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October 18, 1953 - Image 10

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-10-18

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 18, 19

I

Colorful Research

Men Taught!
In Nuclear
ngineering1
By FREDDI LOWENBERG
Training in the special tech-
niques and skills of nuclear engi-
neering will be offered for the first
time this year by the College ofI
Engineering.
The eight courses, which have
been designed to train engineersI
to fill the jobs made available by
rapid developments in the appli-'
cation of nuclear energy will offer
instruction in three fields:

....._._........._...._..

King-Sized Chemistry PHILOSOPHY OF LIVING:

'S

Honor System Prepares for Future

i

WATCHING PATTERNS-Prof. Moore experiments with his rela-
tively common-place equipment, looking into the variations of
flow patterns sustained by magnetic, electrostatic, heat and elec-
tric fields under different conditions.
F1luis Map Energy
Flws in Patterns

1) The development of atomic
energy for the generation of
power and electricity. Nuclear
powered aircraft are among the
new developments expected in
this field.
2) The use of radiation, in
chemical processing and in the
preservation of food.
3) The use of tracers, which is
a method of obtaining informa-
tion on the structure and func-
tion of a system by adding radio-
active materials to it.
To qualify for the new courses,
an applicant must have a degree
in any of the fields of engineer-
ing. The curriculum is designed
to lead to the degree of Master of
Science in Nuclear Engineering,
with work toward the doctorate
also being offered.
THE PROGRAM is adminis-
tered by the Committee on Nu-
clear Engineering with Prof. Hen-
ry J. Gomberg serving as Chair-
man.
One of the first to experiment
in atomic energy, the Univer-
sity has facilities which feature
a privately financed research
center in radiation that is one
of the largest 'in the country.
It will be further enlarged with
the completion of the Phoenix
project building on the new North
Campus. In addition, a nuclear
reactor, or "pile" for research and
teaching will be built.
* * *

f
1

By DOROTHY MYERS
A complete absence of proctors
is the earmark of the College of!
Engineering examinations.
An occasional tapping of a pen-
cil has been the only "observer"
during engineering college tests
for the past 37 years, during which
time a strict honors system has
been enforced.
* * *
CALLED "a philosophy of liv-
ing" by Engineering Honors Coun-
cil President Tawfiq Khoury,
'55E, the honors system is run en-
tirely by students and is independ-
ent of the college's administration
and faculty.
Main job of the honors coun-
cil, Khoury explained, is to edu-
cate freshmen and transfer
students into the system. "Af-
ter an engineer graduates, he
must make decisions on his own
without a textbook," Khoury
continued, "so the system incor-
poratessuch 'honesty to oneself'
Into it."
After a year of orientation into
the system through publicity and
orientation-week lectures, he said,
students become proud enough of
it so that it is rarely disobeyed.
If a student ever notices an
1

examination-mate cheating in any
way, Khoury, explained that two
methods of stopping such an oc-
currence are possible. First the
observer begins tapping with his
pencil on the desk-top. If such
action fails to stop the student,
the observer writes what he has
noticed in the bluebook to be
turned in to the professor.
* * *
OFFENDERS are tried by the
honors council, which then makes
recommendations for suitable ac-
tion on the case to the faculty.
Punishments vary from a simple
warning to the student to in-
definite suspension. "In all cases

that I have studied," Khourisaid,
"the administration has never
overturned a decision of the coun-
cil."
"Due to the success of the pro-
gram," he added, "only two
cases were brought before the
council last year."
The eight council members are
chosen for alternating one-year
terms. Four students are chosen
each semester by the previous
council on the basis of petitions
and interviews of candidates.
One ex-officio member is as-
signed to the council by Vulcans,
engineering honor society,

A

-Daily-Don Campbell
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS-Students learn in the chemical and
metallurgical departments the basic skills necessary for speciali-
zation in their field. Giant sized machinery and careful calcula-
tion are pre-requisites for study and research.

,'

By JANET FORDI
Food coloring, kitchen pans,c
dental stone, potassium perm an-r
ganate, beaver board, rubberized
crib sheeting, water and rubber
tubing are the implements and
ingredients used in an intricateI
process called "fluid mapping"c
which was perfected by Prof. A.I
D. Moore of the electrical engi-r
neering dept.c
For five years, Prof. Moore hast
been demonstrating his method oft
simulating with water the forcest
of magnetic and electrostatic fieldsc
and heat and electric flow pat-
terns at numerous colleges, engi-
neering institutes and industrial
and government research centers.
FOUR PIECES of notched beav-
er board and a large rectangular
piece of water-proof sheeting
make a good portable tray that hee
uses in demonstrating his method
of fluid mapping while traveling.
A slab made of dental stonec
and containing one or more
holes, Is lowered into the trayI
of water. Rubber tubing from
each of the holes or wells is
connected to a small supply
tank that can be manipulated
with the hand..
By lowering the tanks beneath
the water level in the tray, Prof.
Moore is able to make water flow
over the slab, through the wells
and out of the pan into the tanks.'
POTASSIUM - permanganate
crystals sprinkled over the plaster
slab dissolve when the water flows
into the wells and form patternst
that have proved useful in solvingt
problems in physics, reservoir en-I
gineering and electrocardiography. t
An Infinite variety of flow pat-E
terns can be created by chang-
ing the shape and number of
wells in slabs or by changing
the shape of the slab itself.
Prof. Moore can also alter the
flow lines by putting metal or rub-
ber obstructions in the wells or
on the slab.
OVER A HALF century ago, an
English scientist, Hele-Shaw, dem-
onstrated that colored water flow-
ing over a slab revealed that its
currents exactly duplicated the
movement of electricity, magnetic
force, heat and air.
But Shaw's techniques were
expensive and complex and his
apparatus inflexible, so his work
died.
His interest in Shaw's work and
his own experiments in fluid flow
which have led to the success of
Engineers Get
New Machine
A broaching machine was re-
cently given to the College of
Engineering.
The machine, a tool for shaping
holes and making flat surfaces,
will be used in the production en-
gineering department.
FOR SIX MONTHS, the produc-
tion engineering department did
research for the government. The
engineers studied methods of
broaching titanium, a metal im-
portant to the production of mod-
ern high-speed jet aircraft, for
the Watertown Arsenal in Massa-
chusetts.

