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January 16, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-01-16

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sm

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

+RIMAY, JANUARY

'Cagers Meet Spartans Here

i

EVERYBODY

ON:
Football Has Returned
To Horse, Buggy Days .

ath-

By DICK LEWIS
"Football has returned to the
haorse and buggy days."
So says Alabama football coach
*fed Drew and he is backed up by
:just about 80 per cent of the
,other coaches in the country.
Drew is justified in his statement
,when you consider the dozens of
misfortunes that the "iron-man"
nterpretation will bring back.
I * *
BIGGEST gripe from the spec-
tator's viewpoint is the poorer
brand of football which will ulti-
mately emerge. The two-platoon
system provided fans with the
best type of play possible-spe-
cialists in every phase of the
dame.
. But with specialists gone a
cut in team efficiency will re-
sult, causing less fan interest
and consequently fewer spec-
tators. Two platoons made for
a faster, more efficient, more
interesting type of game.
Now athletes with exceptional
offensive and defensive talents
are a matter of the past. It's
goodbye for the end-skirting skat-
back and the T-formation quar-
terback-and all the other color-
ful one-way performers.
MICHIGAN'S immortal Field-
ing H. Yost said "Athletics for
All." Just the opposite of this
statement is one of the faults in
the new "iron-man" rule. It pre-
vents boys who ordinarily would
have played from participating on
the gridiron.
Squad reduction means that
countless players who were
formerly on the field at least
half the time will now never
play at all.
The big boys have been preach-
ng all along about giving more
LATE HOCKEY
Detroit 4, Boston 0

college students a shot at

letics, but when it comes to actu-
ally instituting such a program no
such thing happens.
DON'T BE surprised if suddenly
next football season a rash of
serious injuries breaks out in con-
tests across the nation. This is
merely another manifestation of
the new ruling.
In the past, avoidance of
over-fatigue through the two-
platoon method rested players
and reduced injury. Now tired
players can't be rested; at least
not without the loss of their
services for the rest of the per-
iod they leave.
If the high-handed St. Peters-
burg decision proved anything it
showed that football coaches have
little to say about the conduct of
the game today.
* * 4
A FEW DAYS before the Florida
conclave, coaches voted by a 4-1
majority to retain the free-sub-
stitution regulation. Then, with
financially -frustrated small-col-
lege administrators in the driver's
seat, the momentous change was
reached by a "unanimous" vote.
The gruelling task of building
whole new teams to play both
ways (and the subsequent break-
up of some of the best football
talent ever assembled) is the
inevitable outgrowth of the
NCAA move. Longer practice
sessions and less time for studies
will be required.
Add to this super-charged re-
cruiting methods for topnotch
two-way talent, the dropping of
scores of coaches who made the
sport what it is today, and slow-
ed-down and lull-filled action.
Then you'll have an accurate
picture of what college football
will look like comes the Fall of
1953.

Seek Upset
Over Third.
Place State
Michigan's Wolverines will be
shooting for an upset victory to-
morrow night as they renew their
old rivalry with the Spartans of
East Lansing on the basketball
court.
The game is scheduled for 8
p.m. in the Yost Field House.
MICHIGAN STATE is presently
occupying third place in the Big
Ten standings behind Indiana and
Illinois with a 3-2 record while
Michigan hangs on the brink of
the cellar, sporting a 2-6 Con-
ference history.
Led by speedy Al Ferrari, 6-2%
sophomore forward, State has
marked up wins over Northwest-
ern, Ohio State, and Iowa.
Ferrari, a reserve at the begin-
ning of the season, has worked
into a starting assignment as the
Spartan top scorer, averaging
around 15 points a game.
At 6-8 center Bob Armstrong
will be tallest man on the floor.
Playing opposite Ferrari at the
other forward post State boasts
veteran forward Keith Stackhouse,
captain of the team.
Little 5-5 Ricky Ayala and Dick
Wesling provide a short fast com-
bo at the guard spots.
Coach Bill Perigo will depend
on the same men he has been
playing all year to produce a Wol-
verine victory.
He will start Don Eaddy and
Ray Pavichevich as guards and
work-horse Paul Groffsky at cen-
ter. Along with Mead, John Cod-
well is slated for a forward spot.
Michigan's only other Big Ten
game in the between-semesters
interlude matches it with Illinois,
second ranked Conference team,
on February 9.
A third non-conference game
with Washington University of
St. Louis will be sandwiched in
between Michigan's two Big Ten
meetings. This is slated for Jan.
31 at St. Louis.

By IVAN KAYE
The NCAA rules committee's de-
cision to abolish two platoon foot-
ball is a step in the right direction.
The action will return the game
to the all-round player and re-
move it from the hands of the
"chrome-plated, hand-tooled spec-
ialists" of the post war era. The
accent is now on versatility rather
than on mass produced' special-
ties.

PRO:
New Grid Rule Change
MeansEnd of Specialist

t

to the

GOES!

enough, under the platoon system
more men at a given school may
play, but an overall index of the
sport would undoubtedly show a
decline in the number participat-
ing.

LUE
OOK
ALL

11

4

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41

a
The a
Winter
of
with delici

impus capers
ill for Coke
ccent's on hi-jinks at the
Carnival and a happy part
the occasion is refreshment...
ous ice-cold Coca-Cola.
OOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OP tHE COCA*COLA COMPANY SY
ANN ARBOR COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY

4

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*Cbke' is a vgistered trademairk.

© 1953, THE COCA-COLA COMPANY

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Presenting:
Artur Schnabel
Playing VOLUMES I and II of the
BEETHOVEN SONATA SOCIETY SET

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First time available in this country.
also:

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