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October 18, 1953 - Image 15

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-10-18

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SUNI)A T, OCTOBER. 19, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGIT SEV X

SU?~DAY, OCTOBER iR, 1 9 5 3 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

MICHIGAN TECHNIC:

Extension Courses Offered A LINE ON '':

ProvesOldest Publication on Campus For Off-Campus Engineers

I t"° 7 --

-mr-v "M A-V

Student Surveyors Explore Campus

The Michigan Technic is tlhe
oldest publication on campus and
is recognized by the trade as a
leader in its specialized field.
Founded in 1882, the Technic is
the oldest college engineering pub-
lication in the country and the
official publication of engineering
undergraduates.
PROVIDING news on the latest
happenings in engineering and
scientific fields, the monthly pub-
lication has consistently ranked
among the best college engineer-
ing publications in the country.
A member of the Engineering
College Magazine Association,
the Technic recently won first
place in the association's annual
"Best Student Article" competi-
tion,
Once merely an assemblage of
dry technical abstracts, the Tech-
nic today encourages technical
articles written in such a way so
as to make them readable and
interesting for the general public.
For this reason although the mag-
azine is intended primarily for en-
gineers and engineering students,
it has come to be known as a pub-
lication useful to the novice as
well.
* * * -
ARTICLES by students, faculty
members, alumni and leading in-
dustrialists on the latest happen-
ings in the engineering field and
recent trends and thought in en-
gineering education are, featured
in every issue.
This month's issue will be de-
voted to the engineering col-
lege's centennial celebration. It
will feature the past, present
and future of the engineering
college.
As a sidelight to the Technic's
activities during the spring, the
magazine traditionally sponsors
the engineering college dance
"Slide Rule Ball."
STRUGGLE for possession of a
giant slide rule, symbolic of the
} engineering is a highlight of the
dance.
At this annual event, law stu-
dents traditionally Invade fes-

"No jokes or other such gim- Prof. Arthur Lean of the Uni-
micks are necessary in the off- versity Extension Service said
campus engineeringtclasses," said that many of the large indus-
Prof. Thomas Hunter of the en- tries try to increase the effi-
gineering college who has been ciencyof their staffs by organ-
teaching University Extension Ser- izing and paying for courses
vice classes in Detroit and Sag- for them.
inaw for three years."r
"The problem of motivation" There is a great demand, he
he continued, "that a professor continued, for courses on televi-
faces in University classes is nill sion. Television repairmen andI
among the adults who take engi- owners of retail television stores
neering courses offered by the realize the growing importance of
Service throughout Michigan, and this medium and the constant
there is no necessity to lead the necessity of knowing even more
horse to water." than their present jobs require,
Another difference professor he said.
Hunter noted is that while Uni- * * *
versity classes are homogeneous OF THE 15,000 off-campus stu-
the groups who take extension dents who take Extension courses
courses range from men who have and of whose existence most Uni-
never completed grammar school versity students are unaware, 500
to graduate engineers. are Engineering students.

By JOEL BERGER Barbour Gym and the Engin Arch
After surveying the campus high of eight or nine feet, although your
and low since the beginning of the senses would have you think that
semester, students in the engi- North University is straight as

neering college's surveying coursesj
are laying down their transits and
returning to inside classes.
During the first weeks of school,
the students in these classes be-
come a familiar sight to students.
They could be found on any Mon-
day, Wednesday or Friday after-
noon practically anywhere on
campus, from Engin Arch to
Women's Dorms.
* * *
ONE OF THE first things learn-
ed by the engineers was that in
surveying, the senses should never
be trusted. For example, Prof.
Harold J. McFarlan of the engi-
neering college said, "there is a
difference in elevation between

an arrow."1
Observatory Hill was a popu-
lar spot with the embryo survey-
ors early in the term. Girls, at
first startled to see strange men
with telescopes mounted on tri-
pods-levels, to those in the
know-grew accustomed to the
men making strange hand signs
and gazing at posts-leveling
rods-behind their dorms.
These students were engrossed
in finding the difference in eleva-
tion between the instrument room
in the West Engineering building
and a fire hydrant on Obseryatory
Hill.
s * s
WHEN FINISHED, they were

expected to have the difference in
elevation correct to a hundredth
of a foot.
It was not until afterwards
that they were informed that
the information could have
been supplied them by the city
engineer's office.
The level, consisting of a tele-
scope equipped with apparatus to
make it perfectly horizontal, is
mounted on a tripod. Through
this the surveyor looks at a pole,
the leveling rod, held by another
student. The rod is measured off
in hundredths of a foot.
s s
THE FIGURE seen on the sur-
veying rod tells the surveyor the
difference in elevation between his
telescope and the point on the lev-
eling rod.

~ ___._. __ ..,_t.. .,..,

.. ...,J ."v..v

_ii _ __ _

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
WORKING TO MEET DEADLINE
* * * * *: *

tivities in an effort to capture
the symbolic rule, or at any rate
to disrupt proceedings.
Completely student operated,
Editor-in-Chief of the Technic is

Robert N. Costant, '55E; Associat-
ed Editor, Margie Mauer, 54E;
Managing Editor, Chuck Stickles,
'55E and Business Manager, Lar-
ry Mack, 54E.

1111

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ANN ARBOR'S FINEST
South German Style Kitchen
Beer and Wine
120 W. Washington Phone 9254

l!

MflY WE EXTEND OUR

BE

S

T WI

S

HES

TO

THE

I

ENGINEERING

SCHOOL

ON
ITS 100th ANNIVERSARY

,,

SALUTES

The University of Michigan
Engineering College
on this 100th Anniversary
We recognize and appreciate the splendid job our American Engineering
Colleges are doing. In our industry;so much depends upon the well-qualified,
well-trained engineer.
In Peacetime-as well as in times of emergency-the design, development
and production of Allison products require a large engineering staff.
Presently, there are 40 University of Michigan graduates helping with the
advanced engineering work now going on at Allison, in Indianapolis and
Dayton, Ohio.
Maybe you,,too, want to consider an engineering career at ALLISON. Why
not plan to talk it over with the Allison representative when he visits the Michi-
gan campus. Or, write now: R. G. Greenwood, Engineering College Contact,
Allison Division, General Motors Corporation, Indianapolis 6, Indiana.
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BUR

MfiCHINE

TOOL COMPNY
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

DESIGNERS

AND BUILDERS

OF HIGH

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'I~I . I~I

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