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October 04, 1953 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-10-04

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f

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE-MAGAZINE PAGE

SWEDISH TEXTILES TOC
'U'_Museu
By STU ROSS
With a note of matter-of-fact
universality the University. Mu-
seum announces three exhibits as
far-flung artistically and geo-
graphically as have ever before
been gathered under one skylight.
Here is the naive conceptualism
of snow-bound arctic tribes; the,
sheer sophistication of Swedish in-
terior decoration, and, somewhere
in between, the pick of popular
art in France.
* * *
FOR CONSISTENCY of effect
the sophisticated Swedes take top
'Zubel' Shov
At Locafal Ga
Opening the fall season at the
Forsythe Gallery is' a collection of
new oils and watercolors by Zu-
bel Kachadoorian which will be
premiered from 5 to 8 p.m. today
in the gallery at 1101 Martin Pl.
IXnown more popularly as "Zu-
bel," the name with which he signs
his work, the 29 year old artist has
just returned from three years
abroad, most of which time was
spent in the Mediterranean area.
* *
WHILE in Paris, the young
.painter was on the radio with
F rank UnrLl d Wri ht held s. nne

ESKIMO ART:
m Exhibits Discussed$
honors. They display what must visual; the impulse to touch is <
be a national sense of color that far too strong to disobey. Textures!
is exceedingly subtle and exciting run from soft woolen shawls and
The visitor enters the gallery gauze-like curtains to heavy up-
to find himself in a circus of holsteries and hooked rugs made f.., ;<
muted high key. color, a cur- to be run through barefoot.'
ious mixture of intensity and * * * ">
quietude, SAFELY ensconced in thick .
Almost all the hangings display glass are some 50 animals and
a singular knack for the use of people carved out of ivory and
color schemes involving slight stone by Eskimos. They are most- f}
variations on a single color, these ly all the same size, about seven
subtle variations usually being off- or eight inches in height, and:
set by a neutral shade in the most portray women carrying
ooverall linear pattern. children, or me nhunting, or arc-
The appeal is as tactile as it is tic animals.
The effect of such profusion
and similarity is somewhat mo-
To o n sOpe n". ""Taken"individually,
the pieces display the much-
touted innate primitive feeling
for simplification and beauty of
Ydform which becomes "modern1
expression."
But there is something amiss.
There is not. the feeling here of!
: the prime purpose of primitive RACKHAM SHOW-Edith Clar
art; that of use within the cul- for the Ann Arbor Artists show
ture itself, whether, it be for re- showing from 8 to 10 p.m. tomo
ligious or functional or orna-
mental reasons.
< rAnd even granting that the s "
.} f } "primitive" tribes of Alaska have A rix
taken to considering their handi-
work as an aesthetic end in itself,_
these works have so much of the.
,.feeling of mass production, fall The 31st annual Ann Arbor Ar-
so consistently into a standard tist's Association exhibit will open
pattern or formula of representa- with a special reception from 8
tion, that they seem almost stamp- to 10 p.m. tomorrow at the Rack-
ed for tourist consumption. ham Galleries.

