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October 01, 1952 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1952-10-01

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(

TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1952

I I U ~

MONKEYS NEXT?
Economics Department
SmellsRat; finds One
By JON SOBELOFF
The source of the little scurry-
ing noises sometimes heard in the
Economics Bldg. during marginal
utility discussions has been dis-

covered.
There are rats in the

SL Agenda
Thefollowing items will be
considered when the Student
Legislature meets at 7:30 p.m.
today in the Strauss dining
room of East Quadrangle:
National Student Association
appropriations
Regional NSA constitutional
revisions
Book Store report
Announcement of appoint-
ments to SL vacancies
All interested studentis and
faculty members are invited by
the SL to attend the meeting.
Olson To Speak
Dean Willard C. Olson of the
School of Education will speak on
the "Philosophy of Growth" to-
morrow at a district meeting of
the Michigan Education Associa-
tion in Petoskey, Michigan.
On October 6 and 7, he will at-
tend a conference of the National
Institute of Mental Health at
Bethesda, Maryland.

Quads Stem from Historic Background

Economicsj

By RUSS AUWERTER
The Michigan House Plan,
which determined the development
of the University dormitory sys-
tem, springs from a heritage going
much further back in history than
its humble beginning of a century
ago.
Starting in 1837 with sketches
for a projected campus including
plans for two dormitories and four
professors' houses, the House Plan
has led a life of sporadic popular-
ity.
THE FOUNDERS of the Uni-
versity followed the German phi-
losophy of residence halls, which
rules out the desirability of any
concern with the student outside
the lecture hall and, therefore,
eliminates dormitories.
Opposing the German idea
was the British system, which
makes the residence hall the
center of the student's formal as
well as informal education.
The British system, originated

at Oxford and Cambridge, served
as a model for the Michigan
House Plan which was first real-
ized in 1841 when the North Wing
of old Mason Hall was adapted to
dormitory living.
WHEN President Tappan came
to Ann Arbor, he declared that he
was opposed to "the extravagant
system which provided that stu-
dents should live in potential
clssroom areas." He succeeded in
removing all the residence facili-
ties from Mason Hall.
The housing situation for men
students after the first World
War was critical, but the Uni-
versity was unable to appropri-
ate funds until 1932 when Flet-
cher Hall was purchased. Five
years later Allen-Rumsey House
was constructed marking the
real beginning of the men's
housing program.
West Quad was completed in
1939 and Victor C. Vaughan House

and the East Quad were finished
soon after. South Quad is now
starting its second year of serv-
ice.
Women's residences were in
acute need after the University
decided that it was undesirable to
have living without restriction in
Ann Arbor. Betsy Barbour, Helen
Newberry, and Martha Cook were
acquired before the year 1922. By
1941 the women's dorms were com-
plete except for Alice Lloyd which
was finished after the last war.
New Art Course
Creative Artists at Work, a new
Extension Service course explain-
ing the artistic purpose and meth-
ods, will hold its first meeting at
7:45 p.m. tomorrow in Auditorium
B in the new Angell Hall addition.
The ten week course will feature
talks by nine faculty members,
each proficient in one of the cre-
ative fields of art.

