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October 25, 1953 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHTT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1953

. _......._........

CHINA WAR CHILDHOOD:
Ko-Lo-Shan Girls Reunited on Campus'

S * * *

By CARL ZIMMERMAN I
Happy childhood memories of a
mountain where breezes made
melodies among the pine needles
while Japanese bombers roared
overhead on their way to attack
Chungking have been revived for
two former playmates who met
again here recently.
They lived in one-story mud
huts, with no electricity or plumb-
ing, but Clare Tseng, '54, and Joan
Hsu, '55, insist that their "best
years" were those spent as refu-
gees from the Japanese on Ko-Lo-
Shan, a mountain some 40 miles
from Chungking.
SINCE China's wartime capital,
Chungking, was bombed heavily by
the Japanese, they explained, many
of the families who had fled the
occupied provinces chose to settle
in safer, though primitive spots
outside the city.
The war was an exciting ad-
venture for the children on the
mountain. The frequent air
raids were just part of the
game, they recalled, because the
planes always flew on to spew
their bombs on the capital.
When peace came in 1945, the
little community on Ko-Lo-Shan
dispersed; But the Chungking days
were not forgotten. A sort of kin-
ship exists among these former
refugees, and one bond is the pro-
vincial dialect which they picked
up there, the two girls explained.
This dialect led to the Ann Ar-
bor reunion. Clare's sister recog-
nized Joan through her use of the
Chungking vernacular. "Why,I
you're Little Tiger!" exclaimed'
Ching Shung Tseng, when she first
met Joan.
So the mountain of youthful
pleasure amid war's terror rose
again, eight years later on the
other side of the world.

'E ns ian
The deadline for 'Ensian.pic-
ture proofs has been set for
November 13.
Proofs may be brought to the
Student Publications Bldg. from
10 a.m. to noon and from 12:30
to 6 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day during this period.
Procurement
Officers Here
Three Naval procurement offi-
cers will be at the Union for four
days beginning tomorrow to in-
terview students interested in join-
ing the Naval Cadet program o1
the Naval Officer's Candidate pro-
gram.
The Naval Cadet program is op-
en to single men between 18 and
25 years of age who have complet-
ed at least 60 hours of college work.
Following a one-year training
period cadets will be commissioned
ensigns in the Naval Reserve and,
or second lieutenants in the Mar-
ine Corps Reserve, serving a period
of two years on active duty.
A lieutenant from the Office o:
Naval Reserve Procurement in De.
troit will also be at the Union to
interview students interested in
the officer candidate program.
Requirements for this program
call for college graduates between
the ages of 19 and 27. After fou
months of training candidates wil
.be commissioned as ensigns in th
Naval Reserve and serve thre
years active duty in various
branches of naval operations.
Econ Club To Mee
"Some Aspects of Unincorpor-
ated Business Behavior" will be
discussed at the first fall meeting
of the Economics Club at 8 p.m,
tomorrow in Rackham Amphi
theater.

TneatedrStudents K ote
With Hammer andPuint
V.. ~ ~ .~.It takes more than acting to make a theater major.
ZT' Around play production time in the Speech Department workshop,
-it is evident that much more is involved than the lines that come
f ,across the footlights.
IN THE THEATER workshop of the Temporary Classroom Bldg.
amid a chaos of paint, cardboard and wood shavings, students are able
to experience the work behind greasepaint glamour. Here acting is
done with hammer and nails. By building sets, sewing costumes, up-
holstering chairs and making false noses speech students get a taste
of backstage detail.
The important feature of the Speech Department's program
is that a student majoring in theater is able to go through the
: V 4complete development of a production-fuom the written script
S::.>and bare stage up to the carefully prepared result.

a''

I

-Daily-Don Campbell
WARTIME PLAYMATES MEET AGAIN ON CAMPUS
Union Opera Director Evans
Will Arrive Here Tomorrow

s
a
d
f
0
1
e
,e
s
t
i.

The girl in jeans on a ladder
may be Empress of the Byzantines
the next evenng. And even though
' a tyro set designer never plans to
act, a few scenes in the limelight
give him a better theater back-
ground.
Set designers, with paint-
streaked hands as their badge of
honor, can take satisfaction in
being the unsung heros of the the-
ater. In the Speech Department,
however, it is the status quo for
everyone.

f
4

* * *

BROCADE FOR ON-STAGE SPLENDOR

Fred Evans, New York director
who will lead this year's Union
Opera "Up 'n' Atom" will arrive
here tomorrow morning to begin
work on the production.
Promotions chairman Fritz Glo-
ver, '55E, said yesterday final de-
cisions on the composition of the
cast have been pending Evans' ar-
rival. Glover also said specialty
acts may try out for the Opera
starting at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday.
Director of the Opera for the

past three years, Evans brings to
Ann Arbor a knowledge of musical
comedies culled from a long career
with showmen such as Florenz
-Ziegfield and Mike Todd. He help-
ed George M. Cohan stage "Rosa-
lie" and "Rosie O'Grady."
In recent years, Evans has been
connected with show business from
one corner of the country to the
other. He has directed musical
comedies in many of the nation's
largest cities.

p 1

COLLEGE SHOP
Anne Fogarty

HOLD STILL!

A DAILY
PICTURE
FEATURE

ARTIST AMID POTPOURRI OF PROPS

Story by
Debra Durchslag

makes' headline

news

with these

new wools

Of all the wonderful things

Anne

:. Fogarty has done this fall, we pick
these wools as the newest and most
exciting. Note the simplicity of the
very full-skirted dress shown at the
top . . . It's in a blue-green novel
basket-weave wool . . three-quarter
length sleeves . . * leather belt to
:7 match: 39.95 . . . next, a wool tweed
. jersey dress: comes in red, dusty rose,
chartreuse and blue tweed . . . arm-
:.. :;. hugging long sleeves: 39.95 ... Last,
. . .. , 4hut very, very new . . an oriental
.........paisley design on magenta (a delight-
ful Sunday dress) in an 85% wool,
15% silk fabric: 59.95 . . . See these
and many more in our fine collection
of Anne Fogarty's.
Junior Sizes
DRESSES - TWIN PARLORS
SECOND FLOOR

THE UPPER LEVEL OF SET DESIGNING ON LOCATION WITH THE STAGE CREW

I

TIM-:

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