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October 06, 1953 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-10-06

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1953

--- I - =no

ON TRAIL SINCE 1946:
'U Baeteriologists Find
Possible TB Preventive

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

.

On the frustrating trail of the
tuberculosis bug since 1946, a teama
of University bacteriologists has
announced the possibility of a
new and more reliable immunity
serum against TB.
As a means of preventing onset{
of the disease, the serum has been,
tested on rats, mice and guinea1
pigs with positive results. Human,
experiments, however, remain for
the future.
EQ Men Sing
To Sororities
Singing "Where oh where are
the East Quad pledges," a group1
of East Quadrangle men descend-
ed on Kappa Kappa Gamma and!
Delta Gamma sorority houses1
Sunday night.
The serenade, described as af
"retaliatory measure" by Strauss
House resident director Bob Bak-
er, '55L, was termed "not bad" by
reasonably appreciative Kappas.
The midnight concert followed
a Sunday afternoon appearance'
of Kappa and Delta Gamma mem-
bers outside their houses across
the street from the East Quad. 1
The sorority women broke the
afternoon stillness by singing
"Where oh where are the Kappa
pledges" to welcome their pledges
to a meeting.
The Kappas had only one com-
plaint. Their attempts to sing1
back to the serenaders brought1
boos and hisses.j
The staid law students of DeltaE
Theta Phi, next door to the Kappaj
house, agreed the musical out-
burst was alright in quality, but
commented that the repertoire of4
the quadders seemed somewhat
limited.

WORKING IN conjunction with
Donald W. Smith of the bacteri-
ology department and bacteriology
research assistant Albert A. Grov-
er, Dr. Walter J. Nungester, chair-
man of the bacteriology depart-
ment, reported, "We are dragging
our heels and withholding com-
plete findings, because we are not
yet satisfied we have hit on the
most potent ingredient in our
search for TB immunity."
The "ingredient," an antigen
similar to, the gamma globulin
antibody, builds up resistance in
the human body to a point
where the disease itself loses out.
Bacillus Calmette Geurin is cur-
rently the most widely used TB
antigen. Discovered by French
bacteriologists, the vaccine is not
available on the open market.
However, BCG has been used in
hospitals to immunize nurses and
doctors exposed to tubercular pa-
tients.
* * *
RECOGNIZED as a vaccine
which decreases TB mortality
rates, BCG has serious limitations.
As yet no active immunizing agent
against TB has been found to
equal protection against such di-
seases as diphtheria, tetanus, yel
low fever, smallpox and typhoid.
University scientists became
convinced that the best tuber-
culosis antigens are present in
the most virulent strains of the
tubercle bacillus.
The three-man crew also agreed
that certain fractions of this ex-
tremely virulent bacillus, if gently
and properly separated chemically,
would accomplish greater and sa-
fer immunity.
* *
"SINCE BCG is a vaccine made
of living bacillus, certain medical
circles have speculated that one
day it might regain its virility and
begin producing the disease again.
Although highly improbable, this
possibility cannot be entirely ne-
glected," Dr. Nungester said.
For this reason, the scientific
trio began experimenting with
the most virulent TB bacillus
they could find, separating non-
living parts of it.
Professor Emeritus Harrison M.
Randall of the physics department
introduced the use of infra-red
measurements to guide in the pre-
paration of immunizing antigens.
By injecting some of the "frac-
tionated" components of the ba-
cillus into animals, and by expos-
ing the animals to virulent TB
germs,,the scientists have reached
a point where they are satisfied
with their theories.
Rhodes Applicants
To HoldMeeting
A meeting for men interested in
applying for Rhodes Scholarships
will be held at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow
in Rm. 2013 Angell Hall, Prof.
Clark Hopkins of the classical art
department has announced.
The scholarships provide an
opportunity for two-year study in
overseas colleges and universities,
and are awarded o the basis of
literary and scholastic achieve-
ment, personality and athletic
ability.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday).
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1953
VOL. LXIV, No. 13
Notices

University Directory changes of
dress and phone number must be
ported not later than Mon., Oct.

ad-
re-
12.