THIS DISTURBING fact, long
suspected by students of econo-
mics, was disclosed yesterday in a
confidential interview in the dim-
ly lit basement offices of the eco-
nomics department.
James B. Jones, teaching fel-
low, pointed to a large metal air
conduit in the corner of the
room. "Last summer, while it
very hot, one of the rats died in
there. We moved our desks over
by the window for a month or
so," Jones related sadly.
Queried on the source of the
rodents, Jones suggested that they
were probably the offspring of
common grey field rats and white
rats which had escaped from their
cages in the Pharmacology Bldg.
basement next door.
AS EVIDENCE for this hypo-
thesis, Jones cited the case of the
surprised department member who
pulled open his desk drawer and
found therein a white rat in ex-
tremely poor physical condition.
When asked how working in
close proximity to rats felt,
Jones exclaimed enthusiastically,
"Oh, we enjoy it. But it is sort
of eerie while working alone at
night with just one light on to
hear the pattet of little prehen-
si e feet," he added.
"Now don't get me wrong,"
Jones continued in an unsolicited
burst of loyalty. "We're proud of
bur building. We like it-rats in-
cluded."
* * *
AT THIS POINT, the interview
was interrupted by a scratchy
sound apparently emanating from
within the walls. "There goes one
now," Jones said happily. "Any
day now we're expecting one of
the experimental monkeys from
the Pharmacology Bldg. next door
to come swinging in here."
A more practical view of the
matter was taken by Economics
Bldg. Custodian Floyd Auten.
SRA Names
New Seminars
Three new seminars have been
announced by the Student Reli-
gious Association.
Prof. Leroy Waterman, one of
the translators of the Revised
Standard Bible and emeritus pro-
fessor of semantics, will lead a,
seminar on the Prophetic Religion
of the ,Old Testament at 7:30 p.m.
every Wednesday beginning today.
A Seminar on Contemporary
study of World Faiths will be held
at 7:30 p.m. Monday, beginning
Oct. 6. Faculty leaders will be
Prof. Frank Huntley of the Eng-
lish department and George Men-
denhall of the Near East depart-
ment. Dewitt C. Baldwin, Lane
Hall Director will coordinate the
seminar.
A Freshman discussion group
will begin at 7:15 p.m., Tuesday,
Oct. 7. Gerhard Lenski of the so-
ciology department and Rev. Grey
Auston of the Lane Hall staff will
lead the group.
The three groups are under the
direction of the study and dis-
cussion department of SRA, head-
ed by Carol Rush, '54.

