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September 16, 1953 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-09-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE six

ff HE MICHIG.A.N DAILY

PAGJ~ SIX TilE MICHIGAIN DAILY

I

iP'Baseball Team

Won National Championship

;,

** *

Trackmen Try for Title

Excellent Pitching Was Key
Factor in Michigan Victory'

Wolverine Basketball Team
To Be Stronger This Year

(Continued from Page 5)
IlliniL haided the Michigan squad
a 79%-523 setback, in a meet fea-
tured by the setting of six, new,
records.
Milt Mead, Wolverine cage
star who didn't don a track out-
fit -until after the hoop sport
was finished for the year, es-.
tablished new meet, Ferry Field
and Varsity records as he high-
jumped 6 feet, 8. 9inches to
thrill the several thousand spec-
tators on hand for the meet.
Nilsson set a meet record in the
discus when he hurled the saucer
158 feet 51 /ainches. He hurled the

shot 54 feet 10 inches to establish
a new meet record in that depart-
ment also.
The same situation that exist-
ect in the Indoor 'championshis
was present again a few weeks
later as Champaign was the
scene of the Outdoor Track and
Field Championships.
Illinois was first, Michigan was
second and rest of the Big Ten
was far behind. Illinois had an-
nexed its sixth straight crown and
the Wolverines, though possessing
a great team, returned to Ann Ar-
bor with the accustomed feeling of
being only second best..

t-

'THE T aYl o-M'ade S:HOE.

E

I'

I

National Champions - that isr
the record of the 1953 Michigan
baseball team. ,
The first Wolverine team everf
to enter the post-season playoffs.r
at Omaha, Nebraska walked off
with top honors by stopping a
favored University of Texas outfit
in the final game of the tourna-
ment, 7-5.
* * *
RAY FISHER, who has guided
the diamond destinies of the
Maize and Blue for the past 32
years, tookl his team through the
rugged Western Conference sched-
ule in good style, experiencing
serious difficulty only with thek
Iowa Hawkeyes and Michigan
State.
The Iowa nine caught thet
Wolverines on their bad day
and whipped them twice. Mich-{
igan State beat the Maize andt
Blue by a score of 6-5 in extra
innings when Spartan catcher
Ton Yewcic hit a home run. Ink
the return game however, Mich-r
igan took revenge with a 20-21
drubbing of the East Lansing
team.
Michigan beat Illinois twice at'
Champaign, but the Illini re-
bounded from the losses and came
on with a rush to tie the Wolver-
ines for the conference title.
IT IS USUALLY standard pro-
cedure when two teams tie for a
championship and a representa-t
tive to some tournament must be
named to pick the team which
had the better record against itsk
co-champion. In this case, the:
two games Michigan took from
the Illini were the veason's for
Fisher's team getting the chance
to play against Ohio University
for the right to represent the Mid-f
west at the N.C.A.A. tourney. The
Wolverines made short work of
Ohio, winning both games with
comparative ease.f
Throughout the season and at
the N.C.A.A. tournament, Mich-
igan's great strength was its
pitching staff. Fisher, an expert
when it comes to developing
good hurlers, had a top-notch
mound corps which included
Jack Corbett, Marv Wisniewski,
Dick Yirkosky and Jack Ritter.
Ritter was the hero of the
N.C.A.A. final against the Texas
Longhorns. He came into the1
game as a relief pitcher in thel
last half of the ninth inning with
the score 7-5 in favor of Michigan,
but with the bases jammed with
Texans and Paul Mohr, a .388
hitter in the batter's box. Ritter
threw three fast strikes past Mohr,
and got the next man on a ground-
er to Captain Bill Mogk at first
and Michigan had a national base-
ball crown.
IN ADDITION to the stalwart

mound corps, the rest of the team
supplied sufficient batting punch
to carry the team along on the!
few days when the pitchers were
not clicking.
Particularly impressive was
Michigan's great little shortstop
Bruce Haynam. He was named
to the All-America Baseball
squad and following the Omaha.
tournament he was acknoivledg-
ed to have been its outstanding
individual performer.
Playing next to Haynam in the
Michigan infield was one of the
finest all-round athletes in the
school, Don Eaddy. Eaddy com-
bined some powerful hitting with
steady defensive work at third
base. He will be on the baseball
squad for two more seasons, and
Coach Fisher can accordingly
cross third base off his list of
trouble spots for next season.
* * a *
GRADUATION will take second
baseman Gil Sabuco, first base-
man Bill Mogk, and outfielders
Frank Howell, Bill Billings .and.
Gerry Harrington.
As severe as are these losses,
there will still be a strong team
representing Michigan on the
diamond next spring.
A talented freshman team is ex-
pected to yield several infielders
and outfielders to help fill vacan-
cies, and most important of 'all,
the pitching staff which carried
the Wolverines to the top of* the
nation's college baseball teams will:
return intact and will be bolstered
by two outstanding freshman
hurlers, Al Ferrelli and Dick Peter-
John.
So it is with anticipation that
Ray Fisher, college baseball'sI
"Coach of the Year" in 1953 looksI
forward to another season. He has'
coached ten conference champs,
in the past dozen years and pros-
pects are bright to make that
figure 11 in 13 years.
DID YOU KNOW: that Michi-
gan has won 18 Western Confer-!
ence Baseball titles? The 1953
varsity climaxed its brilliant sea-
son by winning the national
championship at Omaha. Ray
Fisher has coached the Maize and
Blue for the last 32 years, and
during the past 12 seasons, his
teams have won 10 Big Ten cham-
pionships.