.r

I
I

AN JERRY
MRTIiNI oEI

Schools of Education, Music, Matural
Resources, and Public Health. Students
who received marks of I, X, or "no
reports" at the end of their last se-
mester or summer session of attend-
ance will receive a grade of "E" in the
course or courses unless this work is
made up by Oct. 21 in the Schools of
Education, Music, and Public Health.
In the School of Natural Resources the
date is Oct. 16. Students wishing an ex-
tension of time beyond this date in
order to make up this work should file
a petition, addressed to the appropriate
official in their school with 1513 Ad-
ministration Building, here it will be
transmitted.
A Director of Student organizationsj
will be issued, listing the name, address,
and telephone of the president of each
organization. To be included in this
publication, it is necessary that organi-
zations be registered on or before Oc-
tober 9. Privileges such as thenuse of
the Daily Official Bulletin and the
use of rooms in University buildings for
meetings and activities will be ex-t
tended only to registered organizations.
Registration forms may be secured in
the Office of Student Affairs, 1020 Ad-
minstratin Building.
Student Sponsored Activities. All ac-l
tivities and projects sponsored or pro-
duced by student organizations must
receive the approval of the Committee
on Student Affairs. Petitions for con-
sideratitn by the Committee should be1
submitted to the Office of Student Af-i
fairs at least two weeks before thej
event is to take place. Request formsi
k may be secured in the Office of Stu-I
dent Affairs, 1020 Administrationj
Building.
Calendaring. Activities must be ca-1
endared to take place before the tenth
day prior to the beginning of a finalf
examination period. Advance reserva-
tion of specific dates for major pro-
jects may be made with the calendar-
ing committee of the Student Legis-
lature in accordance with announce-
ments made by it.
Freshman Testing Program. A make
up session for freshmen who missed
the Kuder Preference Record during
orientation week. Please report to 140p
Business Administration Building at
6:30 p.m., Tues., Oct. 6. The Session
will last until 10:30 p.m. For further
information call Ext. 2297.
Freshman Testing Program. A make-.
up session for freshmen who missed
all of the tests during the orientation
week. Please report to Auditorium B,l
Angell Hall, at 6:30 p.m. on Wed., Oct.
7. The session will last until 10:30 p.m.
Identification Pictures for schools1
and Departments. Those schools andi
departments wishing to order copies
of student identification pictures should
have their requisitions in the Office of
Student Affairs not later than Oct. 20.
Orders received after that date may
take considerably longer to be filled.
Choral Union members are reminded
to pick up their courtesy passes admit-
I ting to the Roberta Peters concert, on
the day of the performance, Wed., Oct.
7-between the hours of 9:30 and 11:30,j
and 1 and 4, at the offices of the Uni-
versity Musical Society in Burton Me-
morial Tower. After 4 o'clock no passes t
will be issued.
Personnel Request. Rem-Cru Titan-
ium, Inc., in Midland, Pa., is interested
in employing 1954 graduates in the fieldsI
of Metallurgical, Mechanical, Indus-
trial, or Electrical Engineering to train
for responsible positions resulting from
the firm's expansion. If enough stu-
dents are interested in these oppor-
tunities, the company will make a trip
to the campus for interviews. Further
information and applications may be
secured at the Bureau of Appointments,
3528 Administration Building, Ext. 371.
Lectures
Lecture by Prof. Sydney Chapman,
auspices Departments of Astronomy,
Aeronautical Engineering, Physics, and
Ge~logy, Tues., Oct. 6, 4 p.m., 1400
Chemistry Building.tTopic: "The Solar
Tide in the Earth's Atmosphere."
Randolph G. Adams Memorial Lec-
ture. "Three Loves Have I," Lawrence C.
Powell, Director of the Library, Uni-
versity of California at Los Angeles,
Tues., Oct. 6, 8:30 p.m., Clements Li-
brary.