cLA SSFIESD

-Daily-Ken Tootell"
WEE VISITOR
"It wasn't rats from next door,"
he assured us. "Just ordinary
grey ones. They come through
between the walls."
Next'door at the animal cages
in the basement of the Pharma-
cology Bldg. Sam Irwin, a research
assistant said, "Definitely not
ours," when asked about the Eco-
nomic Bldg. rats.
"But," he added, "I appreciate
the problem of the economics de-
partment. The rat is a wily cre-
ature. They won't solve their rat
problem easily," Irwin predicted.
MISNOMER:
Name Conflict
BothersClub
The Citizen's for Stevenson, stu-
dent chapter, alais Students for
Stevenson, is finding out just how
much is in a name.
The grout/ was registered with
the Office of Student Affairs as
Citizens for Stevenson because the
local group, with which they are
not affiliated, was called "Citi-
zens." However, the city group was
erroneous in taking that name,
since the national organization is
called "Volunteers for Stevenson"
to avoid confusion with rival poli-
ticos, "Citizens for Eisenhower."
Therefore, the city group has
changed its title.
Although they dislike existing
under a misnomer, the student
group has decided that they will
remain, officially, "Citizens," but
call themselves "Students." They
are affiliated with the national
organization of "Students for Ste-
venson" which is found on college
campuses across the country.
At any rate, under any name,
the club is sure of whom they're
backing all the way.
* * *
100 Register
In Local Drive
More than 100 voters have been
registered to date in the Volun-
teers for Stevenson registration
drive.
The volunteers, more than 100
strong, have covered the city of
Ann Arbor and are now registering
votes in Willow Village, Ypsilanti
township and outlying areas.
Sent out as teams, the workers
take with each group a Junior
Chamber of Commerce member to
register as they go along. The
J.C.C. has been deputized to act
as registrars.
The "get out the vote" drive will
last through the week, until the
Oct. 6 deadline for registration.
The County Democratic Organi-
zation' has outlined the areas to
be covered by the volunteers, but
the drive is strictly non-partisan.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on saturday).
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1952
VOL. LXIII, No. 8
Notices
Student sponsored Activities. All ac-
tivities and projects sponsored or pro-
duced by student organizations must re-
ceive the approval of the Committeeon
Student Affairs. Petitions for considera-
tion by the Committee should be sub-
mitted to the Office of Student Affairs
at least two weeks before the event is
to take place. Request forms may be se-
cured in the Office of Student Affairs,
1020 Administration.
Calendaring. Activities must be ca-
endared to take place before the tenth
day prior to the beginning of a final
examination period. Advance reserva-
tion of specific dates for major pro-
jects may be made with the calendaring
committee of the Student Legislature in
accordance with announcements made
by it.
Speakers. Before the Committee on
titudent Affairs will consider a request
for approval of a meeting at which a
student organization proposes to pre-
sent a speaker, approval of the speak-
er by the Committee on University-Lee-
tures is required. Request for such ap-
proval must be submitted to the Le-
ture Committee at least two weeks
prior to the date of the planned meet-
ing.
Committee on Student Affairs. Regu-
lar meetings of the Committee on Stu-
dent Affairs for the school year will
be held on Oct. 14, 28; Nov. 11, 25; Dec.
9; Jan. 13, 27; Feb. 10, 24; March 10, 24;
April 21, May 12, 26.
Rhodes Scholarships. There will be a
meeting of all those students interest-
ed in Rhodes Scholarships, 2013 Angell
Hall, Thurs.. Oct. 2, at 4:15 p.m. Appli-
cations should be turned in to 2026
Angell Hall on or before Oct. 15.
U. of M. Student Flying Club plan-
ning reorganization meeting. All those
interested call 3-0658.
Student sponsored social events list-
ed below are approved for the coming
week-end. Social chairmen are remind-
ed that requests for approval for so-
cial events are due in the Office of Stu-
dents Affairs not later than 12 o'clock
noon on the Monday prior to the
events.
October 3
Martha Cook
Osterwell Coop House
Phi Delta Phi
Stockwell Hail
October 4
Alpha Delta Phi
Chi Phi
Cooley House
Delta Tau Delta
Elliott League House
Gamma Phi Beta
Kappa Sigma
Lambda Chi Alpha
Phi Delta Phi
Phi Delta Theta
Reeves House
Sigma Nu
Theta Delta Chi
Tyler House
Victor Vaughan House
Delta Sigma Delta
Nu Sigma Nu
October 57
Phi Delta Phi
Men's organized house groups are au-
thorized to entertain women guests for
broadcasts of the Stanford-Michigan1
game on Saturday afternoon between;
5 p.m. and 8 p.m. Groups planning this
entertainment must notify the Office
of Student Affairs, 1020 Administration,
and must receive the approval of chap-
erons not later than Thurs. noon, Oct.f
2, 1952. Chaperons may be a resident
house director or one married couple
at least twenty-five years of age
Personnel Requests:
The Federal Bureau of Investigation
of Washington, D.C., is now accepting
applications for the position of Special
Agent. Men graduating from the Law
School or individuals holding a degree
in accounting who have had three 'years
of practical accounting and/or aduiting
experience in addition to filling the fol-
lowing requirements are eligible: citi-
zen of the United States, willing to
serve in any part of the United States
or territorial posessions, 25 years of age