THIS RUN DIDN'T SCORE-Michigan's Bill Mogk is out at the
plate attempting to score from second on a single. Though the
Wolverines failed to get this run, they got more than their share
during the season and wound up on top of the college baseball
world as National Champions.
Michigan. Boasts America's
Finest Facilites for Athletics

"Race-horse basketball" moved
into Yost Fieldhouse along with
new cage coach Bill Perigo last
season, and although first year,
results were no better than the
ninth place finish of the previous
campaign, the new style of play
is definitely here to stay.
The varsity won six games and,
lost 16 over the course of the
season, but in Big Ten play the
Wolverines could manage only
three victories against 15 losses.
* * * -
COACH PERIGO, coming to
Michigan from Western Michigan
College, where he gave that school
the championship of the Mid-
America Basketball Conference,
saw his team play its best game
of the season against the na-
tional champion Indiana Hoosiers.
The Michigan squad fought val-
iantly before yielding by a 91-88
score. It was one of Indiana's
toughest games all season.
Perigo brought Matt Patanel-
li from Western Michigan to
assist him with the basketball
team. Patanelli, a former foot-
ball and basketball star at Mich-
igan in his undergraduate days
in the mid-thirties, is also slated
to coach the football ends on de-
fensive maneuvers this fall.
Perigo's high-scoring team was
paced by sophomore center Paul
Groffsky of Maplewood, New Jer-
sey. Groffsky became the first
Michigan basketball player to
score over 300 points since Leo!
Vanderkuy turned the trick with
329 in 1950-51.
* * *
GROFFSKY SCORED 106 field
goals in 308 attempts and 89 free
throws for a 301 point total. His
shooting percentage of .344 was!
.also high for the team.
The Michigan team managed
to score 1,551 points during the
season for a 70.4 average per
game. Both figures are records
for basketball at the University.
Sophomore guard Don Eaddy
ranked a close 'second to Groffsky,
pumping in 292 counters to add to
his freshman output of 181. The
resulting two-year aggregate of
473 gives Eaddy a good chance of
coming close to All-American
Mack Suprunowicz's four-year to-
tal on the local hoop scene.
* h
JUMPING John Codwell finish-I

ed a point ahead of 6-7 Milt Mead
in the Wolverine scoring race.
Set-shooting Doug Lawrence
whistled through 168 scores,
most of them on long shots, to
run his career record to 332. The
hustling captain of last season's
cagers delighted fans through-
out the year with his aggressive
style of play.
At the end of the season the
team elected Ray Pavichevich, a
ball-hawking Hoosier from East
Chicago, Indiana, to the captaincy
of the 1953-54 squad. Pavichevich
has scored 233 points in his two
years on the team, and like Law-
rence is a hustling, heads-up play-
er and a natural team leader.
* * *
THE TEAM named Groffsky as
its most valuable player of the
1952-53 season. In addition to his
point-getting ability, Groffsky was
an excellent rebounder and was
highly instrumental in all of
Michigan's victories.
He scored 15 points In the
opening ,win over Marquette, 16
in the victory over Pittsburgh,
and reached his peak with 25
against Purdue as Michigan roll-
edover the Boilermakers.
In Michigan's second Big Ten.
win, a 66-61 conquest of Iowa,
Groffsky was red-hot with 18
points in the first half and a game
total of 19. He was high point
man for both teams that evening.
Groff sky also got 19 points when
Michigan beat Washington of St.
Louis. He was much in evidence
with 15 points the night Michigan
broke *the Yost Fieldhouse scoring
record with a 99-81 victory over
Purdue.
With a talented group of fresh-
men moving up to the varsity, and
with the only serious loss being
that of Lawrence, prospects are
bright for an improved finish this
season.

FINE FOOTWEAR
...for Men.
We feature such famous brands as

Michigan's athletic plant, fin-
anced largely with money made
from football, is considered to beI
the finest anywhere in the nation.
j Ferry Field, a large tract of
land donated at the turn of the
century by Dexter M. Ferry of
Detroit, is the site of several ma-j
jor units. Here are found the Yost
Fieldhouse, first of its kind in
America, and the result of an idea
of the late Fielding H. Yost, who
was Michigan's football coach and

swimming team; and the modern
baseball stadium which is the-
home of Michigan's National
Champions. The stadium seats
over 3,000 people, and is filled
many times during the spring
when Michigan's top opponents
come to town.
Adjoining Ferry Field is South
Ferry Field, scene of the many
Intramural football and baseball
games which dot the sports sched-
ule throughout the academic year.

E. E. TAYLOR
W. L. DOUGLAS
HOLLAND RACINE

WANTED!
1000 HEADS

Director of Athletics for nearly . w._
half-a-century; the huge Intra- I Just off South Ferry Field is the
mural Sports Building, with locker University's 18-hole golf course,
facilities for over 4,000 people, a considered one of the best of its
dozen basketball courts, handball kind in the Middle West, A new
courts, wrestling, boxing and: golf clubhouse was erected two
gymnastics rooms, and a spacious years ago for the convenience of
swimming pool which is the head- participants on the University
quarters of Matt Mann's varsity I course.

he /hey square,.flat or rounded
for thet crew-cud
at

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