Academic Notices
Makeup examination in Economics 51,
I52, 53, and 54 will be given on Fri., Oct.
9, at 3 p.m. in 202bEconomics Building.
Make-up Examinations in History on
Sat., Oct. 10, 9 to 12 M., 2413 Mason Hall,
See your instructor for permission and
then sign list in History Office.
Health Lectures. The remaining lec-
tures of the present series will be giv-
en in the Health Service Lecture Room
instead of Natural Science Auditorium
as prevously announced. The hours
remain the same with- lectures being
repeated at 3, 4, 5, and 7:30 p.m.
The remainder of the schedule is as
follows:
Tues., Oct. 6: Health Hazards of Ci-
vilization.
Thurs., Oct. 8: Injuries, First Atten-
tions and Points of Sanitation.
rues., Oct. 13: Communicable Diseases.
Thurs., Oct. 15: Physical Defects, Or-
gan and Tissue Malfunction.
The examination for those students
who are deficient in the requirement
will be given in half-hour intervals
from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. un Fri., Oct. 16,
in the Health Service Lecture Room.
Logic Seminar will meet on Tues.,
Oct. 6, at 4 p.m., in 414 Mason Hall.
Mr. . Losey will speak on Kleene's
treatment of recursive functions.
Seminar in Mathematical Statistics
will meet on alternate Tuesdays, 3-5
p.m.. in 3201 Angel Hall. The general
subject will be Sequential Analysis,
The first meeting will be Tues., Oct.
6. Prof. C. C. Craig will speak.
Engineering Mechanics Seminar will
meet Wed. Oct. 7, 3:30 p.m., 101 West
Engineering Building. Professor J.
Shea's subject will be "The Dancing
Cable." Refreshments will be served.
Seminar in Complex Variables will
meet Tues., Oct. 6, at 3:30 p.m., in 3011
Angell Hall. Mr. David Storvick will
speak on "The First Main Theorem of
Meromorphic Functions."
The University Extension Service an-
nounces:
Social Psychology. Concerned with
the various ways in which social forces
have influence over the behavior of the
individual. The processes of human in-
teraction are examined with reference
to personality development, psycholog-
ical maladjustment, attitude formation
and change, and problems of group
conflict. Special attention will be given
to the social psychological analysis of
such significant contemporary problems
as racial prejudice, international ten-
sions, public morale, and the psychology
of crisis. The general framework of the
course is a theoretical system which
utilizes the contributions of both psy-
chological and sociological science. If
taken for credit, permission of the in-
structor is required. (Psychology 62 or
Sociology 62, two hours of undergrad-
uate credit.) $18.00. Instructor: Milton
J. Rosenberg. Next meeting of the
class will be held Tuesday evening, Oct.
6, at 7:30 p.m. in Room 176 of the
School of Business Administration.
Activities for Leisure Years II. De-
signed to furnish experience in many
activities older people enjoy in leisure
time. The activities selected will be
adapted to the wishes of the group.
Among those available will be basket
weaving, etching, enameling on cop-
per, rug hooking, photography, wood-
working, bookbinding, and others as
requested. Eight weeks, $6.00. Instruc-
-ors: Dr.,Wilma T. Donahue and Shata
Ling, Assistant in Gerontology. The
next meeting of the class will be Tues-
day evening, Oct. 6, at 7 p.m., in Room
1005 of the University High School.
Investment Fundamentals. A course
of study designed to Introduce laymen
to the more elementarytaspects of se-
curity analysis. The series of leptures
will stress personal budgeting, empha-
size sound over-all investment planning,
and demonstrate useful procedures and
techniques for selecting and analyzing
individual security issues for purchase.
Classroom discussion will assume lit-
tle or no previous knowledge of in-
vestment principles. Six weeks. $6.00.
Instructor: Professor Wilford J. Eite-
man. Next meeting of the class will be
Tuesday evening, Oct. 6, at 7:30 p.m.,
in Room 131 of the School of Business
Administration.
The Opera. Brings to the layman a
fuller understanding of, and a basis
ENDING TONIGHT
Sing an, hSTEREOPHONIC SOUND