and not older than 41 years of age, and
in perfect health.
The Federal security Agency, Public
Health Service, in Washington, D.C.,
announces examination for appoint-
ment of Scientists (Psychologist) to
the Regular Corps of the United States
Public Health Service. Appointments
to be made are in the grades of As-
sistant Scientist (equivalent to Navy
rank of Lieutenant, j.g.) and Senior-As-
sistant Scientist (equivalent to Lieu-
tenant). The requirements for both
grades are U.S. citizenship are at least
21 years of age. Applications must be
in not later than October 21, 1952.
For further information please con-
tact the Bureau of Appointments, 3528
Administration Building Ext. 371.
Lectures
Freshman Health Lectures for Wom-
en will be given two semesters. Wom-
en students, whose last names begin
with the letters A to L will attend
these lectures in the first semester be-
ginning Mon., Oct. 6. There will be two
sections scheduled as follows:
Section I-A through C, 4 p.m., Nat-
ural Science Auditorium.
Section II-D through L, 7:30 p.m.,
Natural Science Auditorium.
The women in the Freshman class
whose last names begin with the let-
ters Mc through Z will be scheduled for
the health lectures in the second se-
mester. Information aboutethese lec-
tures will be announced later.
Academic Notices
Preliminary Ph.D. Examinations in
Economics. Theory examinations will
be given on Thurs. and Fri., Oct. 30 and
31. The examinations in other subjects
will be given on Mon., Tues., and Wed.,
Nov. 3, 4 and 5. Each students plan-
ning to take these examinations should
leave with the Secretary of the Depart-
ment not later than Wed., Oct. 8, his
name, the three fields in which he de-
sires to be examined, and his field of
specialization.
Doctoral Examination for James Er-
nest Boggs, Chemistry; thesis: The Kin-
etics of the Exchange of Isotopic Chlo-
rine between Hydrogen Chloride and
Methyl Chloride, Monofluoro-Difluoro-,
and Trifluoro-Methyl Chlorides,"
Thurs., Oct. 2, 3003 Chemistry Bldg.,
1:30 p.m. Chairman, L. O. Brockway.
Department of Mathematics Seminars.
The following seminars have been ar-
ranged in the Department of Mathe-
matics:
Analysis, Kaplin-3:15 Tues., 3214 AH
Applied Mathematics, Churchill-4:00,
Thurs., 247 WE
Class Field Theory, Tornheim-2:30
Mon., 3214 AH
Extremal Methods in Complex Vari-
ables, Reade-3:00, Mon., 279 WE
Geometry, Leisenring-4:30 Wed., 3001
AH
Hilbert Spaces, Rothe.-Those inter-
ested should get in touch with Mr.
Rothe.
Integration in Abstract Spaces, Hilde-
brandt-3:00, Thurs., 3217 AH
Logic & Foundations, Harary - 3:00,
rues., 3001 AH
Order Types, flushnik - 3:15, Mon.,
3217 AH
Orientation Seminar, Rainich - 3:0'
Wed., 3001 AH
IRepresentation of Classical Groups,
Thrall-1:30 Thurs., 3218 AH
Statistics--Organization meeting
Tues., Sept. 30, 12:00, 3020 AH
Topology, Wilder-3:00, Wed., 3217 AH
Topological Methods in Analysis,
Young-4:00, Thurs.,, 3217 AH
Three Dimensional Point Set Theory,
Mois-2:00 Wed., 3217 AH
Theory of Games, Copeland-Time of
first meeting to be announced.
Seminar in Applied Mathematics.
First meeting Thurs., Oct. 2, 4 p.m.,
247 West Engineering Building. Prof.
R. C. F. Bartels will speak on "The
Ship-Wave Problem."
Physical Chemistry Seminar. Wed.,
Oct. 1, 4-6 p.m., Room 2308.
Sociology 51. Mr. Greenblatt will not
meet his sections on Wed., Oct. 1, and
Thurs. Oct. 2.
Course 401, Interdisciplinary Seminar

