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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 25, 1952 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-09-25

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 195

LEGI SLATLYE LOWDOWN:
SL Uses Parliamentary Set-Up

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This article is
the first in a series designed to
acquaint students with the prob-
lems, projects, personnel and strile-
ture of the Student Legislature.
The first article deals with SL's
organization.)
Organized along the lines of
parliamentary government, the
Student Legislature set-up on
campus is much like that used at
other colleges and universities
throughout the country.
About the only unusual aspect
of campus government is its elec-
tion system, which is practically
unique at the University. SL em-
ploys the Hare system of propor-
tionate voting while at other
schools political parties or dis-
Tomorrow Set
For Dedication
Of Buildings
One of the University's rare ded-
ication ceremonies will be held to
observe the official opening of t!he
immense new Angell Hall addition
at 5 p.m. tomorrow on the steps
of the General Library.
Students who are still un-
acquainted with the recently con-
structed buildings after the first
week of classes will have an op-
portunity to take guided tours
through the sprawling building
from 3 to 5 p.m. tomorrow. There
will also be refreshments and a
string ensemble at the open house..
Directly preceeding the actual
dedication ceremony there will
be an academic procession be-
ginning at 4:50 p.m. at the Ad-
minisrtation Building with a
brief stop at the south entrance
of Angell Hall Auditoriums. Just
inside the entrance Presdient
Harlan H. Hatcher will unveil
a plaque honoring former Presi-
dent James Angell.
On the library steps State Comp-
troller Robert Steadman, Goer.
G. Mennen Williams' representa-
tive at the function, and Rep. Jo-
seph Warner, chairman of the
House Ways and Means Commit-
tee will present the building to
President Hatcher. The president,
in, turn, will turn the building over
to the University's newly appointed
literary college Dean Charles E.
Odegaard.

trict systems determine the make-
up of student government.
UNDER the parliamentary, or
committee system, six standing
committees do most of the basic
SL project work. They are the
campus action, culture and educa-
* * *

Howard Willens, '53, president;
Phil Berry, Grad, vice-president;
Susan Popkin, '54, recording sec-
retary; Karin Fagerburg, '54, cor-
responding secretary; Bob Neary,
'54, treasurer; and Roger Wilkins,
'53 and Sondra Diamond, '53,
members-at-larke.
* * *
AN ADMINISTRATIVE wing
serves as the secretarial staff for
SL. Ruth Rossier, '54, acts as
head of this group.

I

SL meetings are held regu-
larly at 7:30 p.m. every Wednes-
day in the Strauss dining room
of East Quardangle. At this
time the 50 members bring up
their projects and ideas which
are referred to appropriate com-
mittees for study. Later detailed
plans are submitted for legisla-
tive approval.

HOWARD WILLENS
... campus spokesman
* * *
tion, human relations, internation-
al, varsity, election and public re-
lations committees.
SL's executive branch is the
Cabinet which is elected by the
members twice a year. Acting
as coordinator of all SL activi-
ties, the Cabinet also handles
interim policy functions, dis-
cusses campus problems and is
responsible for many projects.
Present Cabinet officers are:
Course in Driver
Training Plannied
The University, as part of its
program to teach high school stu-
dents to be responsible drivers, is
conducting a seminar course for
driver-education teachers.
The course is for those who at-
tended a recent University train-
ing institute and who wish to ob-
tain further, more concentrated
instruction. This is to be the first
time that such seminars have been
conducted anywhere, according to
Everett J. Soop, Extension Serv-
ice director. These seminars are
to become a regular part of the
future driver-training institutes
conducted by the University.

Much interest centers on SL
meetings for they are the forum
where all campus problems are ul-
timately debated. During the past
year SL has handled many issues
ranging from bias clauses to li-
brary hours. Immediate projects
this fall will be follow-up action
on the lecture committee issue and
study of a leadership training pro-
gram.
New Extension
Courses Open
The University Extension Serv-
ice is currently offering two
courses from the Family Living
Program to all interested persons
in the Ann Arbor area.
Persons not enrolled in the Uni-
versity will have a chance to take
evening extension classes in Eco-
nomic and Financial Problems of
the Family, which opened last
night, and Design Principles in the
Home, which will open at 7:30 p.m.
today in 346 Architecture Bldg.
. Registration, which is $18.00 for
each course, may be made between
6:30 and 9:45 p.m. Monday
through Friday in Rm. 165 Busi-
ness Administration Bldg.
Courses in Marriage and Family
Life, Parent-Child Relationships
and Family Health will be offered
in the future.
SL W'ing To Meet
All students interested in work-
ing with the Student Legislature
in an administrative capacity are
urged to attend the SL Adminis-
trative Wing meeting at 4 p.m. to-
day, in the Student Legislature of-
fices in the old Journalism build-
ing on State Street.

