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October 08, 1953 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-10-08

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

_ ,.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER S, 1953

JOURNALISM OPEN HOUSE:
Foreign Newsmen Relate Journalistic Experiences

Market ClubI
To See FilmI

i

By HAROLD HORWITZ
"The journalist will end up doing
anything."
This old French proverb quoted
by Dutch Correspondent and Ful-
bright scholar, Edmond Lachman,
is indicative of the European and
Asian attitude toward the journal-
ism profession.
SPEAKING at the journalism
department open house last night,
Lachman, along with four other
foreign newspapermen studying at
the University, gave accounts of
his newspaper experiences.
The correspondent of the Al-
gemeen Handlesblad described
his Job as a, grueling and diffi-
cult one. He added however that
the rewards are great because of
the interesting people he meets.

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George Yackoub, editor of Al
Shaab, a leading Baghdad daily,
stated that his native city is far
different from the popular movie
versions. Despite many new im-
provements, the city as a whole is
greatly underdeveloped.
Yackoub said that the newspa-
pers in Baghdad lack the great
amount of freedom that American
newspapers have.
"I could tell the national situa-
tion by the pricenaf cigarettes
stated Greek journalist Lefteri
Adan. Adan, who was interned in
a Nazi Concentration camp during
the war, had no contact with the
outside world except for a cigarette
salesman who stood outside his jail
window.
"When the price, of cigarettes
which was very inflated at the
time dropped from a trillion to a
billion, I knew the Allies were do-
ing well."
Liaison en
Vsit Today
Two members of the Air Uni-
versity's Liaison Group fropi Airj
Force ROTC headquarters in
Montgomery, Ala:, will spend three'
days on campus beginning today
to observe the Air Force ROTC's:
activities. Capt. Eugene C. Max-
am, professor in air science and
tactics, revealed yesterday.
The two men, Col. Lewis Ti.1
,nsinwer and Ma or Crtiss P.
fTitscl Jr., coinprisc a team which
visits the University seve-ral timges
during the year to observe the
unit's facilities
During their visit the me'i will
t-1k to University ' ninistrativel
oiicials in conice'io i i the
Air Force ROTC's st nnn; in the
country and any improvements
vrhich might be needed.
The visit will also give Univer-
sity officials an opportunity to get
iformation they miht need on
current trends in instruction and
any changes in the Air Force RO-
TC policy from the higher com-
mand.
CariPo Ce rt xt1
Slated for Today
Music selections including folk,
songs and contemporary carillon
pieces composed by Staf Nees wills
be heard at 7:15 p.m. today when'
Sidney F. Giles, assistant Univer-
sity carillonneur, presents anoth-
er of his evening concerts.S

On Selling
The Student Marketing Club's
first meeting of the semester will
get under way with the showing of
a 19 minuJe movie, "The Import-
ance of Selling" at 3 p.m. today
in Rm. 130 Business Administra-
tion Bldg.
The film describes the structure
of typical sales organizations and
illustrates the importance of sell-
ing in the American society.
Business on the club's agenda
for today's meeting includes elec-
tions of officers to fill vacancies
and an introduction of the busi-
ness administration school's fac-
ulty to club members.
The club functions in coopera-
tion with the American Marketing
Association. It's purpose according
to Harry Blum, '54BAd, is to foster
scientific study and research in
the field of marketing.
All students interested in mar-
keting are invited, to attend the
meeting.
Torch Drive,
To Begin Soon
With the goal of collecting $40,-
000, more than 1,500 volunteers
will canvass the entire Ann Arbor
area next Thursday evening in a
drive for the Community Chest.
The solicitors will come calling
between 7 and 10 p.m. in an effort
to repeat last year's highly suc-
cessful one-day drive.
Residential leader Stephen Fili-
piak said yesterday that the drive
could still use about 2,000 more
volunteers.

Williams
Plans State
Fire Confab
LANSING-(zP)-Gov. Williams
disclosed plans yesterday for a
state conference on industrial fire
prevention as a result of the dis-
astrous $60,000,000 fire at General
Motors Transmission plant in Li-
vonia.
The conference planning was
assigned to a committee headed by
W. 0. Hildebrand, secretary of
the Michigan Association of In-
surance Agents, and composed of
State Police Com. Joseph A.;
Childs, State Fire Marshal Ar-
nold C. Renner, State Insurance
Com. Joseph A. Navarre and State
Labor Com. John Reid.

STORI ES
POETRY
ART
MUSIC
DEADLINE OCTOBER 30
First Floor, Student Publications Bldg.
y . . " :*,::"

generation
IS NOW ACCEPTING

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IMMlOM"i

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-Daily-Betsy Smith
FOREIGN JOURNALISM STUDENTS HOLD PANEL DISCUSSION
- ?

LUNAR TRIPS:
U' Experts, de Seversky
Agree on Atomic Future
By JOAN SARFIN copters in everyday life. "The ne-
University experts agree that cessity for traveling short dis-
the trips to the moon, atomic tances will always be with us," he
planes and family helicopters pre- I pointed out. He feels that the use;
dicted by Maj. Alexander P. de of ground transportation such as
Seversky, noted author, inventor, the automobile will still be of con-
designer and pilot might well be siderable importance.
realities of the future. * * .