on the Application of Mathematics to
the Social Sciences, will meet on Thurs.,
Oct. 2, 3409 Mason Hall, 4 p.m. Prof. C.
H. Coombs of the Psychology Depart-
ment will speak on "Decision Making
Under Uncertainty-Methodology."
Scandinavian 51. All subsequent ses-
sions will meet in 35 Angell Hall.
The University Extension Service an-
nounces that registration is still open
in the Wednesday -evening following
courses offered in the program for
adults. Enrollment may be made in
Room 165, School of Business Admin-
istration, between 6:30 and 9:45 p.m.
through Thursday of this week.
Administration of the Hospital Nurs-
ing Unit (Nursing 20, two hours credit).
The study and application of princi-
ples of democratic administration to
the head nurse unit. Instructor, Prof.
Virginia M. Null, 7 p.m., 170 School
of Business Administration. Sixteen
weeks, $18.
Ceramics. Beginning course in the
materials and forms of pottery. Basic
ceramic design applied to the potter's
wheel and simple uses of glazes. in-
structor, Prof. Thomas F. McClure. 7:30
p.m., 125 Architecture Building.Sixteen
weeks, $18; laboratory fee $5.
Great Books, Section II. This section
of the University of Michigan course
on Great Books is open to students
who elected the extension course on
Great Books last year. Instructor, John
E. Bingley. Opening tonight, the class
will meet on alternate Wednesdays at
7:30 p.m., 69 School of Business Admin-
istration. Eight sessions, $8.
Parliamentary Procedure. The prin-
ciples of parliamentary procedure and
the rules for conducting business meet-
ings of clubs, associations, and conven-
tions will be explained with opportu-
nity for practice in presiding. Instruc-
tor, Dr. Fred G. Stevenson. 7:30 p.m.,
177 School of Business Administration.
Eight weeks, $6.
Practical Gardening. A survey course
in methods and techniques of plant-
ing, transplanting, pruning, and soil
management. Instructor, Ruth Mosher
Place. 7:30 p.m., 176 School of Busi-
ness Administration. Twelve weeks, $8.
Workshop in Creative Writing. A
course in the short story, the personal
essay and poetry for beginners and in-
termediate students. Instructor, Dr.
Sheridan W. Baker, Jr. 7:30 p.m., 171
School of Business Administration. Six-
teen weeks, $18.
Events Today
International Center Orientation Pro-
gram. The first of eleven weekly talks,
designed to give students from other
countries a broad interpretation of
democracy at work in the United States,
will take place at 7:30 p.m., Interna-
tional Center, 603 East Madison Street.
Mr. William Zerman, Assistant to the
Dean of Students, will speak on "Know
Your University." All new students from
outside the continental United States
are urged to attend, and all others are
welcome.
Seminar: "Prophetic Religion of the
Old Testament" led by Prof. Leroy Wa-
terman. Lane Hall, 7:30 p.m. The first
of a series of discussions open to every-
one.
Student Legislature will meet in the
Strauss Dining Room, East Quadrangle,
promptly at 7:30. All students and fac-
ulty are welcome.
Student Affiliate, American Chemical
Society. Officers' Meeting, 5 p.m., 3003
Chemistry Building.
Congregational Disciples Guild. First
meeting of supper discussion groups, 7
p.m., Guild House. Only dessert will be
served.
Sociology Colloquium. Prof. Otto Neu-
loh, Director of the Institute for So-
cial Research, University of Munter,
will speak on "Social Science Research
in Germany," in East Conference Rm.,
Rackham Bldg., 4:15 p.m. All interest-
ed persons are invited.
Board of Representatives will meet at
4;30 p.m., Michigan League. It is very
important that representatives from
every women's residence be there.
The Students for Stevenson Club will