The new buildings will be open to the
public from 3 to 5. At 4:30 p.m. mem-
bers of the Deans Conference will as-
semble in the Regents Room and mem-
bers of the faculty will gather in the
lobby of the second floor of the Ad-
ministration Building. Academic cos-
tume will be worn. Promptly at 4:50
p.m. a procession will leave the Ad-
ministration Building and will pro-
cede to the steps of the General Li-
brary, where theceremonies will be
held. In case of rain, the Rackham
Lecture Hall will be used. Faculty mem-
bers and others participating should
assemble in the Board Room of the
Rackham Building at 4:45 p.m. in
academic costume.
School of Business Administration.
Faculty meeting Fri., Sept. 26, 3 p.m..
146 Business Administration Building.
Student Sponsored Activities. All ac-
tivities and projects sponsored or pro-
duced by student organizations must re-
ceive the approval of the Committee on
Student Affairs. Petitions for considera-
tion by the Committee should be sub-
mitted to the Office of Student Affairs
at least two weeks before the event is
to take place. Request forms may be se-
cured in the Office of Student Affairs,
1020 Administration.
Calendaring. Activities must be cal-
endared to take place before the tenth
day prior to the beginning of a final
examination period. Advance reserva-
tion of specific dates for major pro-
jects may be made with the calendaring
committee of the Student Legislature in
accordance with announcements made
by it.
speakers. Before the Committee on
Student Affairs will considera request
for approval of a meeting at which a
student organization proposes to pre-
sent a speaker, approval of the speak-
er by the Committee on University Lec-
tures is required. Request for such ap-
proval must be submitted to the Lec-
ture Committee at least two weeks
prior to the date of the planned meet-
ing.
Committee on Student Affairs. Regu-
lar meetings of the Committee on Stu-
dent Affairs for the school year will
be held on Oct. 14, 28; Nov. 11, 25; Dec.
9; Jan. 13, 27; Feb. 10, 24; March 10, 24;
April 21, May 12, 26.
Social Events sponsored by student'
organizations at which both men and
women are to be present must be reg-
istered in the Office of Student Af-'
fairs, and are subject to approval by
the Dean of Students. Application forms
and a copy of regulations governing
these events may be secured in the Of-
fice of Student Affairs, 1020 Adminis-
tration Building. Requests for approval
must be submitted to the office no lat-
er than noon of the Monday before
the event is scheduled! A list of ap-
proved social events will be published in
the Daily Office Bulletin on Wednes-
day of each week.
In planning social programs for the
semester, social chairmen will want to
keep in mind the action of the Com-
mittee on Student Affairs which re-
quires that the calendar be kept clear of
student sponsored activities for the ten
day prior to a final examination pe-
riod. Final examinations for the pres-
ent semester begin January 19.
Applications for Fulbright Awards for
graduate study or reasearch abroad
during the 1953-54 academic year are
now available. Countries in which
study grants are offered are Australia,
Austria, Belgium, Burma, Denmark,
Egypt, France, Greece, India, Iran, Iraq,
Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, New
Zealand, Norway, Pakistan, the Phil-
ippines, Thailand, Turkey, the Union
of South Africa. and the United King-
dom. West Germany is now also open
for Fuibright apprications.' The grants
are made under Public Law 584, 79th
Congress, the Fulbright Act, which au-