Senior Pies
Representatives from the
'Ensian will be on the "Diag"
to sign up seniors who have not
made arrangements for their
senior pictures from 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. today.
According to 'Ensian officials,
those who have not already
signed up for their pictures
should do so immediately.

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:;

lRead and Use
Daily Classifieds

Major de Eeversky, who had
much to do with the beginnings of
aviation, claims that flying to the
moon will only be a matter of 3
hours thanks to atomic-powered
craft. Rockets are not practical,
he says, betause the pilot cannot
control the speed.
THE ATOMIC plane will start
relatively slowly and travel
through the earth's atmosphere at
a speed of 1 .000 to 2.000 miles pnr
hour, tne author said. When clear
of the atmos here, it will increase
its speed to 130.000 miles per hour,
then slow Down during the sec-
ond half of the journey.
Maj. de Seversky also predicts
thc use of atoic- owered
cormerc1'l planes, belicopters
cheaper than i ay's lowest pric-
ed car, and pilotless guided mis-
siles traveling at supersonic
speeds.
Prof. William Liller of the as-
tronomy denartment however not-
ed several problems which must
be solved before an attempt at the
moon is made.
COLLISION with interplanetaryj
particles (such as meteors) is one
important factor. Also to be con-
sidered he pointed out will be the
lack of air on the moon and theI
extreme temperature variation
which would make landing impos-
sible.
Prof. Liller, who has spent a
year photographing shooting
stars near the White Sands!
Proving Grounds, said that
atomic fuels would certanly be
more convenient in space travel,
since they take up less space and
weight.
Prof. Henry Gomberg of the
electrical engineering department
was also in agreement with the
principles of Maj. de Seversky.
However, Prof. Gomber, who is
assistant director of the Michigan
Memorial Phoenix Project, is
skeptical about the use of heli-

DEAN RALPH SAWYER, of the;
Rackham School of Graduate
studies and director of the Michi-
gan Memorial - Phoenix Project,
said that atomic planes are, tech-
nically possible, and that it is r-
ther a question of whether such
things are economically possible.
"I hope that I never see the dayj
when helicopters are as common
as autos," he added.
Prof. Wilbur Nelson of the
aeronautical enineering de-
partencnt prefered to look at
Maj. de Seversky's statements
from what he considered a more
practical viewpoint.
Prof. Nelson predicted the in-
terlocking of transportation net-
works through the use of helicop-
ters. Helicouters now fly from
downtown Detroit to down-town
Chicago.
A helicopter shuttle service is
expected within aA few years link-'
ing -downtown sections of large
cities to suburban airports. A great
deal of time and money is going
into this work, he said.
The trend in commercial air
travel, he claimed, is to fly higher'
and faster, the effect being a saf-
er flight. Prof. Nelson feels that
within five years the speed and al-
titude of commercial planes will
be doubled. However, he said that
"at the present time it does not
seem feasible to transport large
numbers of people or freight at
supersonic speeds."
Houston To Speak
On Stone Carving
James A. Houston, Arctic rep-
resentative of the Canadian Han-
dicraft Guild, will speak at 4:15
p.m. today on "Eskimo Stone Car-
vers" in Auditorium A, Angell Hall.
The lecture, under the auspices
of the Department of Archeology
and the Museum of Art, is given
in connection with the exhibition
"Eskimo Stone Carving" now dis-
played in Alumni Memorial Hall.
Union To Resell
Football Tickets
Non-student tickets for the
Michigan-Iowa game Saturday
may be turned in from 3 to 5 p.m.
today and tomorrow in the Union
student offices for resale Satur-
day morning.
Tickets will be sold on a first-
come, first-served basis.

gives
* University
Daily Official Bulletin
* Associated Press World News
* Complete Campus Coverage
*AND MORE
And It's All Yours For
Just
for the School Year
Call 2-3241

4 1

eekmend Activities
tH IL LE L
Thursxday, Oct. 8, 8:00 P.M.-"Music For All"
Classical Music on Hi Fi sound system
Friday, Oct. 9, 6:00 P.M.-Kosher Meal
7:45 P.M.-Evening Services followed by an
Oneg Shabet sponsored by IZFA
Saturday, Oct. 10, 4:00 P.M.-Football open house,
followed by a Hovdalah service
Sunday, Oct. 11, 10:30 A.M.-Hillel Student Council
Meeting
6:00 P.M.-Supper Club
8:00 P.M.-Hillel Chorus Meeting
8:00 to 10:30 P.M.-Grad-get-together
REGISTRATION STILL OPEN for classes in Jewish
History, Hebrew, and Modern Dance. Membership
on the Music, Education, and Publicity committees
is open.
HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Phone 3-4129

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Student Supplies
TYPEWRITERS
REPAIRED
RENTED
/ SOLD
BOUGHT
Fountain Pens repaired by
a factory trained man.
Webster-Chicago
Tape and Wire Recorders
MORRI LL'S
314 S. State Ph. 7177
Open Sat. 'til 5 P.M. except on
Home Games-Open 'til 12 Noon

I

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7/*

Fine
Topcoats
in TWEEDS
and GABARDINES

$3500

and up

Genuine Imported
HARRIS TWEED
$4950
IN ALL NEW SHADES

Your best buy
is BALFOUR
F ty
Fraternity-Sorority jewelry,

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