meet at 8 p.m., Room 3R, Micnigan
Union. Professor Theodore Newcomb
will speak in "Public Opinion in an
Election Year." All students, faculty,
and friends are invited.
Lutheran Student Association. Tea
and Coffee Hour, 4 to 5:30, Student
Center, corner of Hill and Forest Ave.
Congregational Disciples Guild. Mid-
week chapel, 5:05-5:35, Douglas Chap-
el.
General Fiction Staff will meet in
Rm. 3S, Union, 7:30 p.m. Anyone in-
terested is invited.
Student Players announces tryouts
for "Brigadoon," a musical fantasy.
No experience necessary. All welcome.
3-5:30 and 7:30-10:30 p.m., Michigan
League. (See bulletin board for i'oom.)
Hillel Publicity Committee organiza-
tional meeting, 4 p.m. at 1429 Hill. All
those who are interested are invited to
attend.
The Hillel Social Committee will
hold its first meeting of the year at 4
p.m., Hillel Foundation. Ali interested
are invited to attend. If you cannot
come, but are interested, please leave
your name at the Hillel office.
Roger Williams Guild. World Under-
standing Institute, 7 p.m., Chapman
Room, First Baptist Church. "The
Country and People of Africa," Prof.
Horace Miner.
Roger Williams Guild. Mid-week Chat,
4:30-5:45, First Baptist Church.
Delta Sigma Pi, professional business
administration and economics frater-
nity. Business meeting, tonight at the
new chapter house, 927 Forest.
Coming Events
History Department graduate stu-
dents and faculty are invited to attend
"An Introduction to the Clements Li-
brary" on Thurs., Oct. 2, 7:30 p.m.,
International Center Weekly Tea for
foreign studentTS and American friends,
Thurs.; Oct. 2, 4-6 p.m.
International Relations Club. There
will be a meeting of all old members
Oct. 2, at 7:30, Rm. 3N, Union. An
election of president and the plan-
ning of a program will take place.
Inter-Cultural Outing, Sat. and Sun.,
Pickerel Lake. Leave Lane Hall, 2:00
p.m., Sat. Phone Lane Hall, 3-1511J Ext.
2851, for reservations by Fri. noon.
Hillel Coffee Hour Thurs., Oct. 2, 4
p.m., Hillel Building, 1429 Hill Street.
There will be refreshments and enter-
tainment.
Hillei News organizational meeting,
Oct. 2, 4 p.m. at 1429 Hill. Positions are
open for writers, photographers, and
other staff members. All those inter-
ested are invited to attend.
Lutheran Student Association. Matins
Service Thurs. morning, Student Cen-
ter, 7:30-7:50.
La P'tite Causette will meet from 3:30
to 5 p.m. tomorrow in the North Cafe-
teria of the Michigan Union.
Civil Liberties Committee. First meet-
ing of the fall semester Thurs., Oct. 2,
at 7:30, Union. Plans for semester's ac-
tion will be formulated. Old members,
new students, and all interested are
welcome.
Ending Friday

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 70 1.78 ''2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Silver & jade Mexican bracelet.
Vicinity of Angell Hall. Thurs., Sept.
25. Ph. 9201. Mary Lee Baisch.
LOST-University High School ring, gold
with green stone. R. Torres engraved
under tape on the bottom. At 4712
South Quad, Ext. 247 Taylor House.
)3L
LOST-A.T.O. pin with initials P.D.K.
Saturday. Ph. 2-6015. )4L
LOST-Black key case, vicinity Maynard
and Williams. Ph. 3-1511, Ext. 2848.
Mrs. Hellenga. )5SL
FOR SALE
2 END TABLES, contemporary wrought
iron and walnut designers' models:
reasonable mahogany bowls and oil
painting. 9455, Mr. Hoffman. )2
MODERN PINBALL MACHINE. Will sell
only for fraternal or personal use.
$25. Phone 29490.
1946 FORD Business Coupe. Radio and
heater, $425.00. Ph. 2-3944.
1937'BUICK-Body, tires perfect. Make
an offer. Ed Miller, 3-4145. )21
UPRIGHT FISCHER PIANO--Make us
an offer. Call 9783 after 5:30 P.M. )22
GIRLS English bicycle in good condi-
tion. Call 2-9616. )23
TWO SCHWINN bicycles, good condi-
tion, gear shifts, hand brakes. Wayne,
2556W. )24
ROOMS FOR RENT
FOOTBALL weekend guest rooms avail-
able. Student Room Bureau. Phone
Don Tewes, 3-8454 8 a.m.-11 p.m. )3R
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS-
Reserve rooms now at The Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near
State). Phone 3-8454. )2R
A QUIET ROOM in southeast district
for grad student or professional man.
ROOM AND BOARD
ANY GIRL can afford room or board at
Osterweil, 338 E. Jefferson, 2-2218. 2
blocks from campus. )2X
PERSONAL
KEEPSAKE, REWARD-Will person who
bought 1921 silver dollar, with initial
"E"on face, from State Street bank,
phone 2-2982.
ROOM-MATE TO SHARE a three-room
furnished ap't with young woman
teacher. Ph. 20879.
NO TIME
to read a 7e daily newspaper amidst
activities, dates, and English themes?
Then why not read the week's news in
TIME
for 6c a copy. Phone Student Periodi-
cal Agency, 6007. )7P

