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October 03, 1953 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


PAGE FOtTE

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'AH-AH-AH CHOOO!'
Students Plagued by Cold Epidemic'

By FRAN SHELDON
More students have colds than
get rides hitch-hiking.
In a random survey of 123 stu-
dents on the Diag yesterday, The
Daily found that 62 per cent of
those interviewed claimed to be
suffering from a cold-or to be
just getting over one.
** *
LECTURE HALLS and Health
Service were found to be filled
with sneezers and coughers.
According to Dr. Warren E.
Forsythe, director of Health Ser-
vice, the number of students
coming in for treatment because
of colds is higher than normal,
but not unusual for this time of
year. He pointed out that "with
the opening of school there is
usually a flare-up of colds."
The impressive number of com-
mon colds has been attributed to
everything from "some bug" and
"too much homework" to "it's the
dishes."
HELEN BEERS, '55, called the
colds "psychosomatic," and sug-
gested that "everyone dig down
into his subconscious to find the
reason."
"Everything is blamed on
colds," according to Paul Geiger,
'55, 'Ensian general sales man-
ager. "I think we can attribute
the lack of senior picture sign-
ups before nine this morning to
the large number of colds. What
else could keep seniors away?"
Hitch-hi1ers, too, claim to be
suffering. "How can we expect to
get rides when we're loaded down
with handkerchiefs, anti-hista-
Union Opera
Road Show
Heads Named
Road show chairmen for six
towns in which the 1953 Union
opera will appear were announ-
ed last night by Richard Huff,
'55BAd., general chairman of the
road show committee.
Chairman for the Lansing show-
Ing is Clarence N. Tinker, '54, while
Jerry Yardley, '56, wil be in charge
of the booking in Chicago.
Jerry Prescott has been named
chairman for Flint. Advance work
for the Toledo appearance will be
done by Jack Gallon, '55L. For the
i0roit showing, James DeLand,
'56,., has been placed in charge,
while Howard Boasberg, '57, has
been named Buffalo road show
chairman.
Chairman of the Cleveland com-
mittee has yet to be named, Huff
commented. Anyone interested
from the Cleveland area on cam-
pus should leave his name, address
and qualifications at the Union
main desk, he added.
The new chairmen will work
with alumni in the town which
they represent. They will work out
publicity requests of alumni in
their respective towns and help in
the advance sale of tickets.
Smith Named
To State Post
Local attorney Talbot Smith,
who received his master and law
degrees from the University, was
appointed yesterday to the six-
rMan State Corrections Commission
by Gov. G. Mennen Williams.
The last-minute appointee, a
Democrat, was named to serve a
six-year term, expiring Oct. 1, 1959,
on the bipartison commission.
Smith still must be confirmed by
the Senate but will serve in the
interim until the Legislature meets

next year.
Smith was named after former
state controller Robert F. Stead-
fast was ruled ineligible to serve
on the commission. He was re-
jected by Attorney General Frank
G. Millard, who- ruled Steadfast
was employed by the city of De-
troit.
Yesterday Smith said that his
local legal practice had involved
non-criminal work, but added that
he had "become aware of certain
problems in Michigan prison ad-
ministration" when he served on
a commission to investigate last
year's Southern Michigan Prison
riots.
Lead Roles Picked
For G & S Operetta
Leading roles for "Patience," fa-
mous Gilbert and Sullivan operet-
ta satirizing thie idyllis poet Oscar
Wilde, were announced yesterday
by society president, Harry Easom,
'54.
Taking leading roles for the
Nov. 5 and 6 performances will be

NR Alumni
To See Game'
For Finale
Rounding out the final day of
the University Foresters' Associa-
tion reunion and the School of
Natural Resources' 50th anniver-
sary, visiting alumni will attend
today's football game.
Buses will leave the Natural
Science Bldg. at 10 a.m. today to I
take alumni to the Wood Tech-
nological Laboratory, Saginaw For-
est and Stinchfield Woods.
YESTERDAY'S activities in-
cluded a pancake breakfast at a'
local church, a Convocation pre-
sided over by University President
Harlan H. Hatcher and field trips
to the school's laboratories and
grounds.
Last night, University Vice-
President Marvin Niehuss and
Prof. Samuel Dana, dean emeri-
tus of the natural resources
school addressed a banquet hon-
oring the forestry alumni.
William Rosecrans, chairman of
the California State Board of For-
estry, speaking on "Forestry Look-
ing Backwards and Forward," said
that specialization is going to be-
come more common and more
necessary in the education of fu-
ture foresters.
- * *
WHILE specialization will be im-
portant, he added, it "should be
in balance with a general study
requirement to avoid forestry
splintering off into a group of al-
lied professions."
"There is," he said, "a need for
semivocational training, giving,
for instance, a two year course
leading to a technician's certifi-
cate in forestry."
Rosecrans called the past 50
years' developments in forestry ed-
ucation a remarkable event in
American history and the history
of education.