ROBERT RHONDA WILLIAM
RYAN- FLEMING- LUNDIGAN
______WEDNESDAY
"SAILOR OF
THE KING"
by the author of "African Queen"

for, a deeper enjoyment of opera as a
musical art form. Deals with the funda-
mental aesthetic principles of opera
and demonstrates their application in
works from Mozart to the present, heard
on the Metropolitan Opera broadcasts.
Sixteen weeks. $18.00. Instructor: Pro-
fessor Glenn D. McGeoch. The next
meeting of the class will be held Tues-
day evening, Oct. 6. at 7 p.m. in 206
Burton Memorial Tower.
Concerts
Roberta Peters, sensational young col-
oratura soprano of the Metropolitan
Opera Association, will open the Dia-
mond Jubilee season of the University
Musical Society in the Choral Union
Series, Wednesday evening, Oct. 7, at
8:30, in Hill Auditorium. She will be
assisted by Warner Bass, accompanist,
and Samuel Pratt, Flutist, in a program
of songs and operatic arias, which will
include: Scarlatti's Qual farfalletta
amante; Caccini's Amarilli; Der Hole
Rache from "The Magic Flute" by Mb-
zart; Sweet Bird from "Il Pensieroso"
by Handel: Sir Henry Bishop's "Lo,
Here the Gentle Lark"; Bravura Vari-
ations by A. Adam; Schubert's Der Hirt
auf dem Felsen; Quietly Night, from
"The Rake's Progress" by Stravinsky;
Grossmachtige Prinzessin from "Ani-
adne" by Ricjaard Strauss; and songs by
Watts, C. Scott, Rachmaninoff, Poulenc,
Moret, and Debussy.
Tickets are on sale at the offices of
the University MusicalaSociety in Bur-
ton Tower during the day; and will also
be on sale at the Hill Auditorium Box
Office on the night of the concert,
after 7 p.m.
Events Today
Science Research Club. The October
meeting will be held in the Rackhamn
Amphitheater, 7:30 p.m. today. Pro-
gram: "Low Temperature Calorimet-
ry," Edgar F. Westrum; "Measure-
ments of the Velocity of Sound in the
Ocean," Richard K. Brown and Julian
R. Frederich. Election of new mem-
bers.
Foresters' Chub Annual Campfire to-
night at Saginaw Forest. Meet 7 p.m.
at the Natural Science Building park-
ing lot, where transportation will be
provided. All School of Natural Re-
sources students are invited.
All Sophomore Women. The mass
meeting for Sophomore Cabaret will be
held tonight at 7:30 in the Union Ball-
room. Floorshow tryouts will be held
at the League Oct. 7, 3 to 5 and 7 to
10; Oct. 8, 3 to 5 and 7 to 10; and Oct.
9, 3 to 5. All sophomores are urged to
attend the mass meeting and sign up
for committees of their choice.
Museum Movie. "Prehistoric Times:
World Before Man" (color). Free onuvie
shown at 3 p.m. daily, including Sat.
and Sun. and at 12:30 Wed., 4th floor .
movie alcove, Museums Building, Oct. 1
6-13.
Anthropology Club. First meeting
tonight at 7:45 p.m., West Confer-1
ence Room, Rackham Building. The
speaker will be Dr. Paul Henle, of the
Department of Philosophy, who will
speak on "Facts and Theories in Sci-
ence." Refreshments will be served.
Tau Beta Pi election meeting tonight
at 7:15 in Room 3-M, Union.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.94
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 overage words to a line.
Classified deadline; 3 P.M. daily.
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND-Pair of horn-rimmed glasses
on S. State street. Call 2-9817 or 9013.
)7A
LOST-Men's brown horn-rimmed glass-
es. Bill Merner, Law Club, 3-4145. )8A

