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September 26, 1952 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-09-26

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TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY,.SEPTEMBER 26, 1952

4

CLUB SURVEY:
YP's To Stress Culture,
Education in Program

(Editor's Note: This is the third
In a series of articles designed to
acquaint the student body with the
various campus political organiza-
tions.)
By DIANE DECKER
After several harrowing experi-
ences with the University Lecture
Committee last spring, the cam-
pus Young Progressive organiza-
tion plans to devote much of its
time this year to culture and edu-
cation, according to acting chair-
man Marge Buckley, '53.
The club is planning a Peace
Festival or an International Fes-
tival in the interests of promoting
better understanding between na-
tions. However, it will not com-
pletely abandon its political acti-
vity.
SL To Show
Two Films
S t u d e n t Legislature Cinema
Guild will present "Volpone" and
"My Man Godfrey" at 7 and 9
p.m. today and tomorrow in Hill
Auditorium.
"Volpone," Ben Jonhson's bawdy
Renaissance comedy, stars Harry
Bauer and Louis Jouvet. Carole
Lombard and William Powell will
play the leading roles in "My
Man Godfrey." Included with the
double feature will be a techni-
color short on The Michigan
Marching Band.
Cinema Guild is run by SL for
the benefit of all student groups
on campus. All profits from the
50 cent admission charge will go
to worthwhile projects such as the
Fresh Air Camp, displaced stu-
dents and scholarship funds.
Ph. 5651e14#1
.F-- Ending Tonight

AMONG THE speakers whom
the YP hopes to bring to campus
this fall are noted pacifists Mur-
iel Lester and Dr. Kronbach. The
organization will support the
candidacy of national and State
Progressive candidates and plans
to be particularly active in pro-
moting two local candidates who
have been active with their or-
ganization.
Prof. John Shepard of the
psychology department, who is
running for State Senator, is
the faculty sponsor of the club
and U.S. senatorial candidate
David Luce is a former YP mem-
ber.
Nor will the YP give up its ac-
tivities in campus affairs. Miss
Buckley said they will continue to
push abolishment of the Lecture
Committee and will work with the
Student Legislature human rela-
tions committee to end discrimi-
nation.
The Young Progressives feel it
is necessary to have a liberal group
on campus which is interested in
reform within the Democratic tra-
dition. Miss Buckley maintains
that the group is willing to stand
up for student rights in the face
of adverse criticism, and thus of-
ten takes the lead in fighting in-
fringement of such rights.
An organizational meeting will
be held at 8 p.m. Tuesday in Rm.
3B of the Union. A recording of
W. E. B. DuBois' speech, "Peace
Can Win," will be played at that
time.
New Pollock
Book{ Printed
The first book of a projected
two volume work on the back-
ground of German development
by Prof. James K. Pollock, chair-
man of the political science de-
partment has been published.
Entitled "Germany in Power
and Eclipse," the book presents a
survey of the German state and
society until 1945. The second
book will deal with the impact of
the war and occupation on Ger-
many.
The first volume is the result
of 22 unit studies prepared at the
University during the war.

