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October 23, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
TAKE IT AWAY:
Senstius Sees Waste Disposal Answer

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1953

- -

x By DAVID KAPLAN THE PROFESSOR became fa-
Ann Arbor's garbage disposal miliar with this practice when ne
problem may shortly be solved as was in Great Britain .and the Ne-

a result of a two-month European
trip taken by Prof. Maurice W.
Senstius of the geology depart-
ment.
Prof. Senstius advocates that
Ann Arbor adopt the garbage dis-
posal method used in The .Hague.
A soil specialist, he has recom-
mended that local garbage be
transported some distance away
and left there.

therlands this summer to "study
nature and man."
In the past Ann Arbor's En-
gineers and Public Works De-
partment had the garbage re-
moved from the city and fed to
pigs. Now, however, a state law
requires that all garbage be
cooked to remove harmful para-
sites. Cooking garbage helps the
hogs, but far from solves the
municipal problem.

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It was once customary to dig
trenches in outlying districts and
fill them with the refuse. Trench
areas, however, are soon exhaust-
ed. After extensive study of the
same problem in The Hague, Prof.
Senstius came up with his answer,
pending the City Council's' approv-
al.
The Hague sends its garbage to
an area 200 miles away from the
city: one with sandy soils and an
abundant water supply.
There it is processed under nat-
ural conditions (fermentation and
decomposition) which will disin-
tegrate it into humus, the mater-
ial so essential for productive and
profitable agriculture.
PROF. SENSTIUS explained
that the Waterloo area, twenty
miles from Ann Arbor, is so ex-
tensive and useful that it would
permit both Ann Arbor and Ypsi-
lanti to dump wastes there.
The City Council has not yet
decided what is to be done, but
Prof.Senstius has prepared sev-
eral talks which he will present
to the Council.
Although research on garbage
disposal was the chief objective of
Prof. Stensius' European trip, he
was able also to further his stu-
dies in the characteristics and1
utilization of the soil.
"Dutch soil," he said, "proved a
valuable testing ground for study-1
ing former sea bottoms, and de-
termining the effect of deposited
refuse on thq soil."
Hillel To Hea'
KitchenSpeak'
Wilmer Kitchen, Executive Se-
cretary of the World University
Service, will discuss its functions'
tonight at Hill Auditorium follow-
ing Hillel's Sabbath Services,:
which will begin at 7:45 p.m.
The University .World service,
formerly known as the N.S.S.F.,
aids students financially, finds
jobs for them, and has built youth
hostels throughout the world. The
main' office of the 32 national
branches of the organization is in
Geneva, Switzerland.
Hillel's Community Services will
be held at 9 a.m. tomorrow.
Dennison To Talk
In Visitor's Series'
"Our Dusty Universe," a talk byi
Edwin W. Dennison, graduate stu-
dent in astronomy, will be given
at 7:30 p.m. today in Rm. 2003;
Angell Hall.
The lecture is one in a "Visitor's
Night" series sponsored by the as-
tronomy department.I

Tau Beta's
Made Guides
Tau Beta Pi's thirty-five pled-
ges, recognizable by gold lapel em-
blems, have been assigned posi-
tions as guides and assistants at
the Engineering Centennial cele-
bration to be held this week-end.
Other pledge duites of the na-
tional engineering honorary in-
clude the learning of certain in-
formation about the Society and
writing a 500 word'essay on a non-
technical subject. The winning es-
say will be awarded $5 in a na-
tional contest.
Tau Beta Pi alumni will be
honored at a breakfast given by
the local chapter on Saturday at
8 a.m. Delegates from the frater-
nity's chapters will vote at a na-
tional convention this fall on the
question of accepting women mem-
bers on an equal basis with men.
Porter To Give
Talk at Rackhaim
Prof. Katherine Ann Porter, no-
ted novelist and visiting professor
in English at the University, will
speak at 8 p.m. today in the Rack-
ham Amphitheatre.
The lecture, open to the public, 1
is sponsored by Sociedad Hispan-
ica.

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BEAT IT OVER
to the
LITTLE (toe
TONIGHT
C GA9-12
MICHIGAN UNION

-Daily-Don Campbell
PULVERIZER AT WORK-Leaf-grinding machines such as this
one are producing a fine powder from fallen leaves all over cam-
pus, much to the dismay of women students who find that the
dust's effect necessitates frequent shampoos.
Campus Ground Cret
.busy Clearing Leaves
Women students have recently another three or four days to get
been voicing complaints concern- it started again.
ing the plant department's leaf- With the possibility of a sudden
removing activities around cam- cold spell, the heat must be kept
pus. on from the week after Labor Day
Dust from leaf-cutting ma- to the week after Memorial Day.
chines used in cleaning up Uni-1
versity lawns, according to these This long period of heated
coeds, has drastically changed buildigs tends to cover most of
their shampooing schedules. the colder days during the semes-
ters, yet the unseasonal weather
SUPERINTENDENT of t at present seems to have thrown
plant department W. M. Roth ex- -verything out of kilter.
plained that the, leaf particles
"will, through decomposition and
moisture, be turned into humus
and are to enrich the soil."
He said the task of removal by
any other means would cost more.'
The plant department alsorhas
the job of trimming trees to in-
sure proper growth. Several
cases of elm disease were re-
ported in Ann Arbor last year.
The elm trees on campus are
being watched for dead limbs, ac-
cording to Roth, for that is where
the disease begins. The bugs at- DELICIOUS
tack the dead limbs and coitinue
on to kill the whole tree. Ham burgers
With winter on its way, the un-
derground sprinklers in the Law and
Quad and around the League are CHEESEBURGERS
being drained.
The pipes are not winter-proof,
and the water must be drained BEER - WI N E
out of them in order to prevent TV - SHUFFLEBOARD
freezing and splitting of the pipes.
In the near future, the fountain
alongside the League will be shut Dinners
off'and covered for the winter. 4:30 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.
* * *
THE PLANT Department also
has an explanation for the heat 7
in campus buildings. Because of IEGLER S
the extensive heating system used
on campus, it is a three-to-four 1
day process for the single building
supplying the steam heat to warm 120 WEST LIBERTY
up the sectional system Closed Mondays
If, because of a change in
weather, the buildings get too

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