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January 10, 1953 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-01-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

FOUR

TH E MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JANUARY 10, 1953

_ i

Mmm

Karl Marx

Society LYL
Instigated
(Continued from Page 1)
The League and its support-
ers also had a hand in the de-
mise of what started out to be
a thriving University chapter of
the National Association for the
Advancement of'Colored People,
a group known nationally tor
its successful fight against Com-
munist domination.
Formed by a group of interested
Negro and white students, the lo-
cal NAACP was slowly infiltrated
as anti-Communist interest wan-
ed until the League and its sup-
porters held a majority in meet-
ings.
The original non-front NAACP
had gained the recognition of the
national chartering organization
only a few days before a League-
sponsored contingenit headed by
Myron Sharpe requested a simi-
lar charter. The NAACP head-
quarters refused to consider
Sharpe's group.
After domination of the local
NAACP by the League, the or-
ganization was permitted to die.
Its last president failed to register
the group with the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs. last Fall.
Another projected LYL front,
the Karl Marx Society, appears
to have run up a blind alley in
Its attempt to gain University
recognition. Regarding the Karl
Marx group the League's secret
evaluating directive has this to
say:
"League education on campus
has been very poor. We should at-
tempt to see established a variety
of study groups to interest a larg-
er section of students-economics,
philosophy, physics, the Negro
question, psychology and Ameri-
can history. We should attempt to
relate classroom studies to Marx-
ism.
"We should like to hear opin-
ions about the establishment of
a Karl Marx Society as a recog-
nized organization to interest
greater number of students iin the
study of Marxism."
BUT LYL efforts to secure a
faculty supervisor for the Marx
group have met with no success.
Though several professors have
been approached, they have re-
fused to sponsor the group.
Several League members are in
the forefront of the projected stu-
dent organization. These are Rob-
ert Schor (elected president of the
Society at its organizational meet-
ing), Stephen Smale, Omar Kid-
well, and Myron Sharpe.
Another member is Norman
Klein, who has taken part in
LYL's activities in New York
Pity and Ann Arbor, attending
meetings in both localities. .
In any case, given the back-
ground of the Society and the con-
trolling affiliations of some of its
members, it is virtually certain
that the SAC would gefuse to rec-
ognize it as a legitimate student
group.
Moreover, with its purposes
known to the campus at large, it
is even more doubtful that the
League could lure any non-sympa-
thizer into the ranks of its latest
front.

AUTHOR OF "BLUE TANGO":
Anderson To Appear at Hill

By CYNTHIA BOYES
Ann Arborites will have an op-
portunity to hear Leroy Anderson,
popular writer of "Blue Tango,"
conduct the University Symphony
band in a group of his own com-
positions at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow
in Hill Auditorium.
According to Billboard Maga-
zine's poll, "Blue Tango" was the
biggset selling record of 1952, yet
its composer "never thought it
would be popular."
* * ii
COMMENTING on the diffi-
culty of writing popular music,
the well-known 'composer noted
that it must be simple and have
a direct appeal to eyerybody. Only
one out of every 36 published
songs ever becomes very popular,
he said, and no composer can
guegs his own popularity.
This being 'the case, Ander-
son must have had many pleas-
ant surprises when such songs
as "Sleighride," "Syncopated
Clock," a Hit Parade tune in
1951, and "Jazz Pizzicato" be-
came national favorites. His
most recent big success,- "Bluie
Tango" was found by Billboard
magazine to be the song most
played by disc jockeys in 1952.
Anderson attended Harvard
University where he received his
master's degree in music. As an
undergraduate he played trom-
bone in the Harvard band and in
his senior year became musical
director of the band. The sym-
phonic arrangements of college
songs he wrote for them are still
being played.
After teaching theory kt Rad-
cliffe College for two years, and
serving as a church organist and
Union Plans
TheaterTrip
The Union is sponsoring a thea-
tre trip to Detroit to see "Stalag
17" on Thurs., Jan. 15. .
Tickets, which include orches-
tra seats and the bus ride to De-
troit, can be purchased between
3 and 5 p.m. at the Union for
$3.75. The cast, which includes
Henry Tobias and Doug Watson,
will hold a short question period
after the play.
Education Board