RecommendI
More Local
School Aid
Stressing the danger of too large
a proportion of state aid to public
schools, Lee M. Thurston, state su-
perintendent of public instruction,
called for increased local support
of schools.
Thurston spoke to some 300 per-
sons at the opening session of the
Fifth Annual Conference for
School Board Members, School Of-
ficials and Laymen yesterday at
the University.
ALTHOUGH he didn't advo-
cate cutting state appropriations,
Thurston recommended that
schools should be "locally con-
trolled and, largely, locally
equipped.
He emphasized that schools
must be put into 'top-notch
condition" for a growing popula-
tion of children in the state
"the like of which Michigan has
never seen."
In order to outfit the schools
Thurston said that 431 million
would have to be spent by Septem-
ber, of which 90 million has al-
ready been dispensed,
"To take care of the growing
population of school children,
Michigan requires an increase of
some two to three thousand teach-
ers annually. Additional teachers
required this year at the elemen-
tary level numbered about 2,500,"
Thurston pointed out.
"When he equate these things
so that we have as much local sup-
port as state support to take care
of these needs, then we need no
longer fear about the freedom of
our American way of life insofar
as the schools may carry that
safeguard," Thurston declared."
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Dailycassumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent In
TYPWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday).
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1952
VOL. LXIII, No. 4
Notices
Dedication Ceremonies for Haven
Hall, Mason Hall, and the Angell Hall
Auditoriums. The ceremonies will be
held on Fri., Sept. 26, from 3 to 6 p.m.
The new buildings will be open to the
public from 3 to 5. At 4:30 p.m. mem-
bers of the Deans Conference will as-
semble in the Regents Room and mem-
bers of the faculty will gather in the
lobby of the second floor of the Ad-
ministration Building. Academic cos-
tume will be worn. Promptly at 4:50
p.m. a procession will leave the Ad-
ministration Building and will pro-
cede to the steps of the General Li-
brary, where the ceremonies will be
held. In case of rain, the Rackham
Lecture Hall will be used. Faculty mem-
bers and others participating should
assemble in the Board Room of the
Rackham Building at 4:45 p.m. in
academic costume.
School of Business Administration.
Faculty meeting Fri., Sept. 26, 3 p.m..
146 Business Administration Building.
1952-53 Lecture Course Tickets Now
on Sale. Seven outstanding attractions
will be offered this year by the Orator-
ical Association and season tickets af-
ford a substantial saving. The follow-
ing distinguished celebrities are sched-

uled: Drew Pearson, famous columnist,
Oct. 15; The Drama Quartette, starring
Charles Boyer, Charles Laughton, Ced-
ric Hardwicke and Agnes Moorehead in
"Don Juan In Hell," Nov. 5; World Af-
fitirs Today, panel of international
speakers from France, Turkey, Philip-
pines and United States, Nov. 20; Sen-
ator Paul Douglas and Congressman
Walter Judd in discussion "Our Foreign
Policy, Right or Wrong?" Jan. 14; Em-
lyn Wiliams, English actor, in unique)
theatrical performance "Charles Dick-
ens," Feb. 16; James B. Reston, noted
journalist, March 9; Ogden Nash, cele-
brated writer of light verse, March 19.
Students and their wives are granted
a special rate for the full course, sec-

end balcony, unreserved, $2.50. Tickets i
may be purchased at Hill Auditorium
box office daily from 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Regents' Rules Governing Operation
of Motor Vehicles by Students. "No stu-
dent in attendance at the University
shall operate any motor vehicle. In ex-
ceptional and extraordinary cases at
the discretion of the Dean of Students
this rule may be relaxed." The regula-
tion governs the use of a car as well
as the operation of one; consequently
it is not permissible for a student to use
his car or his family's car for social,
personal, or other purposes when the
car is driven by any person who is not
a member of his immediate family. Any
act of driving without first securing
permission from the Office of Student
Affairs will constitute grounds for dis-
ciplinary action.
Students may apply for exemption
from the ruling by calling in person
at the Office of Student Affairs, 1020
Adminisrtation Building, and by giv-
ing complete information on their cars.
Only the following students may apply
for exemption:
a) Those who are twenty-six years of
age or older.
b) Those who have a faculty rating
of teaching fellow or higher. It is to
be emphasized that exemption is not
granted automatically but is given
only upon personal request.
All other student drivers must re-
port to the Office of Student Affairs,
where they may petition for special
permits which will enable them to use
their cars for purposes which are
deemed absolutely necessary.
Permits issued during the academic
year are valid for both semesters, and
for summer school provided the per-
mit is stamped summer session, and
provided the need. for the car remains
the same.
Honor Societies are requested to reg-
ister the names and addresses of of-
ficers for the present year with the Of-
fice of Student Affairs, 1020 Adminis-
tration. This information should be
filed immediately so that nail and in-
quiries can be properly directed.
Student Organizations Planning To
Be Active during the present semester
must register in the Office of Student
Affairs not later than Oct. 10. Forms
for registration are available in the
Ofice of Student Affairs, 1020 Admin-
istration Building.
with official recognition a student or-
ganization assumes the responsibility
of (1) submitting a list of officers and
members at the beginning of each se-
mester within which recognition is de-
sired, promptly reporting additions to
membership during the term; (2) se-
curing the acceptance of a member of
the faculty willing to serve as adviser;
(3) maintaining organization finances
in a manner satisfactory to the Auditor
of Student Organizations; (4) present-
ing to the Committee on Student Af-
fAirs for consideration any changes in
organizational structure, objectives, ac-
tivities, bases of membership, or affili-
ations with other organizations, either
local or national.
For procedures and regulations re-
lating to student sponsoredactivities,
officers are referred to University Reg-
ulations Concerning Student Affairs,
Conduct, and Discipline available in
the Office of Student Affairs.
Applications for Fulbright Awards for
graduate study or reasearch abroad
during the 1953-54 academic year are
now available. Countries in which
study grants are offered are Australia,
Austria, Belgium, Burma, Denmark,
Egypt, France, Greece, India, Iran, Iraq,
Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, New
Zealand, Norway, Pakistan, the Phil-
ippines, Thailand, Turkey, the Union
of South Africa, and the United King-
dom. West Germany is now also open
for Fullbright applications. The grants
are made under Public Law 584, 79th
Congress, the Fulbright Act, which au-
thorizes the Department of State to use
foreign currencies and credits ac-
quired through the sale of surplus prop-
erty abroad for programs of education-
al exchange with other nations. Grants
are made for one academic year and
generally include round-trip transpor-
tation, tuition, a living allowance, and
a small amount for necessary books and
equipment. All grants are made in for-
eign currencies.
Interested students who hold an A.B.
degree or who will receive such a de-
gree by June, 1953, and who are pres-
ently enrolled in the University of
Michigan, may request application
forms for a Fulbright award at the of-
fice of the Graduate School. The clos-