FOR SALE

SOLID WALNUT GATELEG TABLE, $25.
One large double coil springs, $15.00.
One upholstered chair, $1.00. One large
walnut veneerrtable3and five chairs.
$25. One wool rug. $35. Two large wal-
nut veneer buffets, $15 each. One
small steel folding cot, $10.00. Large
child's coaster wagon, $4.00. Phone
2-9020. )13B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store. 122 E. Washington. 114B
YOUNG BUDGIES or Parakeets, also
singing canaries, bird supplies and
cages. 562 S. 7th, Ph. 3-5330. )15B
EVERGREENS: at wholesale
Pfitzer Juniper..........$2.50 to $7.50
Pyramidal Arbor Vitae ..$2.00 to $5.00
Spreading Yew ..........$2.25 to $4.50
Dwarf Mugho Pine ..... $2.50 to $4.00
Also Blue Spruce, hemlock, fir, etc.
Call Michael Lee 8-574 or see me
4100 Chem. Bldg. afternoons. )36B
PURCHASE at "PURCHASE" - Two-
section tripod with pan head. Regular
$13.75, special $9.25. Purchase Camera
Shop, 1116 S. University. )50B
"MOTORIZED BICYCLES"-English 3
gear Hercules with Minimotor. 1
man's and 1 woman's. Used 2 months.
Phone 3-0260. )51B
WEIMARANER PUPPIES - Choice
champ. Stock Imp. P. O. Box No. 638.
Battle Creek, Mich. )55B{
CORONNA PORTABLE -- Call 2-7326.
)56B
FOR SALE. English type bike. One week
old; not deeded because have car. $30.
Phone 2-3834 between 4 & 8 P.M. )59B
KAISER '48; Good condition, low price
Call 8119. Ask Al. a 58B
JUNIOR HOOVER CLEANER with at-
tachments. 2 years old and exactly
like new. Sells about $70 new. Price:
$35. 832 So. Main.

PERSONAL
VOICE LESSONS-Call David Murray.
Graduate voice major. Corrected Ph.
2-7306 between 6-7 p.m. )91
ATT'N. G. FAWKES-Ready with wick.
Where's tunnel? Bbx 1. )9F
WHY NOT ENJOY A WEEKLY NEWS
MAGAZINE (TIME, U.S. NEWS, LIFE)
AT DAILY NEWSPAPER PRICES?
PHONE YOUR ORDER TO STUDENT
PERIODICAL AGENCY, 6007; PAY
LATER. )8F
HELP WANTED
TRAINEE WANTED for night super-
vision. Top pay. 7 to 11:30 p.m. Six
nights. Apply Mrs. Rahn, State Drug
& Fountain, State and Packard. )25H
WAITER WANTED - Board job. Call
Gibbons after 6:30 P.M. 2-2252. )24H
EARN AS YOU STUDY! Ideal year
round full time job for mechanically
inclined student. Time off for up to
7 class hours; and you may study on
the job. Phiine 2-2887. )26H
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITERS) Portable and Standard
for rent, sales and service.
MORRILLS
314 S. State St., Phone 7177
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono and T.V.
Fast and Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.V.
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
11 blocks east of East Eng. )51
WASHING, Finished Work, and Hand
Ironing. Ruff dry and wet 'washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-
up and delivery. Ph. 2-9020. )21
DR. KENNETH N. WESTERMAN: Voice
Development in singing and speak- I
ing. Member research commitee;
Nat'1. Assoc. Teachers of Singing Di-
rector, Walden Woods Voice Confer-
ence, Author of Emergent Voice. Stu- I
dio, 715 Granger; phone 6584. )101
EXPERT TYPIST -- Rates reasonable.
Prompt service. 914 Mary Street.
3-4449. )4I
WANTED TO BUY

Daily
Classifieds
Bring
Quick
Results

ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUEST ROOMS
Reserve rooms now for Football Week-
ends. Rooms by Day or Week. Campus
Tourist Homes. Ph. 3-8454. 518 .E.
Williams St. (near State) )3D
ROOM AND BOARD
STILL A FEW room and board openings
at 1617 Washtenaw. Room $30 per
month. Free linen and porter service.
Board $2.10 per day for three meals.
Phone 3-2360. )6E
BOARD for southeast campus area.
$2.10 per day. Three meals. Generous
refund policy. 1617 Washtenaw. Ph.
3-2360. )7E