New Barrier Surrounds'
'U' High Athletic Field

Tired of being caught with!
their fences down, University
High School officials are adding
a new six foot barrier around thej
school's athletic field.
The field, surrounded by its old,
low fence had been used against
rules for the last four years by
East Quad men and others in the
vicinity.
AN AGREEMENT made be-
tween the East Quad and high
school principal J. M. Trytten pro-
vided that the field could be used
by East Quad men, but only after
5:15 p.m. on weekdays and all day
on weekends.
The agreement had further
provided that men using the
field wear gym shoes and get
permission from the quad office
before using the field.
With the low fence, however,
men from all quads had been
finding it no barrier, climbing
over and recently going through
where the fence had been broken.
Med Alumni
To Meet Here
More than 5,000 medical alumni
have been invited to take part in
the Medical School's fifth trien-
nial Medical Conference Oct. 15
to 17.
S xty University medical staff
doctors will present papers on lat-
est developments in medical re-
search. Papers and clinical pres-
eptations will cover cancer, tu-
berculosis, arthritis, poliomyelitis
and psychosomatic illnesses.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

"Many times, both college and
high school men would be on the
field together before 5 p.m." Mrs.
Gloria Parsons, Trytten's secretary
reported. "Also they wore any-
thing but gym shoes on their feet
and as you can see, the field is
well worn now."
John Bingley, East Quad resi-
dent director, said that he believ-
ed that the quadmen would still
be allowed to use the field and
hoped that the new fence would
have its effect.

Tickets
Tickets turned in for resale
to the Union Student Offices
may be purchased between 9
a.m. and 1 p.m. today in the
Union lobby, staffman Bernard
Levine, '56, said yesterday.
During the morning, tickets
may still be brought in for re-
sale, he added.
Last week, about 65 tickets
were sold for the Michi-
gan-University of Washington
game, Levine said. The resale
service will continue for all
home football games.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1953
SL German
Student Met
Bernhd Rissmann, first German
student to study at the University
under Student Legislature's cul-
tural exchange program with the
Free University of Berlin, was
greeted on campus yesterday.
After registering in the School
of Business Administration, Riss-
man was conducted on a tour of
the SL Bldg. and checked in at the
Pi Lambda Phi fraternity house,
where he will stay during fall se-
mester.

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--Daily-Don Campbell

COLD DEJECTION

mines and red noses?" one de-
manded. "We scare drivers away."
BOB SOWATSKY, '55E, claims
to have a remedy, however. "Keep
away from fraternities-even your
own. Stay in your own room and.
don't let anyone else in-they
might be dangerous."
One football player referred
sufferers to "some pills the coach
has," and several more advocat-
ed "complete rest--especially
with reference to class attend-
ance."

Anne Purdy, '55, presented her
problem with the comment, "I
have seven roommates and when
one of us catches cold, we all do
-like now. Sickness around here is
tremendous."
When asked about the state of
their health, most people reacted
with an exploratory sniff, a clear-
ing of the throat and a half-
cough. Those who could talk did.
Some nodded vigorously and point-
ed to their throats. They had
laryngitis.

Application Forms Available
For Fulbright Scholarships
Fulbright Scholarships, educa- ners is made by the Board of For-
tional exchange grants for over- eign Scholarships.
seas graduate study may be ap- eg coasis
plied for until Oct. 31, officials of Also included in foreign schol-'
the Graduate School announced arship programs sponsored by the
yesterday. government is the Buenos Aires
Application blanks for students Convention. Applications are be-
who have a college degree and who ing processed for the Convention
are citizens may be obtained in through colleges and universities
Rm. 1020 Rackham Bldg. for the first time this year. Eli-
* , gibility rules for the Cqnvention
STUDENTS applying should are the same as for the Fulbright
have some knowtedr of the n- grants.

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-..dmvrmb
md & A
am

11VUz~lle g~vvU tUeI~
guage of the country they wish to
study in, Mrs. Edith Fox, Gradu-
ate School clerk emphasized.