'TOO LATE THE PHALAROPE':
Paton's Novel Reviewed

C
S
a
1

By DIANE DECKER The author passes no value very worthvhile, well done novel.
Daily Associate Editor judgments on the justice of the Unfortunately, like all second
The Phalarope is a South Afri- law or the desirability of that so- novels, it must stand comparison
can bird. cial structure; the reader must with the author's first and highly
It is in the discovery and ob- pass his ocwn. successful novel, "Cry, the Beloved
servation of the bird. that Pieter, * * * Country."
police lieutenant, rugby star. and "TOO LATE the Phalarope" Many of the same elements
idol of his community, finds re- might nevertheless fall into the arc in the second work-it has
conciliation with his father. run-of-the-mill novel category if the poignancy, thtrai ele
But "Too Late the Phalarope" it were not for employment of a ments and the penetrating pe-
is not a happy story. Reconcilia- skillful narration device. sonal analysis. Cry, the e
tion and reaffirmation do notln
come in time to save Pieter from Pieter's story is told through loved Country, however, did
his inevitable tragic destiny, the eyes of his Aunt Sophie, more with the raw framework
* * * whose eyes are loving and com- within which Paton writes.
PIETER van Vlaanderen was passionate, from a retrospec- It vividly depicted the beautie
two men, the boy who could out- I tive standpoint. Through her 1of the South African country in a
iide and outshoot all his friends, sympathetic rendition, Pieter poetic style which is seldom
yet he was "gentle, tender to wom.- emerges as a noble and strong achieved in the second novel. "Too
." peson.Late the Phalarope" is occasion-
en and children." person. ally poetic, but sometimes merely
Perhaps it was the second Moreover, "Tante Sophie" her- an example of overly sentimental.
characteristic within him which self emerges as a character of wit, ized writing.
caused him to break the strict- sensitivity and strength. The min- Both books show that rarely
est law governing the relation- or characters of the novel are found quality, the ability to de-
ship between blacks and whites cleverly drawn, from Japie, the pict a social structure with objec-
in the Transvaal. This violation addle-brained social worker, to, tivity and without losing sight of
causes the complete collapse of Pieter's father, a stern-faced, Bi- the individual man. This was a
the venerable house of van ble reading patriarch, strong point of "Cry, the Beloved
Vlaanderen. Standing on its own merit, Country," and it is done equally
If there is a valid criticism of "Too Late the Phalarope" is a well in "To Late the Phalarope."
this book, it is that author Paton
has written too closely within Ari-
stotle's terms of tragedy for a
modern reading audience. Modern
readers frequently fail to appre-
ciate the quality of inevitability,
preferring to be surprised rather
Lia" +r% c: Qf~ln J oyrarlUU l Uif±UiU

-Daily-Lon Qui
k, '56M, helps arrange paintings
which will open with-a special
rrow.
IToBegin-u
some professional, many hob-.
bvists.

.r ranL . y gyJ U V'V , t.LAAV a C
man show and received consider-
able acclaim.
Since his return he has had a
one man show of drawings at the -
Detroit Artist's Market, but the
oils and watercolors-and a few
drawings-which are to be ex-
hibited in the show have never
been shown in the United States.
Zubel is known for his skilled
draftsmenship-all of his work is
based on subject matter, either :'>": >r{
people or nature, though it is in-
terpreted in a unique style dis-
tinctly his own.
In this country he studied with "
the late Prof. Carlos Lopez of the:
architecture and design college
among others.
His desire is to be sincere rath-
er than clever in order to express EXHIBIT-One of the paint-
everyday life conviction. ings by Zubel which will be in
the show opening today at the
After today's opening, ,exhibit Forsythe Gallery.
hours will be from 10 a.m. to 5*
p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays On leave from the University
through this month. during the last year, Prof. Wilt
Upcoming later this fall at the has been doing extensive work in
gallery is a large show of the re- the watercolor medium and has
cent work of Prof. Richard Wilt of recently won prizes in major ex
the architecture and design college. hibits.

THE POSTERS from France
are those done by artists to adver-
tise exhibits of their own works.
They include works by Picas-
so, Matisse, Braque, Chagall,
Leger, and others. The most
successful ones are those con-
ceived initially and in their en-
tirety as posters, such as those
by Matisse and Leger.
The rest are created by the ad-
dition of type to a well-knownI
work by the artist, and are in a
sense of as high a quality as the
work itself.
All show a conscious sensitivity
to formal design elements that is
something of a relief after the
Esquimeaux.

U.Yin A ;than to watch a graduai unioid-
Represented among others from ing of a preordained event.
the architecture and design facul- From the beginning of the
ty are Prof. Richard Wilt and story, the reader knows that Pieter
Prof. Chet La More, both fre- will transgress. He is asked to
quent exhibitors in the Ann Ar- watch the progression of a story
bor displays and shows through- which lacks suspense and drama-
out the country. tic conflict

Newes t

Featuring the wide variety of
arts and crafts work that has
marked the Association's.-shows in
the last few years, the exhibit will
run through Friday, Oct. 23. Gal-'
lery hours are from 10 a.m. to 10
p.m. daily except Sundays.
SET UP BY William A. Lewis,
technical illustrator for the Re-k
search Center at Willow Run and
Frank Cassara of the architecture
and design college, the display
fills three gallery rooms.
Paintings, drawings, sculp-
ture, graphic arts and crafts
are represented in the show.
All of the work was done by
Washtenaw County residents,

No jury is ever used in se-
lecting work for the Associa-
tion's exhibits. Instead, each
arfist is allowed to display two-
pieces of his work.
Tomorrow's preview of the ex-
hibit is open to the public. Re-
freshments will be served.