thorizes the Department of State to use
foreign currencies and credits ac-
quired through the sale of surplus prop-
erty abroad for programs of education-
al exchange with other nations. Grants
are made for one academic year and
generally include round-trip transpor-
tation, tuition, a living allowance, and
a small amount for necessary books and
equipment. All grants are made in for-
eign currencies.
Interested students who hold an A.B.
degree or who will receive such a de-
gree byJune. 1953, and who are pres-
ently enrolled in the University of
Michigan, may request application
forms for a Fuibright award at the of-
fice of the Graduate School. The clos-
ing date for receipt of applications is
October 31.
Committee on Student Affairs. At its
meeting on Sept. 23 the Committee on
Student Affairs took the following ac-
tions:
Granted recognition: Citizens for Ste-
vension, Inter-House Council (tempo-
rary recognition).
Approved:
Sept. 25 Student Legislature, speak-
er, John Yoshiro
Oct. 11 Assembly-Inter-House Coun-
cil dance, 1 o'clock closing
Oct. 18 Marching Band to Evanston;
Wheaton, Ill. Oct. 17.
Nov. 22 Marching Band to Columbus
Calendar additions and changes were
approved as follows:
Dec. 10, 11, 12 Michigan Union Opera
Dec. 13 Union Christmas Formal
Dec. 13 South Quad Formal (closed)
Dec. 12, 13 Cinema Guild movie
Dec. 14 Inter Arts Union Christmas
Dance concert
Mar, 25, 26, 27. 28 Released
Student sponsored social events are ap-
proved for the coming week-end for the
following list. Social chairmen are re-
minded that requests for approval for
social events are due in the Office of
Student Affairs not later than 12
o'clock noon on the Monday prior to
the event.
Sept. 26
Hinsdale House
Kelsey House
Mosher Hall
Phi Delta Phi
Scott House
Sept. 27
Acacia
Alpha Epsilon Pi
Alpha Kappa Kappa
Alpha Kappa Psi
Alpha Rho Chi
Alpha Sigma Phi
Alpha Tau Omega
Beta Theta Pi
Chi Phi
Delta Chi
Delta Sigma Delta
Delta Sigma Phi
Delta Sigma Pi
Delta Sigma Theta
Delta Tau Delta
Delta Upsilon
Kappa Nu
PhipAlpha Kappa
Phi Chi
Phi Delta Phi
Phi Gamma Delta
Phi Kappa Psi
Phi Kappa Sigma
Phi Kappa Tau
Phi Sigma Delta
Phi Rho Sigma
Phi Sigma Kappa
Pi Lambda Phi
Psi Omega
Allen Rumsey
Sigma Alpha Epsilon
Sigma Alpha Mu
Sigma Chi
Tau Delta Phi
Theta Chi
Theta Xi
Triangle
Zeta Beta Tau
Zeta Psi
Chi Psi

FOR SALE
LEICA IIIC with V2 Summitar. Like new
$250.00. Ph. 5948 evenings. )6
'38 DODGE-Good motor, 5 tires, insured
$75. Univ. ext. 2142. B. Singer. )8
1940 Oldsmobile - 1947 motor, $140.00.
Body rough, no motor trouble. Radio,
heater. Call 5996 noon or evenings. )4
2 END TABLES, contemporary wrought
iron and walnut designers' models;
reasonable mahogany bowls and oil
painting. 9455, Mr. Hoffman. )2
MAGS
at special student rates for the entire
school year.
Colliers........................$3.35
Etude.......................... .2.50
Esquire .....'...................4.50
Ladies Home Journal ............2.00
Life.............................3.00
Time...........................2.00
Saturday Evening Post .......... 3.50
Just phone your order to 6007 or write
Student Periodical Agency, Box 2006.
Credit extended; act today. )5
1947 CROSLEY"- Good condition, $85.
Phone 2-8975 after six. )1
CANARIES and Parakeets, also new and
used bird cages. 562 S. 7th Street,
Phone 5330. )10
BOOK of Football Tickets, Burns, 631
E. University, Phone 3-4747. )11
CORONA Portable Typewriter with
French accents. $25. Ext. 2842. )12
'49 FORD CONVERT-Red R-H-O; Good
condition, $995. T. Emmons, 3-4966.
)13
2 END TABLES, contemporary wrought
iron and walnut designers' models;
reasonable mahogany bowls and oil
painting. 9455, Mr. Hoffman. )2
FOR RENT
120 N. INGALLS-Room for two men.
$5.50 each with linen. Phone 3-0746
or 3-0166. )1F
ROOMS FOR RENT
FOOTBALL weekend guest rooms avail-
able. Student Room Bureau. Phone
Don Tewes, 3-8454 8 a.m.-11 p.m. )3R
PLEASANT single room for student.
Call 5728. )5R

ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS-
Reserve rooms now at The Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near
State). Phone 3-8454. )2R

COMFORTABLE SUITE for two
Prefer graduate students. Call
5:30 p.m., 1402 Hill.