* * * *

Union Plans
Last Dance
For Seniors
As one of the last events on the
agenda before final exams, the
Union is planning a 'Farewell
Fling' to be held from 9 p.m. to
midnight tonight in the Union
ballroom.
This dance is intended as a fare-
well party for the seniors who are
graduating in February.
There will be momentos given
to those seniors who register at
the door. The identity of the
gifts is being kept a secret until
the beginning of the dance.
Clare Shepard and his band are
scheduled to provide the music.
Entertainment during inter-
mission will be emceed by Bernie
Kahn, Grad., and Jay Mills, '53.
Also on the program will be Al
Wall, Grad., singing to his own
guitar accompaniment.
This dance is not restricted to
Seniors, however, and all Union
members are invited. Tickets are
on sale for $1 a couple.
Director To Attend
Hawaiian Confab
, Prof. Robert B. Hall, director
of the Center for . Japanese
Studies, has been selected as one
of 15 U. S. representatives to at-
tend a conference of the Insti-
tute of Pacific Relations of Ha-
waii scheduled for January 17-20
in Honolulu.
Griffin Elected
To Anthropology
Prof. James B. Griffin, director
of the University Museum of An-
thropology has been elected vice-
president of the anthropology sec-
tion of the American Association
for the Advancement of Science,
University officials announced yes-

ACLU SURVEY SHOWS:
Editors Optimistic About Civil Liberties

By ALICE BOGDONOFF
Newspaper editors apparantly
do not take a "civilization at the
barricades" attitude towards the
status and future for civil lib-
erties.
Instead, editors of papers in 19
major cities who participated in a
survey conducted last month by
the American Civil Liberties
Union, were generally calm and
opitimistic about the outlook for
civil liberties, the survey reported.
A majority of the editors expressed
the belief that despite specific
threats to civil liberties, condi-
tions are better than a year ago.
IN THE CITIES reporting, the
editors concluded that:
1. There is continued improve-
ment in race relations, although
as one editor observed, "there
is a long way to go."
2. The widespread post-Korea
practice of requiring loyalty oaths
of many groups apparantly has
abated; suggestions for oaths
were opposed successfully in two
communities.
3. Court trials are generally
fair, but the public was reported
Cameron, Crary
To Attend Council
Prof. George G. Cameron, chair-
man of the Department of Near
Eastern Studies, and Prof. Douglas
D. Crary, of the anthropology de-
partment, will attend a meetingof
the Near East Committee of the
Social Science Research Council
in New York City today.

to be little concerned with cases
involving passport refusal.
4. Academic freedom is being
preserved for teachers in most of
the communities responding.
5. Investigations locally of al-
leged disloyal and subversive per-
sons appeared to be declining.
L. S. FANNING, managing edi-
tor of ,the San Francisco Chron-
icle commented that "probably the
greatest single danger to our civil
liberties are the super-patriots."
Cited by an Iowa paper editor
as so called "super partiots"
were the V.F.W., the American
-Legion and Amvets who, the
editorial writer claimed, are
"constantly alerted to protest
the appearance of certain speak-
ers." "But," the writer pointed
out, "these groups no longer
even talk about breaking up a
meeting to which they object."
I.

Brewster P. Campbell, executive
city editor of the Detroit Free
Press and former Managing Edi-
tor of The Daily told the ACLU
that "there is a constant threat to
the free exercise of civil liberties."
IN THE REALM of race rela-
tions, most editors believed that
the citizens in their areas favored
education rather than legislation
for improving race relations. One
who did not hold this view was
James Kerney Jr., editor of the
Trenton Times who wrote that
"New Jersey has a successful
FEPC law and the public attitude
as a result of its success appears
to favor a Federal law."
The Florida St. Petersburg
Times said that school authorities
and the Citizens Advisory Commit-
tee for Schools have stood firm
against pressure by a private
group to "exercise 'patriotic' cen-
sorship of school textbooks."

,,

-Daily-Don Campbell
LEROY ANDERSON, COMPOSER OF "BLUE TANGO," WILL
BE GUEST CONDUCTOR AT HILL AUDITORIUM

* * *

*U

* *

SHIRT SALE
at
WIL WW 'DS
State'Street on the Campus

choirmaster, he returned to Har-
vard graduate school for four
years, majoring in Scandanavian
languages. With his knowledge of
Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Ger-
man and Icelandic, he entered the
army intelligence in 1942 as a pri-
vate, served with American forces
in Iceland and was discharged a
captain in 1946.
He then returned to his pre-war
job as arranger for the Boston
Pops Orchestra where he was fre-
quently a guest conductor.
According to Anderson, thej
ideas for his songs, 36 of which
have been published, were not
inspired by anything in partic-
ular but came to his mind "as
a result of constantly looking
for them. The more you think
of ideas, the more ideas you
get."