In return, he is treated to an
intimate picture of a man's
mind and a modern day cathar-
sis. Release from pity and fear
comes with the understanding
that the law has been upheld
and the social structure in tur-
bulent South Africa has been
upheld.

FICTION AND NON-FICTION
Overbeck Bookstore
1216 South University
Phone 3-4436

I

195354 LECTURE

COURSiE

,y
!t
s

'A GIRL CAN TELL' :
Former 'U' Student
Opens in New Play

Memberships Now On Sale
for our 1953-54 season
at Marshall's Book Store, Wahr's. Book Store,
the Music Center, and
THE ARTS THEATER CLUB
20912% E. Washington ... Phone 7301
'A Professional Company - A Members' Theater"
generation
IS NOW ACCEPTING
STORIES
POETRY
ART
MUSIC
DEADLINE OCTOBER 30
First Floor, Student Publications Bldg.
4 - . - .. .- --

IU

I

PRESENTS
The Nation's Finest Platform Series
Available To Students (and wives) for only $3.00

ENTERTAINING

INFORMATIVE

0

Honorable
CHESTER A. BOWLES
Former U. S. Ambassador to India
"Our Best Hope For Peace in Asia"
6., OCTOBER 15

-Starring in a brilliant
dramatization of
Stephen Vincent Benet's
"John Brown's Body"
with supporting cast
and choral group

I

When "A Girl Can Tell" opens
in Detroit tomorrow' as part of a
three week pre-Broadway tour
west of the Alleghenies, a former
University student will play one
of the dozen contenders for the
hand of Janet Blair.
Donald Symington, New York
actor-playwright, who attended
the Summer Session to do re-
search, for a play on a foreign
student at a midwestern univer-
sity, plays a moth ball magnate
in the new F. Hugh Herbert com-
edy opening tomorrow for a two
week run at the Cass Theater.
"A GIRL CAN TELL" has been
called one of the three incoming
plays with the greatest hit poten-
tial.
Herbert, who is' also directing
the play, is the author of "The
Moon is Blue" Broadway hit of
a few seasons ago; "Kiss and
Tell" and "For Love or Money."
Miss Blair who plays the lead
role as a bewitching and much
kissed Jennifer, has just complet-
ed a three year tour as Ensign
Detroit Museum
O ffers Programs
For Fall Season
Students in Detroit over the
weekend can take advantage of a
special series of Sunday afternoon
programs at the Institute of Arts
on Woodward Ave.
The Sunday programs begin at
4 p.m. in the Lecture Hall. To-
day's talk will be "Songs That
Built America."
Next week a Sunday lecture on
"Santos: The Religious Folk Art
of New Mexico" will be given in
ernnein itv,.Ah n. srncnialt rIhvw o~f

Nellie Forbush in the hTational
Company of "South Pacific."
Others in the cast include Paul
McGrath, Tod Andrews, Marshall
Thompson, Dean Harens, Joan
Wetmore and Alexander Clark.
As the comedy opens, Miss
Blair is a 35-year-old mother of
an attractive, boy -crazy teen
age daughter. Then in a flash-
back, the playwright shows Miss
Blair at 18, showered by the .
attentions of a dozen eligible
young bachelors, trying to. de-
cide which one rates her "I do."
Remembrance of her own ado-
lescent trials help her to cope
with the seeming insanities of her
daughter's behavior.
A Broadway opening at the
Royale Theater will immediately
follow the play's Detroit engage-
ment.

I

I
.

I

i

*

MRS. ALAN' KIRK
Wife of the former United States
Ambassador to Russia
"Life in Moscow Today"
FEBRUARY 18

ANNE BAXTER
TYRC
SEASON
TICKETS
NOW ON SALE
Main Floor---------$7.50'
Balcony -----------$6.50
Student Rate
Second Balcony
(Unreserved)--------$3.00
* SEASON TICKETS
GUARANTEE GOOD SEATS
" SEASON TICKETS PROVIDE
SUBSTANTIAL SAVINGS
Box Office Open Daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
PHONE 3-1511 . EXTENSION 479
HILL AUDITORIUM

)NE POWER
I RAYMOND MASSEY
OCTOBER 30

Hon. HERBERT
BROWNELL, Jr.
Attorney General of the
United States
"Our Internal Security"
MARCH 2

/ I I / r

TRYGVE LIE

Honorable

First Secretary General ofthe United Nations
"How To Meet the Challenge of Our Times"
M-.NOVEMBER I I

:.. :.

-JNRW.'

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