Men.
after
)1R

SINGLE ROOM and Double Roomn. 13.31
Wash. Ph. 7595. )6R
ROOM AND BOARD
BOARD AND ROOM or board only for
girls in sorority house. Cali 2-1017
evenings. )JX
PERSONAL
KEEPSAKE REWARD-Will person who
bought 1921 silver dollar, with initial
"E" on face, from State Street bank,
phone 2-2982.
ATTENTION RUSHING CHAIRMEN! --
For free cigarettes during rushing
please contact Jay Martin, 3-8508. )2P
NEED A Female Factotum? Will work
industriously on your research, your
book, any reasonably interesting task
including English tutoring; office
work. $2.50 hr. Phone 2-7608. )3P
ROOMMATES - $1 subscribes to Time
for the entire school year. Just phone
6307, Student Periodical. )4P
TRANSPORTATION
GRA pSTUDENT DRIVING TO CALI-
FG.NIA week of October . Passengers
wanted to share driving and expense.
Call 25-9194. )3T
WANTED-Ride from Lansing to Ann
Arbor on Monday mornings to arrive
at 8 a.m. Phone Bill Joy at 2-9318. )2T
WANTED-Ride from Plymouth to Any.
Arbor on Mon., Wed., and Fri. around
8 o'clock. Phone University Ext. 2853.
)IT

HELP WANTED
MAKE $20.00 DAILY - Sell luminous
niane plates. Write Reeves Co., Attle-
boro, Mass. Free sample and details.
)3H
PART TIME store clerk for men's wear
and shoe store. Experience preferred..
Good wages. Inquire in person. Sam's
Store, 122 F. Washington. )4H
WANTED - Part time help in flower
shop. Some experience preferred.
Must be available during Christmas
and Easter holidays. Apply --Good
news, 225 E. Liberty. )5H
BABY SITTER in exchange for dinner,
laundry privileges, quiet study. Three
evenings per week. Phone 2-7474. )2H
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING WANTED - Rates reasonable,
prompt service. Phone 3-4449. Mrs. Ida
L. Vaughn, 914 Mary Street. )2B
ALTERATIONS -- Ladies' garments,
prompt service. Call 2-2678. Catherine
St., near State, )1B
WASHING - Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )5B
BEAUTY CLINIC-Specialists in beauty
treatments and haircuts. Evening ap-
pointments available. 1027 East Ann.
Phone 7221. )3B
WANTED-Students for lunch (70c) and
dinner ($1.30) Mon. thru Fri. Phone
2-7409. )$B
A# MISCELLANEOUS
BOARDERS WANTED-Good food, rea-
sonable rates. Close to campus. Call
Bill Kempf, 2-0549. \i)3M
PLAYTIME CARE OF CHILDREN
in my home. Educational toys, play-
ground equipment. Sat. also. Phone
3-1037. )IM
BABY SITTING in private nurses home
for football games. Phone 7894. )4M

4

III,

:S il

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

Ending Saturday
S' "
;r Jaks
MONA FREEMAN
Cartoon -- News -- Sport
Next Attraction
Laurence Olivier
Jennifer Jones
in "CARRIE"

I

EDGEWA TER PARK
BALLROOM
__DANCING_
Every Saturday Night
THIS SATURDAY
Located on Seven Mile Road
1 Block East of Telegraph, DETROIT
--------------------------------1
SPECIAL TO ANN ARBOR
OI
I STUDENTS ONLY:
IThis ad will admit I
2 persons for the price of 1
when presented at th* box office.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --- -
Call KENWOOD 1-2660 collect
for Information

11

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.t

DRAMA QUARTETTE TO BE PRESENTED IN ANN ARBOR

SECOND NUMBER
NOVEMBER 5

1952-53 Lecture Course

CHARLES
BOYER
CHARLES

I

11

LAUGHTON
CEDRIC
HARDWICKE
AGNES
MOOREHEAD
In Shaw's witty
"DON JUAN IN HELL"
"The most brilliant and glit-
tering show of modern time!"
--TimE Magazine

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1 1

BUY SEASON TICKETS NOW TO THIS
CELEBRITY SERIES OF DISTINCTION

SEVEN STELLAR ATTRACTIONS:

DRAMA -- LITERATURE
NATIONAL and WORLD AFFAIRS

Season Tickets Provide Substantial Savings and Assure Good Seats
$7.50 (Main Floor) - $6.50 (First Balcony)
T CDf'I A I CTI LkIT D ATE [

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