ing date for receipt of applications is
October 31.
Eligibility for Non-Athletic Extracur-
ricular Activities. Students participat-
ing or planning to participate in non-
athletic extracurricular activities should
review the following rules which gov-
ern participation in such activities. Any
student on academic discipline who is
now holding an office or participating
in an activity which falls within the
eligibility rules must resign from that
position or activity immediately and
notify the organization concerned and
the Office of Student Affairs in writ-
ing that he has done so. Such notices
must be filed in the Affice of Student
Affairs, 1020 Administration, not later
than Oct. 3. Students who continue in
an activity after that date while on
academic discipline will be considered
in violation of the eligibility rules.
Rules Governing Participation in Non-
Athletic Extracurricular Activities:
Eligibility Statement. Any regularly
enrolled student is eligible to partici-
pate in non-athletic extracurricular ac-
tivities provided he is not on academic
discipline.
Responsibility. Responsibility for ob-
servance of the eligibility statement
is placed directly upon the student. In
case of doubt of status, students should
inquire at the Affice of Student Af-
fairs. Participation in an extracur-
ricular activity in violation of the re-
quirements may subject a student to
disciplinary action.
Restrictions. In interpretation of the
above eligibility statement, the follow-
ing are specifically forbidden to par-
ticipate in extra-curricular activities
below:
(a) Students on academic discipline,
i.e. notification, warning, probation,
action pending.
(b) Part time ant special students
carrying less than 12 hours.
Activities. The eligibility reuire-
ments must be met by students partici-
pating in such activities as are listed
below. The list is not exhaustive but is
intended to indicate the kinds of ex-
tracurricular activities for participa-
tion in which eligibility is necessary.
(a) Participation in public perform-
ances which are sponsored by student
organizations and which requiregroup
rehearsal.s Examples: Union Opera,
Junior Girls' Play; productions of Gil-
bert and Sullivan Society, Student
Players, Inter Arts Union; performances
of Arts Chorale, Glee Clubs, and Band
(for students not enrolled in Band
courses).
(b) Staff members of studen't publi-
cations. Examples: Daily, Gargoyle,
Michiganensian, Technic, Generaltion.
(c) Officers and chairmen of standing
committees in student organizations,
including house groups. (This includes
positions in house groups such as so-
cial, rushing, personnel, publication
chairmen, house managers, and stew-
ards.)
(d) Class officers or candidates for
such office.
(e) Members and candidates for mem-
bership in student government groups.
Examples: Student Legislature, Judi-
ciary Councils, Interfraternity Council,
Panhellenic Board, Assembly Board,
Intercooperative Council, League and
Union student government groups, En-
gineering Honor Council, Music School
Assembly, Business Administration
Council.
(f) Committee members for major
campus projects and dances: Examples:
Michigras, Winter Carnival, League
Committees, Frosh week-end, Sopho-
more Cabaret, Assembly Ball, Interfra-
ternity Council Ball, Homecoming
Dance, Senior Ball, J-Hop.
(g) Representatives to off-campus
conferences.
Special Permission. Special permission
to participate in extra-curricular avtic-
ities in exception to the regulations
may be granted in extraordinary cases
by the offices of the Dean of Women
and the Dean of Students.
Denial of Permission. The Dean of
Women or the Dean of Students may,
in extraordinary cases, deny permis-
sion to participate in an activity or ac-
tivities.
Participation Lists. Managers and
chairmen of student activities and proj-
ects are required to submit to the Of-
fice of Student Affairs an alphabetical
list of all students participating in ac-
tivities under their leadership, indicat-
ing positions held. For activities which
are organized at the beginning of a
semester, lists must be filed not later
than the end of the first week of
classes. For activities organized during
the semester, participation lists must
be filed within forty-eight hours aft-
er the activity is organized.
(Continued on Page 4)