WANTED TO RENT
WANTED-Rooms for Medical School
Reunion. Single and double -rooms
are needed for medical alumpi return-
ing to Ann Arbor wishing to rent
rooms for this period are urgently
asked to call the Medical School Of-
fice. Ph. 3-1511, ext. 413. 11K
REAL ESTATE

FOR SALE by owner. Burns Park area,
near bus lines and schools. Colonial
type home; three bedrooms and bath
on second fior. Kitchen, dining room,
panelled sun room on first floor.
Basement room with toilet, shower,
lavatory, laundry room. Gas heat.
Phone 8282 mornings or evenings.
Price $22,000. )20

FOR RENT

Summer Service Projects. If you have AVAILABLE NOW - Ten room unfur-
participated in a summer work camp, nished duplex on campus. Children
seminar, study and travel program or welcome. $125 per month plus heal
other summer project and would like and utilities. Call Mr. Hansen at
(Continued on Page 4' 3-1511, Ext. 2662. )8C
!E
it'S eaSY as pie'.:>
C 4oentry/ b10ns'
No ox tops~

TAPE RECORDER WANTED-Need not
operate. Low cost desired. 3-0521,
Ext. 673. )3J

.. ..,._

-

4

Vfuu £ can cashlinl

U Vv

aln land 0goid

Also CARTOON-NEWS-NOVELTY
COMING
"CITY OF BADMEN"

'K

C'rnf, let's go.

2

TWICE AS MANY AWARDS THIS YEAR
TWICE K, ~r$,

7

SECOND NUMBER - OCT. 30
1953-54 LECTURE COURSE
"A STAGE TRIUMPH"
-LIFE MAGAZINE

j

WRITE A LUCKY STRIKE JINGLE
based on the fact that LUCKIES TASTE BETTER!*

P, e
p C°Mp N i
~S,'YP*O0
Adapted and Music and
Direted by . ffets by
CHARLES/ WAITER -
LAUGHTON S(HUMANN
Other Celebrities on the Course
HON. CHESTER BOWLES, Oct. 15
* HON. TRYGVE LIE, Nov. 11
* HANSON BALDWIN, Feb. 9
MRS. ALAN KIRK, Feb. 18
* HON. HERBERT BROWN ELL, Jr., Mar. 2

:rom welk own o*.g parS~llY/
(Most any place yO ~
WS Duck(y Strike -for' better taste
W-ith people. in the klnow t

Memberships Now On Sale
for our 1953-54 season
at Marshall's Book Store, Wahr's Book Store,
the Music Center, and
THE ARTS THEATER CLUB
2091/2 E. Washington ... Phone 7301
"A Prof essional Company - A Members' Theater"
perfect rain date .
color bright
Authentic waterprooft sicker of soft suppler
genuine oilskin. Easy drape and smart
tailoring for that chic come-hither look..

Easiest $25 you ever made. Sit right
down and write a 4-line jingle based on
the fact that Luckies taste better.
That's all there is to it. More awards
than ever before?
Read the jingles on this page. Write
original ones just like them-or better!
Write as many as you want. There's
no limit to the number of awards you
can receive. If we pick one of your
jingles, we'll pay you $25 for the right
to use it, together with your name, in
Lucky Strike advertising.
Remember: Read all the rules and
tips carefully. To be on the safe side,
clip them out and keep them handy.
Act now. Get started today.

Mmeats -folks say, are {aoft
1h~r seasoned pert'ectly"
For' better taste, 'sLckeh9,
That win the cheers-" not met

,,m m

-------CLIP OUT THIS INFORMATION'---

RULES

1. Write your Lucky Strike jingle on a plain piece
of paper or post card and send it to Happy-Go-Lucky,
P. 0. Box 67. New York 46, N.Y. Be sure that your
name, address, college and class are included-and

*TIPS
To earn an award you are not limited to
"Luckies taste better." Use any other sales
points on Lucky Strike, such as the fol-
IowinR:

:; ''wiiiiti(iL'iiw4i61:iLi ti.ii'wY1i
:'
i'i l

.

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