his "fluid mappers" stem from a
childhood fascination in water'
movement, the professor explain-
ed.
* * *
SHORTLY AFTER beginning
his experiments in fluid flow, he
discovered that dental stone, a
hard plaster used by dentists to
make models of artificial teeth,
could be successfully used to make
the mapping slabs if diluted to
the consistency of pancake bat-
ter. It is inexpensive and hardens
quickly.
Prof. Moore uses ordinary
kitchen baking pans to mix his
"batter." So far his process has
consumed over a quarter ton of
the plaster.

transportation
Library Sees
Past of Travel
In the Transportation Library
is kept a record of the past and
present of America's second larg-
est industry, transportation.
Collected from many sources,
and especially helpful to engineer-
ing students, the material consists'
of books, pamphlets, maps, early:
correspondence and prints con-
cerning transportation from its
earliest beginnings. It is one of
the largest general collections in
the country.
* * *
AMONG THE prints are rare
pictures and advertisements of
early transportation companies,
which together with a large col-
lection of Currier and Ives usually
adorn the walls of the library
located in the East Engineering

Compliments of
HAWTHORNE
PAPER COMPANY
Manufacturers of
Fine Quality Papers
KALAMAZOO, MICH.

a
I
iti "
k
;x
ti }
'AI

CONGRATULATIONS
TO THE
UNIVERSITY of MICHIGAN
ENGINEERING SCHOOL
ON A
"century of dynamic ss"

4

I

t

E;

FROM THE

A

WOLVERINE

A

ROOFING SUPPLY

BECAUSE at present practical
experience in work with nuclear
reactors can be obtained only
through government laboratories,j
arrangements have been made

2195 E. ELLSWORTH RD.

I

Food coloring is added to water with the Argonne National Labor- Bldg.
in the tanks to make more inter- atories and the Oak Ridge Labora- The library, started in 1923,
esting and colorful flow patterns. tory to place students in these was established and built up
* places. mainly by the work of Prof.
THE SCIENTIST recently dis- In addition to teaching duties John S. Worley who retired in
covered a method of making the staff members are carrying on 1946.
flow lines on the slabs permanent several research projects. In Not only does the Transporta-
by paintig the wct plaster slab the atomic energy lab Prof. tion Library serve as a reference
with a new paint - a synthetic Gomberg is studying the bio- library in historical, technical and
rubber emulsion in water. logical effects of radiation, while legal aspects of all branches of
The purple potassium crystals Prof. Lloyd E. Brownell is study- transportation for graduate and
are sprinkled on the freshly ing use of energy from waste fis- undergraduate University stu-
painted slab and dissolve to sion products in the fission pro- dents, but inquiries are received
form the flow patterns in the ducts lab. from all parts of the country for
usual way. Working on computers and ma- information relating to transpor-
chine techniques for making cal tation problems early as well as
A chemical' reaction between culations is Prof. Lawrence L. modern.j
the dissolved crystals and the Rauch. Prof. William Kerr has * * *
paint permanently etches the recently described a new type of QUESTIONS have been received
lines into the slab. microscope, and is at present from the movie industry, authors,
Prof. Moore said that he en- working on new devices for meas- lawyers and even from a large
joys the colorful flow patterns urement and detection of radia- auto manufacturing plant who
from an artistic as well as scien- tion. asked "the color of the wheels of
tific point of view. He hopes that Civil engineering problems in- Napoleon's state coach." The li-
someday the aesthetic value of volving plant design and disposal brary has pictures of this coach
his "fluid mappers" can be put to of radioactive waste materials are but was unable to furnish the
use, perhaps in occupational ther- being figured out by Prof. Jack A. answer as the prints were in black
apy. Borschardt. and white.

ANN ARBOR

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w

9
4

-1853

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_______ __ * 1

'Our most sincere CONGRATULATIONS to the
ENGINEERING COLLEGE of the University
of Michigan on its 100th ANNIVERSARYl."
KING -SEELEY,
CORPORf4TION

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY

i

Indeed, it is with great pleasure that
we wish the Engineering School of
The University of Michigan a happy
anniversary . ..
:A century of progress in engineering
is an enviable record and to be able
to join in celebrating such an occa-
sion is a distinct privilege.

i

r

RNN ARBOR +.MICHIGAN

4

Iiii

10

Manufacturers of Automotive Instruments, instrument Clusters,
Speedometers and Governors; Interval Timers for Stoves and
Washing Machines; Portable Electrical Appliances.

_,

III

WHI

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