HELP WANTED
STUDENT TO FIRE BOILERS. Experi-
ence preferred but not necessary.
Hours 5-7 p.m. Monday thru Saturday,
and all day Sunday. Call in person
at Neilson's Greenhouses-1019 Maiden
Lane.
PART TIME store clerk for men's wear
and shoe store. Experience preferred.
Good wages. Inquire in person. Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington. )4H
NEED 3 or 4 apple pickers after or be-
tween classes. Experience preferred.
Phone Whitmore Lake 5601, John
Mitacek, 9385 Spencer Rd. )7H
MALE STUDENT-Fairly husky for work
in Lithographic Shop. Should have
approximately half days available.
Some experience would be helpful.
Call 3-0591 for interview. )13H
TRANSLATORS from Russian, German,
French, Spanish.Portuguese, Japa-
nese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish,
Dutch, and Italian Into English need-
ed. Scientific or technical background
essential. Russian trans. especially
needed. Ph. Mrs. Lotze, 2-1871. )14H
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING - Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet weshing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
' and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )5B
WANTED-Students for lunch (70c) and
dinner ($1.30) Mon. thru Fri. Phone
2-7409. )6B
GOOD Rental Typewriters available{ at
reasonable rates. Office Equipment
Company, 215 E. Liberty. Phone 2-1213;
)4B
* WANTED TO RENT
ONE CAR GARAGE wanted, preferably
near Hill and State. Call 3-4187. )1W
MISCELLANEOUS
PLAYTIME CARE OF CHILDREN
in my home. Educational toys, play-
ground equipment. Sat. also. Phone
3-1037. )1M
IF YOU HAVE 3 or more members in
your family and would like to save
up to $350.00 per year on food, call
Mr. Stern, 2-0720 daily 3-5, 6-9. )8M
44
ENDING TONIGHT
"There is no room
for argument --
'CARRIE' IS
BY FAR THE
BEST FILM
HOLLYWOOD
HAS SENT US
THIS YEAR!"
-Alton Cook,
Wood-Telegram & Sun
Laurence
OLIVIER
Jennifer

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:

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.4

,

lELP WANTED
STUDENT'S WIFE or Coed to work in
coffee shop for part time. Hours 7:30
until 9:30 mornings. Monday through
Saturday. Ph. 5464 or"6087.

A PAtAMouw NPCTUU
Added'
TOM & JERRY
in "CRUISE CAT"
Thurs. "Don't Bother To Knock"

i

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I

115 W. Liberty Phone 8950
HOBBYSHOP
Headquarters for Model and Hobby Supplies
-Model Airplanes -Model Railroad Kits
-Airplane Motors -Locomotives
-Old Time Cars -Hobby Tools
---Model Race Cars -Balsa Wood
-Ship Models -Plexiglas
RELAX WITH 'A HOBBY
New Monogram Model Contest starts October 1st
- Come In and Ask Us About It -

L

U _____________________ -

1.-
r

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I

a

This Magnum of French Champagne ends Thursday.
EK EKEY-,. A MERRY GO
RUND OF LOVE
vELIGHTFUL . THE PICTUEl f THE EAR
IIATE- INEMA
y-PLEH InMYS nON
Friday - HELEN HAYES in "MY SON JOHN"

ME-

I

BRING QUICK RESULTS
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

.1

STUDENT PLAYERS ANNOUNCES
TRYOUTS FOR
"BRIGADOON"'
Tues. Sept. 30 and Wed. Oct. 1
3:00-5:00 P.M. and 7:30-10:30 P.M.
THE MICHIGAN LEAGUE

SD'

eC
Did you
ever Sleep
with a
A. Kraft+
That's a funny question but -nevertheless there's a fellow
who did it regularly. His name is Floyd Humeston and
there's quite a story about him that Life Magazine printed,
Humeston had a pet lion named "Fearless Fagan" and
when he was drafted he took his lion to camp. The results
were so funny M-G-M made a movie out of them.
Make a note to watch for this picture because it's prob.

it\IL f

THE ARTS THEATER
Presents It's Fall Season
Albert Camus: CROSS PURPOSE

K.E &
f
Y"NfI

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III

11 .h - ® A . ~A 1

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