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MICHIGAN DAILY

Phone 23 -24.1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P M
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6bDAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 overage words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday Is 3 P.M., Saturdays.
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST - Reversible jacket, blue and
checked. Left in Waterman during
registration. Name under collar, 3-8213.
)1L
FOR SALE
LEICA IIIC with F2 Summitar. Like new
$250.00. Ph. 5948 evenings. )6
MAGS
at special student rates for the entire
school year.
Colliers................ .....$3.35
Etude ............................ 2.50
Esquire.........................4.50
Ladies Home Journal ............ 2.00
Life ..... ...................,,... 3.00
Time ...........................,2.00
Saturday Evening Post.......... 3.50
Just phone your order to 6007 or write
Student Periodical Agency, Box 2006.
Credit extended; act today. )5
CANARIES and Parakeets, also new and
used bird cages. 562 S. 7th Street,
Phone 5330. )10
CORONA Portable$Typewriter with
French accents. $25. Ext. 2842. )12
2 END TABLES, contemporary wrought
iron and walnut designers' models;
reasonable mahogany bowls and oil
painting. 9455, Mr. Hoffman. )2
GIRLS BIKE - Good condition. Call
2-5193. )14
FOR RENT
120 N. INGALLS-Room for two men.
$5.50 each with linen. Phone 3-0746
or 3-0166. )1F
ROOMS FOR RENT
FOOTBALL weekend guest rooms avail-
able. Student Room Bureau. Phone
Don Tewes, 3-8454 8 a.m.-11 p.m. )3R
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS-
Reserve rooms now at The Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near
State). Phone 3-8454. )2R
SINGLE ROOM and Double Room. 1331
Wash. Ph. 7595. )6R
ROOM AND BOARD
BOARD AND ROOM or board only for
girls in sorority house. Call 2-1017
evenings. )1X
PERSONAL
KEEPSAKE, REWARD-Will person who
bought 1921 silver dollar, with initial
"E" on fade, from State Street bank,
phone 2-2982.
ATTENTION RUSHING CHAIRMEN! -
For free cigarettes during rushing
please contact Jay Martin, 3-8508. )2P
NEED A Female Factotum? Will work
industriously on your research, your
book, any reasonably interesting task
including English tutoring; office
work. $2.50 hr. Phone 2-7608. )3P
ROOMMATES - $1 subscribes to Time
for the entire school year. Just phone
6007, Student Periodical. )4P
TRANSPORTATION
GRAD STUDENT DRIVING TO CALI-
FORNIA week of October 5. Passengers
wanted to share driving and expense.
Call 25-9194. )3T
HELP WANTED
BABY SITTER in exchange for dinner,
laundry privileges, quiet study. Three
evenings per week. Phone 2-7474. )2H
k

e

HELP WANTED
MAKE $20.00 DAILY - Sell luminous
name plates. Write Reeves Co., Attle-
boro, Mass. Free sample and details.
3H
PART TIME store clerk for men's wear
and shoe store. Experience preferred.
Good wages. Inquire in person. Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington. )4H
MICHIGAN UNION-Sophomore or Jun-
lor part time work at Main Desk. )6H
NEED 3 or 4 apple pickers after or be-
tween classes. Experience preferred.
Phone Whitmore Lake 5601, John
Mitacek, 9385 Spencer Rd. )7H
MESSENGER
Student work mornings as messenger
for a UniversityDept. Must have car.
For further details inquire at the
University Personnel Office, Rm. 3012,
Ad. Bldg. )8H
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING - Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet wF shing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )5B
BEAUTY CLINIC-Specialists in beauty
treatments and haircuts. Evening ap-
pointments available. 1027 East Ann.
Phone 7221. )3B