Capt. Langworthy

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FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
William and State Sts.
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
10:45 A.M.: World-Wide Communion observance:
Dr. Parr will preach on
"The 'Gathered' Church."
10:45 A.M.: Church School and Nursery.
7:00 P.M.: Student Guild in the Mayflower Room
Prof. Bennett Weaver will speak on "Personal
Devotions."
FIRST .METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Student Seminar: An Insight Into
the Jewish Faith.
10:45 A.M.: Worship and Holy Communion,
"This Starved World" Dr. Abbey preaching.
5:30 P.M: Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and Program, Dr. Abbey
will speak on, "Pathways To God's Presence."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily!
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone 2-1121
Wm. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M.: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: "The Importance of a Choice."
7:30 P.M.: "Outward Appearance or Inward
Reality?"
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Prayer Meeting.
A Friendly Church where the Word is preached.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. 25-025. Office Ph. 7421
10:00 A.M. Mornina Service.
7:30 P.M.: Evening~Service.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Lane Hall
11:00 A.M.: Sundays. Visitors welcome.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
William H. Bos, Minister to Students
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service. "World-wide Com-
munion."
7:00 P.M.: Student Guild at Bethlehem Church.
Discussion: "Church and State'' European and
American views Guest leader: Mr. Wolfgang
Fikentscher, of Germany.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
AND STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Charles Mitchell, Assistant Minister W
William S. Baker, University Pastor
Donna B. Lokker, Program Assistant
9:15 A.M.: Breakfast Discussion.
p
9:15 and 11:00: Morning Worship with the
observance of World Wide Communion.
6:45 P.M.: Guild meeting. Mr. Fred Kassner,
psychologist at the Lapeer State Home, will
speak on "The Problem of the Mentally De-
ficient."
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 North Division St. .
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Dr. Robert H. Whitaker, Chaplain for
Student Foundation
Mrs. Elizabeth M. Davis, Social Director

According to Mrs. Fox, 26 kYI VU 0I .1II.II 1 0J LII.FII
University students received Ful-
bright grants last year. Spon- Capt. W. J. Langworthy, assist-
sored by the Department of ant professor of military science
State, the scholarships are and tactics with the Army ROTC
awarded for study in 24 coun-
tries. received promotion to ,®major in
Final selection of Fulbright win- ceremonies held yesterday.

e
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FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Suinday Morning Services.
Oct. 4-Unreality.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 t 5, Friday evenings from
7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30 to
4:30.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-8:45 AM.: Matin Service-Communion.
9:45 A.M.: Bible Study.
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service--Communion.
6:00 P.M.: Supper for New Students.
Wednesday-7:15 P.M.: Weekly Class "The
Church and Current Problems" -
Prof. G. E. Lenski.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Cthrist)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon: "Some-
thing Old, Something New."
Nursery for children during service.
9:45 A.M.: Church School.
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Meeting at the Congregational Church, 7:00P.M.
Professor Bennett Weaver will discuss: "Per-
sonal Devotions in The Life of The Student."
THE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw, Phone 20085
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian Church School.
Unitarian Adult Group.
11:00 A.M.: Service of Worship: ASermon by
Edward H. Redman on the topic: "War, Peace,
and You."
11:00 A.M.: Unitarian Junior High Group.
7:30 P.M.: Unitarian Student Group Panel: "The
Relationship of Unitarians to Political Activity"
CONGREGATIONAL DISCIPLES
STUDENT GUILD
Guild Hous, 438 Maynard Street
Sunday evening meetings at the CongregatiQnal
Church. Program 7:00 P.M.
Tea at the Guild House every Tuesday, 4:30 to
6:00
Mid-Week Meditation in Douglas Chaoel, Thurs-
days at 5:00
H. L. Pickerill, Director
Sue Gillespie, Assistant
Student Program Sponsored by
MEMORIAL CHRISTAN CHURCH'
(Disciples o.f Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and E. William St.
Rev. Leonard Parr, Minister
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone 7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Pastor and Student Coun-
selor
9:45 A.M.: Student Class studies "What Stu-
dents Can Believe About Man."
11:00 A.M.: Church Worship. Sermon Topic: "A
Sure Harvest."
6:45 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild. Speaker,
Prof .David Nanney of the Zoology Depart-
ment. Topic: "Don't B Afraid to Change
Your Mind."

{1

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I1

8:00 A.M.:
9:00 A.M.:
(followed
House) .
10:15-10:45:
11:00-12:30:

Holy Communion.
Holy Communion and Commentary
by Student Breakfast, Canterbury
Junior High and High School Classes.
Church School.

11:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Sermon.
12:30 P.M.: After-Service Fellowship.
6:00-7:30: Youth Group.
6:00 P.M.: Student Buffet Supper, Canterbury
House.
7:00 P.M.: Canterbury Club.
8:00 P.M.: Evensong and Commentary (followed
by Coffee Hour at Canterbury House).
During the Week: Holy Communion, Wednesday
and Thursday 7:00 A.M. followed by Student
Breakfast at Canterbury House and Friday at
12:10 P.M.; Student Tea, ,Tuesday and Friday

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenow Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips. Pastor
Saturday at 4:30: Open House after the Game.
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Two worship op-
portunities, with Holy Communion in each
service. The pastor will preach on "Our Four-
fold Witness to Christ."
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club. Suooer and Program. Talk at 6:45 by

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