His melodies are never conceiv-
ed by sitting at a piano and pick-
ing them out. He thinks away
from the piano and uses it only
to check on how his ideas sound
or to play accompaniment.
His technique apparently has
given results. Besides the hit songs
to his credit, his orchestra has re-
corded two albums entitled "Le-
roy Anderson Conducts" Vol. I
and II, and a record of "A Christ-
mas Festival." His "Irish Suite"
of six songs will be released in
February.
Following his first rehearsal
with the band on Thursday, An-
derson had only the highest praise
for them. "It is a wonderful
band," he said, "of professional
standard. They are flexible, and
alert, and respond immediately."

V,

11 :

I

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Jan. 11--Sacrament.
1 :00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings from
7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30 to
4:30.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Service, with sermon by the
pastor, "Forward with Christian Hope."
Sunday at 5:30: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper. Program at 6:30, showing of
"Hidden Treasures", 45. min. 16 mm. sound-
color Sermon from Science.
Tuesday at 8:15: Chapel Assembly meeting.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10 A.M.: Unitarian Church School.
Unitarian Adult Group-Mrs. Peg Hall on:
"The Old and the New Bibles."
11 A.M.: Services. Sermon by Rev. Edward H.
Redman: "Worship in the Liberal Faith."
12:15 Fellowship Dinner.
5:30 P.M.: Junior High Group at the church.
7:30 P.M.: Unitarian Student Group-transpor-
tation from Lane Hall at 7:00 P.M.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Sts.
Rev. George Barger, Minister
Sunday, January 11
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Sermon: "Christ Gives Power for Today."
Nursery for children during service.
9:45 Sunday School.
CONGREGATIONAL DISCIPLES GUILD
Student Guild House, 438 Maynard
Tuesday Student Tea 4:30-6:00.
Sunday, January 11, 7:00 Congregational Church.
Three students who ore back from the Balti-
more USCC conference will lead a discussion
on new ideas presented there.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Discussion Class "Understanding the
Christian Faith."
10:45 A.M.: Worship ."Religion Without Teors"
Dr. Large preaching.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship supper.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and Program. Discussion
after showing of the AFSC Film "A Time For
Greatness."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open doily.

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
No. Division at Catherine
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Miss Ada Mae Ames, Counselor for Women
Students
8:00A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Stu.
dent Breakfast at Canterbury House).
11:00 A.M.: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: Morning prayer. Sermon by the Rev.
Wilbur Schutze.
6:45 P.M.: Canterbury Club (University Stu-
dents), Canterbury House.
8:00 P.M.: Epiphany Festiv'al of Lights.
Wednesday and Thursday 7:00 A.M.: Holy Com-
munion, followed by Student Breakfast at
Canterbury House; Friday 12:10 P.M.: Holy
Communion; 4-6 P.M.: Student tea, Canter.
bury House.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
William H. Bos, Minister to Students
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.: Worship service, sermon by the pas-
tor, subject: "An Act of Consecration."
7:30 P.M.: Student Guild at Lane Hall.
Ruth Stoerker, leader.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by-the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning. Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Verduin.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Rev. Leonard Parr
10:00 A.M.: Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Sermon: Heirloom or Heritage?
CONGREGATIONAL DISCIPLES GUILD
At 7:00 P.M. the three students who are back
from the Baltimore USCC Conference will lead
a discussion on their new ideas.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Sts.
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00 A.M
Sunday at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings 7:30 P M.
Newman Club Rooms in Basement of Chapel
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
'(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street at South Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, D.D., Pastor
Sunday-9:20 A.M.: Bible Study.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Service at Center.
7:00 P.M.: LSA Meeting-Films of Medieval
Europe by Don Steiner, Law '54.

I

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11

SELL ALL YOUR
TEXT BOOKS
FOR
CASH
OR EXCHANGE
'AT

t

m4ka A

E

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets. Phone 2-1121
Wm. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M.: Bible School.
11:00 A.M.: "Building Up The Body of Christ."
6:15 P.M.: Grace Bible Guild Supper.
7:30 P.M.: "The Perfect Man and Man's Per-
fect Saviour."

9

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.

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