CIREFIEDES

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING WANTED - Rates reasonable,
prompt service. Phone 3-4449. Mrs. Ida
L. Vaughn, 914 Mary Street. )2B
WANTED-Students for lunch (70c) and
dinner ($1.30) Mon. thru Fri. Phone
2-7409. )6B
GOOD Rental Typewriters available at
reasonable rates. Office Equipment
Company, 215 E. Liberty. Phone 2-1213.
)4B
WANTED TO RENT
ONE CAR GARAGE wanted, preferably
near Hill and State. Call 3-4187. )1W
MISCELLANEOUS
BOARDERS WANTED--Goodfood, rea-
sonable rates. Close to campus. Call
Bill Kempf, 2-0549. )3M
PLAYTIME CARE OF CHILDREN
in my home. Educational toys, play-
ground equipment. Sat. also. Phone
3-1037. iM
BABY SITTING in private nurses home
for football games. Phone 7894. )4M
GROUP IV STUDENT with Group I
football tickets desires exchange. Sat-
isfactory terms. Phone Art, 6943. )5M
BOARDERS WANTED-Theta Delta Chi,
700 So. State. Call Gary Frye, 2-3297.
)6M

i

THE ARTS THEATER
Q! . eia sense of being in touch with draia
as ite issi. great thea/rical centers of the
world. --HERBERT BARROWS, Mich, Daily
MEMBERSHIPS NOW AT THE THEATER,
WAHR'S, BOB MARSHALL'S, MUSIC CENTER
%STOP
.:: ONE-STOP
.. LAUNDERING
and
Cleaning Service
li Laundry Takes Less Than An Hour
wet wash or ,fluff dried and folded.
Finished Shirts
48-HOUR SERVICE
Dry Cleaning
10% DISCOUNTS
30 New Maytag Automatic Washers and 5 Large Dryers
Open Evenings for Your Convenience
'We ELFV tuhdE

1

Starts Friday

715 Packard (near State)

Phone 2-4241

ri'

.....

OPENS SUNDAY
SEPT. 28th

r

.ii.ii

ALWAYS TWO
Esther
WI LLIAMS
in
"'SKIRTS
AHOY"

FEATURES
Randolph
SCOTT
in
"CARSON
CITY"

HILL AUDITORIUM
Tonight and Saturday
CONTINUOUS FROM * LAST COMPLETE SHOW
7:00P.M. 9:00 P.M.
LAST SHOWING of "VOLPONE"-10:30

ADMISSION 44c

Cinemna SL
PRESENTS

quald

"SLICKED

-ADDED-
UP PUP"

CARTOON

I

I

COOL

COOL

1111

Ends Tonight
"JUST ACROSS
THE STREET"
and
"BONZO GOES
TO COLLEGE"
STARTS SATURDAY
Late Show Sat. Nite
,QOM That Lived with Danger!

Great 2(Comedies
HARRY BAUER - LOUIS JOUVET
in BEN JOHNSON'S
"VOLPONE"
in French-English Titles
"It has been a long time since any film has made me laugh as much as 'VOLPONE' .
Plenty of straightforward ribaldry . . . Bauer is the most satisfying Volpone you ever laid eyes
on . .. A HILARIOUS FILM AND YOU OUGHT TO SEE IT."
-JOHN McCARTEN, The New Yorker
SHOWN At 7:00 AND 10:30

CAROLE
LOMBARD

WILLIAM
POWELL

ALICE
BRADY

"MY MAN GODFREY"
Alan Mowbray-Mischa Auer
"Daffiest comedy of the year. . . . There may be a sober moment or two in the picture;
there may be a few lines of script that do not pack a laugh. Somehow we cannot remember
them. . . . AN EXUBERANTLY FUNNY PICTURE." .--The New York Times.
SHOWN AT 9:00 ONLY

_ _.....

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