posts, the
contest is a new experience, filled
with unique problems and new
confusions - all coming in the
midst of mid-term examinations.
To aid contenders, who in the
coming weeks will be the focus
of many controversies and point-
ed questions, the Legislature
. has set up a Candidates' Train-
ing Program, to acquaint would-
be parliamentarians with SL's
organization, major election is-
sues and perennial problems
faced by the campus body.
In these training programs, of-
ficers of the Legislature explain
SL's purpose, information is cir-
culated on SL's complex committee
and Executive Wing structure and
candidates learn the rules of elec.
tioneering-where and how they
housing units they may campaign
r .~door-to-door fashion and when
open housed will be held in var-
ious residence halls and fraternity
} and sorority houses.
Among the less esoteric prob-
lems candidates must learn to con-
quer are hoarse voices after an
average of three speeches a day in
the last week before election,
where to get the money to pay
their poster-printers and how to
cram in a few hours of studying
NG 150 REQUIRED SIGNATURES between speaking engagements.

1

r

i

I
e'

Pakistan Educator Commends
Exchange Student Programs

"The exchange student program
is of very great value because it en-
ables students, especially those
from underdeveloped areas, to gain
a, broader outlook," according to
I. H. Qureshi, Minister of Educa-
tion in Pakistan.
Qureshi, who came to America
to attend a colloquium on Islamic
culture, has taken advantage of
his visit by touring several col-
leges. "I thought I should avail
myself of the opportunity to un-
derstand educational facilities in
this country as it would be of great
value to me in helping my stu-
dents," the noted educator said.
s s a
QURESHI commented that
young people from all parts of the
world are basically similar, but
they differ in the training they
have received. The Pakistan edu-
cational system differs from the
American in that it follows the
British method, he said.
Qureshi declined to eomment
on the problem of academic
freedom but defined academic
freedom as the "right to solve
problems but not to meddle in
politics."
Since Pakistan attained inde-
pendence her educational facili-
ties have improved, the minister
said. As an example he cited the
fact that where six elementary]
schools had existed before there!
are now 176. Also the universities4
have increased from two to six, he
added.l
* * *
COMMENTING on the Kashmiro
situation, Qureshi said, "The prob-1

THE LEAGUE PROVIDES EXCELLENT FACILITIES FOR GETTII

{..

4

I. H. QURESHI
* * *
lem is still no nearer solution."
But he remarked that a plebiscite
should be held to decide whether
Kashmir would be merged with
India or Pakistan.
For many years Pakistan has
been governed without a con-
stitution, but Qureshi said "we
have now achieved unanimity on
the structure of our government,
and that is a great step."
Qureshi expressed the hope that
Pakistani students in America are
gaining a knowledge of American
culture and are acting as unofficial
ambassadors to this country. "I
hope they will succeed in strength-
ening the ties of friendship that
exist between our two countries,"
he concluded.

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CANDIDATES LEARN AIOUT LEGISLATURE IN A TRAINING PROGRAM...

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1954
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A DAILY
PHOTO
FEATURE
Story by
Dorothy Myers
Pictures by
Malcolm Shatz

. GET ACQUAINTED
WITH SL BLDG.

POSTERS SOON CROWD EVERY AVAILABLE SPACE*...

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